Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 5/22/2005 11:10:04 AM EDT
Because I have to write a short paper on the 'high points' of Buddhism, from a philosophical/ethical standpoint.

I don't need history, statistics, or whatnot - just ethical or philosophical stuff.

Anybody?
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:12:36 AM EDT
I've never met one that wasn't very polite and respectful. All I know.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:14:20 AM EDT
Ultimately a very respectable belief system that focuses on the elimination of desire. Strong parrallels with Christianity if you understand that desire and temptation can be close to the same concept.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:28:08 AM EDT
There is an ancient Buddhist text called the Bardo Thodol or Tibetan Book of the Dead. It was used to as a guide to be recited over the newly deceased to help guide them on their journey in the after life. Read up on it.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:50:22 AM EDT
People say bhuddism is a philosophy and not religion. This is not really true. It has it's own "world view" and spritual goals (to reach Nirvana). The only problem is it;s very very hard to explain to someone who has'nt studied it. It's not like christianity or islam whre you just accept one God then do what the commandments are. But like all world religions its main concern is the the same as the others. #1 above all is Compassion for all living beings. including bugs and worms etc. etc. They are "souls" like we are so to kill one is too be like killing a human being. (this causes big problems in terms of civilsations advancement for them) #2 alleviating suffering of yourself and others is of prime importance. #3 they are Polythestic - A bhuddhist can have one God or a billion! it does'nt matter as long as you stick with the precepts of the Bhudda. #4 charity is also essential. #5 material possessions is frowned upon because freeing yourself of worldy things is essential to Gain Nirvana. #6 they have a duty to spread the "dharma" way of bhudda, to convert others to bhuddhism. But as far as I know there is not one instance of Bhuddhists ever Conquering or forcing to convert others in the name of Bhudda. They never would have done to the indians like spain and england did! Also they have never used Bhudda as a war cry! In short, in the east world the idea of fighting over religion is almost non-exsistant. Here in the west we fight and prsecute others in the name of religion. Islam vs. christianity, Christianity vs. Judaism, Judaism vs. Islam etc etc. Bhuddhists have never fought Taoists! bhuddhists have never fought Hindus, Hindus never fought Shintoists. That's because they are not-monothesists. They are much more Egalitarian. When you have many Gods do you really need to kill others who don't belive in your Gods? No. So I would say an important "side effect" virtue of Bhuddhism is that they do not attack others for not beliving what they belive.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:58:13 AM EDT
I am a Catholic Buddhist. In other words, spiritually I am Catholic and philosophically, Buddhist. The Buddha stated that he teaches one thing - suffering and the end of suffering. Buddhists may or may not believe in God - Buddha told his followers to look inside themselves for the truth. Following is a little bit of additional information about the Buddha's teaching:

"Basics of Buddhism - The Four Noble Truths
The starting point for understanding Buddhism is the Buddha's teaching on the Four Noble Truths. In his early life, despite the pleasures that were readily available to him, the Buddha saw that the world was a place of suffering or 'unsatisfactoriness'. Whatever happiness could be attained could not withstand the inevitable onslaught of old age, sickness and death.
1. Suffering or dukkha is the first noble truth that in his search for enlightenment the Buddha came to see very clearly. As human beings, suffering is part of our lives, whether physical, mental or emotional. More fundamentally, there is a sense within us that life cannot bring lasting satisfaction. Life is impermanent and ever-changing, and any happiness that we enjoy is unstable. But why is this so?

2. Craving or tanha is the second noble truth. If we suffer it is a result of selfish desire - wanting to satisfy our senses with pleasurable experiences and wanting to avoid what is unpleasant. This craving is also connected with bolstering our sense of ourselves as having a permanent self rather than a personality which is subject to change.
3. The end of suffering is Nibbana, the third Noble Truth. Buddhism would be a bleak religion if it stopped at the first two truths. When he attained enlightenment, the Buddha saw and experienced that there was an end to suffering, a place of ultimate peace and understanding. He taught that this state was here and now and could be experienced through following the right path.

4. The Noble Eightfold Path, the Fourth Noble Truth (ariya-sacca), is the Buddha's practical method for attaining Nibbana. In short, the Noble Eightfold Path requires us to develop wisdom, morality and meditation. All three are necessary and inform each other. The eight factors that make up this path are: right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration.

The Four Noble Truths are the bedrock of the Buddha's teaching and unite the different schools of Buddhism and their differing practices. "

I hope this helps.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:00:03 AM EDT
Trying to find God through Buddhism is a confused goal.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:01:32 AM EDT
Buddhism embraces all religions. It is possible to be buddhist and another religion.
My ex husband and his family are buddhist and from observing them I would have no objections to them influencing my kids towards that religion.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:02:48 AM EDT
They have REALLY nice statues often made of gold.

That's all I know.

Sgtar15
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:03:09 AM EDT
Not Far from Buddhahood

A university student while visiting Gasan asked him: "Have you ever read the Christian Bible?"

"No, read it to me," said Gasan.

The student opened the Bible and read from St. Matthew: "And why take ye thought for rainment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They toil not, neither do they spin, and yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these... Take therefore no thought for the morrow, for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."

Gasan said: "Whoever uttered those words I consider an enlightened man."

The student continued reading: "Ask and it shall be given you, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened."

Gasan remarked: "That is excellent. Whoever said that is not far from Buddhahood."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:03:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:
They have REALLY nice statues often made of gold.

That's all I know.

Sgtar15



and a bottle of heinekin in front of the little fat dude
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:04:37 AM EDT
The True Path

Just before Ninakawa passed away the Zen master Ikkyu visited him. "Shall I lead you on?" Ikkyu asked.

Ninakawa replied: "I came here alone and I go alone. What help could you be to me?"

Ikkyu answered: "If you think you really come and go, that is your delusion. Let me show you the path on which there is no coming and no going."

With his words, Ikkyu had revealed the path so clearly that Ninakawa smilled and passed away
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:10:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Because I have to write a short paper on the 'high points' of Buddhism, from a philosophical/ethical standpoint.

I don't need history, statistics, or whatnot - just ethical or philosophical stuff.

Anybody?



I find religoustolerance.org to be a good site for unbiased info on religions.

www.religioustolerance.org/buddhism.htm

lots of info and links to Buddhist organizations.

I think we have at least a few Buddhist members here as well, hopefully they will speak up.

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:12:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:
Not Far from Buddhahood

A university student while visiting Gasan asked him: "Have you ever read the Christian Bible?"

"No, read it to me," said Gasan.

The student opened the Bible and read from St. Matthew: "And why take ye thought for rainment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They toil not, neither do they spin, and yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these... Take therefore no thought for the morrow, for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."

Gasan said: "Whoever uttered those words I consider an enlightened man."

The student continued reading: "Ask and it shall be given you, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened."

Gasan remarked: "That is excellent. Whoever said that is not far from Buddhahood."



Which illustrates a misunderstanding on the part of the listener.

A Buddhist would consider detachment from the material world as enlightenment.

However, what Jesus what talking about is not worrying because Yahweh, His Heavenly father, provides all that we need. The teachings of Jesus point to a very personal God.

Also, this is an example of a "buffet"-type reading of selected passages while ignoring others. What would Gasan say to Jesus' words: "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No man comes to the Father except by me?"

Attempting to blend Christianity with any other belief system requires making Christianity less than it is.

However, pursuit of this principle would result in a hijacking of the original topic, so I'll bow out of this thread.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:15:15 AM EDT
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:17:49 AM EDT
the main teaching is not every man for himself....
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:17:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:
Not Far from Buddhahood

A university student while visiting Gasan asked him: "Have you ever read the Christian Bible?"

"No, read it to me," said Gasan.

The student opened the Bible and read from St. Matthew: "And why take ye thought for rainment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They toil not, neither do they spin, and yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these... Take therefore no thought for the morrow, for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."

Gasan said: "Whoever uttered those words I consider an enlightened man."

The student continued reading: "Ask and it shall be given you, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened."

Gasan remarked: "That is excellent. Whoever said that is not far from Buddhahood."



Which illustrates a misunderstanding on the part of the listener.

A Buddhist would consider detachment from the material world as enlightenment.

However, what Jesus what talking about is not worrying because Yahweh, His Heavenly father, provides all that we need. The teachings of Jesus point to a very personal God.

Also, this is an example of a "buffet"-type reading of selected passages while ignoring others. What would Gasan say to Jesus' words: "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No man comes to the Father except by me?"
Attempting to blend Christianity with any other belief system requires making Christianity less than it is.

However, pursuit of this principle would result in a hijacking of the original topic, so I'll bow out of this thread.



Heh heh... Ask AROWNERAGAIN if I have an answer for this. (He doesnt like it very much) Its actually very synergistic.. I wont go into it as I too don't want to hijack this thread that much.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:19:08 AM EDT
With the political leanings of most of the people here, I think most of us would embrace buddhism. Its not a religion only but a way of living on a basic level. Respect your elders, help yourself, do be lazy. So people that need help really need help. And you can be Christian too.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:19:11 AM EDT
"And do you know what the Lama says? Gunga galunga...gunga -- gunga galunga. So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consiousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."



Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:19:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.





People kill people. Even Buddhists.... Do you think those Shaolin monks learned kung-fu for fun?


Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:19:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WyattEarp:
"And do you know what the Lama says? Gunga galunga...gunga -- gunga galunga. So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consiousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."






classic
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:21:47 AM EDT
Here is Buddhism in a nutshell.



A Buddhist monk visits New York City. Seeing a woman selling hot dogs, he asks for "One with everything." The vendor gives him a hot dog, and the Buddhist pays with a $20 bill. When she does not give change he complains, but the hot dog vendor says, "Change must come from within."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:23:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:
Not Far from Buddhahood

A university student while visiting Gasan asked him: "Have you ever read the Christian Bible?"

"No, read it to me," said Gasan.

The student opened the Bible and read from St. Matthew: "And why take ye thought for rainment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They toil not, neither do they spin, and yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these... Take therefore no thought for the morrow, for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."

Gasan said: "Whoever uttered those words I consider an enlightened man."

The student continued reading: "Ask and it shall be given you, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened."

Gasan remarked: "That is excellent. Whoever said that is not far from Buddhahood."



Which illustrates a misunderstanding on the part of the listener.

A Buddhist would consider detachment from the material world as enlightenment.

However, what Jesus what talking about is not worrying because Yahweh, His Heavenly father, provides all that we need. The teachings of Jesus point to a very personal God.

Also, this is an example of a "buffet"-type reading of selected passages while ignoring others. What would Gasan say to Jesus' words: "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No man comes to the Father except by me?"
Attempting to blend Christianity with any other belief system requires making Christianity less than it is.

However, pursuit of this principle would result in a hijacking of the original topic, so I'll bow out of this thread.



Heh heh... Ask AROWNERAGAIN if I have an answer for this. (He doesnt like it very much) Its actually very synergistic.. I wont go into it as I too don't want to hijack this thread that much.



Hijack away.

(my presentation is finished...)

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:25:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.



People kill people. Even Buddhists.... Do you think those Shaolin monks learned kung-fu for fun?



I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:38:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:42:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.



People kill people. Even Buddhists.... Do you think those Shaolin monks learned kung-fu for fun?



I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



my ex was buddhist and he was abusive so I can't say they are all peaceful and gentle.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:45:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."



Shintoists.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:49:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DpC:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.



People kill people. Even Buddhists.... Do you think those Shaolin monks learned kung-fu for fun?



I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



my ex was buddhist and he was abusive so I can't say they are all peaceful and gentle.



queue the "well then he wasn't a REAL Buddhist" line of reasoning I see so often on this board.

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 7:52:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."



Shintoists.



Lots of them were Buddhists as well. Just goes to show you if you have enough hate driving you, its possible to pervert any religion.



Link Posted: 5/23/2005 8:07:41 AM EDT
Wow this is an oppotunity to talk about a rarely spoken topic, Bhuddhism. So here a real cool way I can explain Bhuddhism to an American. Here is a movie that best explain how Bhuddhism works : THE MATRIX! Neo is a person who lives in a dream, a bad dream, everything around him is fake but he does'nt know it. He is enslaved and is expected to live suffer grow old and die in the matrix yet he is not even "aware" of the truth. The Machines (lords of desire and suffering) keep him this way. Then along comes a 'enlightend one' called Morphius (bhudda). (morphius in greek myth was the master of 'dreams') He tells him that he can show him the truth of reality through 'the blue pill' enlightment. He takes it and is "awoken" to the truth of his world! There is no spoon! All is illusion, all is deception all is meant to keep us exsisting so we can be used. So now the 'agents' can be thought of as things in this world like desires, ignorance, false pleasure and also suffering. It is their duty to prevent you from knowing the truth and to prevent you from helping others realise the truth. Remember the scene when they promise the "informer" a life of bliss if he gives them the codes to zion??
Now of course shooting people isn't really bhuddist but it can be a metaphore to using "meditation" to overcome the evils in this world. so Neo goes on his journey to save the human race from the machines. BY shooting the agents! Till one day the agents get the best of him and he dies! But he is then "reborn" with all his knowledge of 'enlightment' and is now able to manipulate the universe so that the agents of suffering and ignorance have no hold on him and he can destroy them, then he goes on to help free every enslaved soul by telling them the truth of the universe.



Also I would like to clarify some things about westerners who claim to be half - christian half-bhuddhist. This is not really possable because of the different "world views" each religion have. In christianity you theology is this , in the begining God created the world and man, then man "disobeyed" God so he got cast into the earth. He was born he lives then he dies, and thats it. You either go to heavan or hell based on your life deeds, with God as judge, he has power over you. Then Jesus came and died. Now if you belive in Jesus you get to go to heavan as your sins are "wiped away" Also you cannot belive in more than one God, you cannot also worship say Zeus or Odin.

The bhuddhist world view is this: The universe exsists, but it has no begining or end. it spins in an eternal wheel. One day the universe will be destroyed, only to be "born again" and start all over again. Their is no real creator God that made man, slavation comes from oneself and not from an external "creator God" who saves you. You are born then you die and are born again (reincarnation) in an infinate amount of lifeforms. You could be a worm or a roach or a whale, some forms are better than others. If you're a human who was bad, youll die and come back as a chipmunk or something . Now in Bhuddhism gods do exsist, they are just another life form. But they too can live and die and be reincarnated. In fact it is possable for a human to become a god like ganesh! But even then eventually you'll die. This cycle goes on forever and ever. UNTIL........... Bhudda came along and taught a way to end this cycle of living and dieing, if you follow his precepts you'll reach Nirvana and never have to be born again ever but will be at peace with the universe.

As you can see these are two totally different "world views"
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 8:11:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DpC:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By WaWaTuSi:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
I've had many interesting conversations with Buddhists but never an altercation with one. I've never had one call me names or insult me or tell me I'm going to be punished for having a different opinion about something than they do.

That puts them in a class separate from Christians, Jews, Muslims, and all other religions I can think of except some Native Americans. I got into a terrible bar argument with a Navajo once.



People kill people. Even Buddhists.... Do you think those Shaolin monks learned kung-fu for fun?



I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



my ex was buddhist and he was abusive so I can't say they are all peaceful and gentle.



Dysfunctional behaviour is a universal human affliction. None of the world's religions make one "proof" against mental illnesses and addictions. Religions exist, in part, as an attempt to find the path AWAY from those scourges.
Regarding Shaolin monks; Buddhism and Taoism are very practical. They do not forbid self defense. If one's life is threatened, one may choose life over death. One is not obligated to passively go to one's doom.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 8:15:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dino:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."



Shintoists.



Lots of them were Buddhists as well. Just goes to show you if you have enough hate driving you, its possible to pervert any religion.






Ummm not really. Anyone who saw the Emporer as "divine" (which was pretty much all of them) was a Shintoists. Buddhisms doesn't believe that Hirohito was a God decendent from Amatersu.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 8:54:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."



They were not Buddhist they were SHINTO...... duh.....
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 9:09:03 AM EDT
Buddhism is by far the most reasonable of all the major religions as far as I'm concerned.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.
-Buddha

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 9:20:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4:
Buddhism is by far the most reasonable of all the major religions as far as I'm concerned.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.
-Buddha





Reasonable, or anarchy?


Judges 21:25
In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 9:56:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 9:57:54 AM EDT by M4]

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Originally Posted By M4:
Buddhism is by far the most reasonable of all the major religions as far as I'm concerned.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.
-Buddha





Reasonable, or anarchy?


Judges 21:25
In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.




I guess that depends on the follower of those words I quoted.

I tend to select a belief system based on how I personally would react to such standards, not how the masses would react.

There are plenty of Christians that, despite the word, live very differently than what they have been told to do.

What I like about the quote is that ultimately, no matter what a book tells you, you are responsible for you. It allows the gift of intellect, experience, logic & common sense to play a significant role and also to adapt to change as changes occure. Many ancient religions simply reject any real modernization or change, despite the glaring reality that life has changed immesurably over thousands of years.

Believe in yourself. Have a code and live by it to your highest standards in the world in which you currently find yourself living.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 9:57:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4:

guess that depends on the follower of those words I quoted.

I tend to select a belief system based on how I personally would react to such standards, not how the masses would react.

There are plenty of Christians that, despite the word, live very differently than what they have been told to do.

What I like about the quote is that ultimately, no matter what a book tells you, you are responsible for you. It allows the gift of intellect, experience, logic & common sense to play a significant role and also to adapt to change as changes occure. Many ancient religions simply reject any real modernization or change, despite the glaring reality that life has changed immesurably over thousands of years.

Believe in yourself. Have a code and live by it to your highest standards.



+1



­
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 10:12:43 AM EDT
The central message of Buddhism is "Every man for himself".
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 10:19:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgredo:
The central message of Buddhism is "Every man for himself".



That appears, on the surface at least, to disregard others...which is not the central message of Buddhism....at all.

Everyone is responsible for him or herself, which doesn't mean "out for themselves."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 10:22:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgredo:
The central message of Buddhism is "Every man for himself".



I beat you to that punch....
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:05:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 11:11:18 AM EDT by Ardenner]

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:


I have NOTHING against killing people who need to be killed. I'm referring to the manner in which I have observed Buddhists treat others who do not share their religious beliefs.



Like the way the Japanese military treated conquered people in WWII (somebody had to say it!)."



Japan has a lot of Shinto as well and Buddhist. Perhaps even more Shinto than Buddhist. Ancestor worship is big there.

ETA- Dalai Lama will be speaking at University of Texas in October for anyone in Austin that is interested. He is a pretty fascinating person. I have never seen him in person but one of my professors has interviewed him a couple times and I've seen him on tape and read transcripts.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:19:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WyattEarp:
"And do you know what the Lama says? Gunga galunga...gunga -- gunga galunga. So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consiousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."




"Big hitter, the Lama. Long."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:28:44 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:38:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4:

Originally Posted By mcgredo:
The central message of Buddhism is "Every man for himself".



That appears, on the surface at least, to disregard others...which is not the central message of Buddhism....at all.

Everyone is responsible for him or herself, which doesn't mean "out for themselves."



Otto, "A Fish Called Wanda".

"I used to box for Oxford"
"Oh yeah? Well, I used to kill for the CIA."
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 1:38:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 1:39:37 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
There IS that whole crazy gasoline thing....


www.geocities.com/tcartz/monkonfire.jpg



Now THOSE were Buddhists. You got the right guys.

And there is certainly evidence of barbaric Buddhists. Even if the Japanese of WWII were NOT Buddhists a LOT of Vietnimese were. Now I know "offically" they were communists and idiots would have you believe there is no religion in communist countries (No Russian orthodox in the Soviet Union, Catholics in Cuba or Buddhists/Toaists in China) but that is hardly the truth.

The reality is many Vietnamese and North Korean were Buddhists and did some savagely barbaric shit.

ETA: Now if only OUR hippie, liberal anti war protestors lit themselved on fire.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 1:39:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
There IS that whole crazy gasoline thing....


www.geocities.com/tcartz/monkonfire.jpg



Now THOSE were Buddhists. You got the right guys.

And there is certainly evidence of barbaric Buddhists. Even if the Japanese of WWII were NOT Buddhists a LOT of Vietnimese were. Now I know "offically" they were communists and idiots would have you believe there is no religion in communist countries (No Russian orthodox in the Soviet Union, Catholics in Cuba or Buddhists/Toaists in China) but that is hardly the truth.

The reality is many Vietnamese and North Korean were Buddhists and did some savagely barbaric shit.



Tell me more about buddhism in countries that claim to have no religion......

Link Posted: 5/23/2005 1:40:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
I've never met one that wasn't very polite and respectful. All I know.



+1 never had any problems with Buddhist other than their english isn't always the best, but hey at least they are trying to speak English.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 1:52:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 1:53:23 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
There IS that whole crazy gasoline thing....


www.geocities.com/tcartz/monkonfire.jpg



Now THOSE were Buddhists. You got the right guys.

And there is certainly evidence of barbaric Buddhists. Even if the Japanese of WWII were NOT Buddhists a LOT of Vietnimese were. Now I know "offically" they were communists and idiots would have you believe there is no religion in communist countries (No Russian orthodox in the Soviet Union, Catholics in Cuba or Buddhists/Toaists in China) but that is hardly the truth.

The reality is many Vietnamese and North Korean were Buddhists and did some savagely barbaric shit.



Tell me more about buddhism in countries that claim to have no religion......




While not officially sanctioned or promoted in communist countries Buddhism is probably the most popular religion in Vietnam, North Korea and China. Chinese people today practice sort of a blend of religions. Being as Toaism and Confucianism are more correctly "philosophies" they were still eventually combined with tennets of Buddhism to become "religions" and it is entirely common for a Chinese person to observe all three with little or no conflict.

Even though Taoism is seemingly at odds with Confucian ideas it is the Taoist idea of complementing opposites coexisting (Yin/Yang) that permits such a contradiction of beliefs.

It is unknown exactly what percentages of the populations of these countries observe these religions and it is probably not in the governments best interest to make such a survey but to let sleeping dogs lie. It should be noted that these religions absolutely were repressed when communism was introduced, especially in China's "cultural revolution" where many people were tortured and executed for not adapting. And the practice of these religions was very much underground for some time.

But today in China they can be practiced more or less in the open without undue persecution. The same is more or less true in Vietnam and North Korea as well.
Top Top