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Posted: 10/20/2004 7:41:43 PM EST
Which is correct?

Water freezes at 32 degrees farenheit.

Ice melts at 32 degrees farenheit.

Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:44:47 PM EST
Yes
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:47:30 PM EST
both the freezing point is also the melting point because both are occuring at the same time
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:48:19 PM EST
maybe
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:49:52 PM EST
Westerners say "I'm coming"

Japanese say "I'm going".

Which is correct?
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:52:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By Takakuraken:
Westerners say "I'm coming"

Japanese say "I'm going".

Which is correct?




To come, does not mean the same as To go.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:53:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By clean_cut:

Originally Posted By Takakuraken:
Westerners say "I'm coming"

Japanese say "I'm going".

Which is correct?




To come, does not mean the same as To go.



Well, in the right context, i dont think anyone gives a shit.



- BG
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:55:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/20/2004 7:56:10 PM EST by clean_cut]

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:

Originally Posted By clean_cut:

Originally Posted By Takakuraken:
Westerners say "I'm coming"

Japanese say "I'm going".

Which is correct?




To come, does not mean the same as To go.



Well, in the right context, i dont think anyone gives a shit.



- BG




When someone says, "I need to come" does not mean the same thing as when they say, "I need to go."
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:57:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By ajm1911:
both the freezing point is also the melting point because both are occuring at the same time



An educated one. Yes sir. It depends on which direction you're coming from.

If ice moves from 31 to 32 degrees, it starts melting.

If water moves from 33 to 32 degrees, it starts freezing.

Just a trivia question.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:59:38 PM EST
Don't you guys ever watch Japanese porn?

Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:59:41 PM EST
Ice or water at 32 degrees requires a specific amount of energy per mass to melt or freeze, called the latent heat of fusion.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:59:57 PM EST
The phase transition point (liquid/solid) for water is at 32 degrees F. Actually melting point is used scientifically and not freezing point.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:01:24 PM EST
Well, according to Scripture.......

...only kidding.

The answer to question has already been given. "YES".
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:10:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By ajm1911:
both the freezing point is also the melting point because both are occuring at the same time



An educated one. Yes sir. It depends on which direction you're coming from.

If ice moves from 31 to 32 degrees, it starts melting.

If water moves from 33 to 32 degrees, it starts freezing.

Just a trivia question.



Liquid water won't go below 32 F. It becomes crystalized (ice) if it continues to lose heat to the surrounding medium.

Likewise, "ice" won't go above 32 F. It becomes water if it gains more heat.


Disclaimer: But there are unusual circumstances when "water" can be forced to go below 32F or even go above boiling temp and still exist as liquid water.

Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:13:12 PM EST
Subject for new thread:

Reaching climax:

English: coming
Japanese: (iku) going

Why?
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:16:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By The_Macallan:

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By ajm1911:
both the freezing point is also the melting point because both are occuring at the same time



An educated one. Yes sir. It depends on which direction you're coming from.

If ice moves from 31 to 32 degrees, it starts melting.

If water moves from 33 to 32 degrees, it starts freezing.

Just a trivia question.



Liquid water won't go below 32 F. It becomes crystalized (ice) if it continues to lose heat to the surrounding medium.

Likewise, "ice" won't go above 32 F. It becomes water if it gains more heat.


Disclaimer: But there are unusual circumstances when "water" can be forced to go below 32F or even go above boiling temp and still exist as liquid water.




unusual as in being at some condition other than standard temp and pressure (STP)?

then there is sublimation

Sin_Bin whats up with the weird questions



Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:17:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By The_Macallan:

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By ajm1911:
both the freezing point is also the melting point because both are occuring at the same time



An educated one. Yes sir. It depends on which direction you're coming from.

If ice moves from 31 to 32 degrees, it starts melting.

If water moves from 33 to 32 degrees, it starts freezing.

Just a trivia question.



Liquid water won't go below 32 F. It becomes crystalized (ice) if it continues to lose heat to the surrounding medium.

Likewise, "ice" won't go above 32 F. It becomes water if it gains more heat.


Disclaimer: But there are unusual circumstances when "water" can be forced to go below 32F or even go above boiling temp and still exist as liquid water.




This is also assuming sea level.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:20:27 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:21:55 PM EST
uh, "thank you"
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:22:07 PM EST
The lingo in therodynamics would call it a "phase change" which covers both of those

-Foxxz
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:23:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dino:
Sin_Bin whats up with the weird questions




Just popped into my head. Something that was discussed in my basic Chemistry class.



Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:25:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
The phase transition point (liquid/solid) for water is at 32 degrees F. Actually melting point is used scientifically and not freezing point.



My high school physics teacher always used to say, "There's no such thing as cold."[
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 8:45:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By Takakuraken:
Don't you guys ever watch Japanese porn?




They make Japanese Porn?
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:03:40 PM EST
i do beleve the answer is 0 degrees C.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:07:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By grizzlyarms:
i do beleve the answer is 0 degrees C.



Well then...if it's zero degrees today and it's going to be twice as cold tomorrow, what's the tempurature going to be?

Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:08:32 PM EST
and none of you scientists are using the Kelvin scale?
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:10:45 PM EST
Viewed as heat not coldness. H20 changes phases from a solid to a liquid at 32 F.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:16:07 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:18:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By ColonelKlink:
water is a liquid if t > 32 and a solid if t < 32.



Correct.


Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:24:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/20/2004 9:25:09 PM EST by gotodengo]

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By ColonelKlink:
water is a liquid if t > 32 and a solid if t < 32.



Correct.





at sea level. and the diff between melting and freezing is "latent heat" apparent heat can be measured. latent heat is the heat stored that can not be measured with a thermometer.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:26:06 PM EST
Ice is cold.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:31:16 PM EST
ice is crunchy and water isnt.


dont looks to far into it
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:34:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/20/2004 9:34:44 PM EST by ColonelKlink]
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:48:47 PM EST
neither.

water at 32*F will remain water until more heat energy is taken away and the molecules slow down enough to solidify

ice at 32*F will remain ice until more heat energy is added to it melt it.

if ice water is kept at exactly 32*F, the water will remain water and the ice will remain ice.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 9:55:12 PM EST
You have a platoon off men marching near marching off a cliff(one foot from the edge)!

What command would you give,and not lose a single man???


Bob
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:00:23 AM EST
Ice is water.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:19:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By QuantumPion:
Ice or water at 32 degrees requires a specific amount of energy per mass to melt or freeze, called the latent heat of fusion.



That's it, you can have ice or water at 32 degrees F, if you add or remove energy, you can get it to change states. I can't remeber what the actual number is for the transformation, but I do believe it can be measured in calories.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:22:31 AM EST
You are still using Farenheight...and you think we are backwards!

Scientific questions should be asked using scientific units!
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:28:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 4:30:22 AM EST by Greenhorn]
All water will melt at 32 degrees farneheit (though because of latent heat, you actually have to add extra energy to actually make the molecules come apart).

But 32 degrees is not necessarily the freezing point. When planes high in the atmosphere start collecting ice on the wings, it is because of super-cooled water droplets. They are actually much colder than 32 degrees, but don't freeze until they come in contact with something.

I think I heard that some high-altitude water droplets, such as in a thunderstorm, can be as cold as -8 degrees and not freeze, though I might be wrong on the exact temperature.

Overview: 32 degrees Farenheit is the melting point, but NOT the freezing point. There is no fixed freezing point.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:33:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By bobbyjack:
You have a platoon off men marching near marching off a cliff(one foot from the edge)!

What command would you give,and not lose a single man???


Bob



Halt.


or, if you had two steps, Rear, March!
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 5:00:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:
Which is correct?

Water freezes at 32 degrees farenheit.

Ice melts at 32 degrees farenheit.




Neither is correct. They are both approximations.

The freezing point of pure water at one atmosphere pressure is 32 F. The freezing point is the solid and liquid phases exist in equilibrium.


It is no big trick to change the freezing point of water. All you have to do is dissolve something in it. Common examples: Salt on roadways, ethylene glycol in your radiator, and sugar in ice cream.

Even pure water will go slightly below 32 F without freezing if there is nothing to seed the crystallization.
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