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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/11/2005 6:32:17 PM EDT
Just got this story from a friend. Its quite moving.
I've attached some of the pics asociated with the story.

Subject: SOLDIER'S FUNERAL, TEXAS STYLE


What follows is a message from Vicki Pierce about her nephew James' funeral (he was serving our country in Iraq):

"I'm back, it was certainly a quick trip, but I have to also say it was one of the most amazing experiences of my life. There is a lot to be said for growing up in a small town in Texas.

The service itself was impressive with wonderful flowers and sprays, a portrait of James, his uniform and boots, his awards and ribbons. There was lots of military brass and an eloquent (though inappropriately longwinded) Baptist preacher. There were easily 1000 people at the service, filling the church sanctuary as well as the fellowship hall and spilling out into the parking lot.

However, the most incredible thing was what happened following the service on the way to the cemetery. We went to our cars and drove to the cemetery escorted by at least 10 police cars with lights flashing and some other emergency vehicles, with Texas Rangers handling traffic. Everyone on the road who was not in the procession, pulled over, got out of their cars, and stood silently and respectfully, some put their hands over their hearts, some had small flags. Shop keepers came outside with their customers and did the same thing. Construction workers stopped their work, got off their equipment and put their hands over their hearts, too. There was no noise whatsoever except a few birds and the quiet hum of cars going slowly up the road.

When we turned off the highway suddenly there were teenage boys along both sides of the street about every 20 feet or so, all holding large American flags on long flag poles, and again with their hands on their hearts. We thought at first it was the Boy Scouts or 4H club or something, but it continued .... for two and a half miles. Hundreds of young people, standing silently on the side of the road with flags. At one point we passed an elementary school, and all the children were outside, shoulder to shoulder holding flags ... kindergartners, handicapped, teachers, staff, everyone. Some held signs of love and support. Then came teenage girls and younger boys, all holding flags. Then adults. Then families. All standing silently on the side of the road. No one spoke, not even the very young children. The last few turns found people crowded together holding flags or with their hands on their hearts. Some were on horseback.

The military presence..at least two generals, a fist full of colonels, and representatives from every branch of the service, plus the color guard which attended James, and some who served with him ... was very impressive and respectful, but the love and pride from this community who had lost one of their own was the most amazing thing I've ever been privileged to witness.






Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:37:55 PM EDT
May he rest in peace. He has earned his reward. Thank you for sharing the outpouring of honor bestowed upon him by the community.

De Oppresso Liber
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:43:05 PM EDT


Ben
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:47:05 PM EDT
That gave me chills and goosebumps. Welcome to Texas.

RIP, James.



Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:47:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lifesaver:
May he rest in peace. He has earned his reward. Thank you for sharing the outpouring of honor bestowed upon him by the community.

De Oppresso Liber



Agreed, and with the gratitude that this happened in Texas.

Had this been Massachusetts, there would have been hippies painted green protesting with picket signs.
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:51:18 PM EDT
*sniffle*




Makes me think of this song:


I never thought that this is where I'd settle down.
I thought I'd die an old man back in my hometown.
They gave me this plot of land,
Me and some other men, for a job well done.
There's a big White House sits on a hill just up the road.
The man inside, he cried the day they brought me home.
They folded up a flag and told my Mom and Dad:
"We're proud of your son."
And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property.
I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company.
I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done.
I can rest in peace;
I'm one of the chosen ones:
I made it to Arlington.
I remember Daddy brought me here when I was eight.
We searched all day to find out where my grand-dad lay.
And when we finally found that cross,
He said: "Son, this is what it cost to keep us free."
Now here I am, a thousand stones away from him.
He recognized me on the first day I came in.
And it gave me a chill when he clicked his heels,
And saluted me.
And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property.
I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company.
I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done.
I can rest in peace;
I'm one of the chosen ones:
I made it to Arlington.
And everytime I hear twenty-one guns,
I know they brought another hero home to us.
And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property.
I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company.
We're thankful for those thankful for the things we've done.
We can rest in peace;
'Cause we are the chosen ones:
We made it to Arlington.
Yeah, dust to dust,
Don't cry for us:
We made it to Arlington.

Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:52:42 PM EDT
Not that it takes anything from the story... but that is old and has been going around the net for quite awhile.

Just making it known that it isn't recent.
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 6:55:32 PM EDT



I got choked up here reading that, and seeing the pictures...
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 7:12:35 PM EDT
RIP
Link Posted: 7/11/2005 7:15:13 PM EDT
I know what State I'm moving to when I retire...
Link Posted: 8/3/2005 1:05:39 PM EDT
bump just cause
Link Posted: 8/3/2005 1:09:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/3/2005 1:10:28 PM EDT by Epsilon]
Wow...very touching.

Makes me even prouder to be a Texan.


What town in Texas was this?
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