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Posted: 9/5/2014 10:37:00 AM EST
I found a couple of links that have some detailed rocket pics that can be printed in poster size. I'm thinking of taking the files down to the printers' and having a copy of them made to hand on the wall of the shop/mancave.

Saturn V - Apollo configuration

NASA facts 33

Also, check out the website, lots of cool stuff there!
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:39:35 AM EST
Mmmm....
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:40:12 AM EST
Awesome! Thanks for posting.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:44:40 AM EST
Hell yeah. 'Murica.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:45:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/5/2014 10:47:14 AM EST by Frank_B]
Those will look good on the wall of your man-cave.

The Saturn V is big, but to me the Saturn 1b had more eye appeal:



I watched many of them lift off, some from near the launch pads and some from in the firing rooms.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:58:53 AM EST
Neat!
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 11:44:22 AM EST
If you don't mind taping pages together, try printing it at home with this
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 11:48:25 AM EST
Nice, thanks for posting
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 11:52:56 AM EST


The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 11:58:13 AM EST
You can actually get a huge amount of the old technical documentation online, as well.

Saturn 5 flight manual
Saturn 5 press kit
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle GNC description

Much, much more is out there as well.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 12:47:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrFisher:
You can actually get a huge amount of the old technical documentation online, as well.

Saturn 5 flight manual
Saturn 5 press kit
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle GNC description

Much, much more is out there as well.
View Quote

I've got the flight manual download. That particular one is configured for Apollo VIII
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 1:18:28 PM EST
It's funny. Having seen Saturn V launch inspired one kind of awe.
Getting within a couple of dozen feet of Saturn V flight hardware, another kind of awe.
Seeing the numbers on that poster... the first stage alone weighed over FIVE MILLION pounds when fuelled! FuuUUUuuuuUUUuuuuck!

'Murica, Fuck YEAH!
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 1:28:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SpanishInquisition:
It's funny. Having seen Saturn V launch inspired one kind of awe.
Getting within a couple of dozen feet of Saturn V flight hardware, another kind of awe.
Seeing the numbers on that poster... the first stage alone weighed over FIVE MILLION pounds when fuelled! FuuUUUuuuuUUUuuuuck!

'Murica, Fuck YEAH!
View Quote



The moon landings were the greatest thing we have ever done as a species. Without qualification.

In 1900 mankind moved around the Earth via horse and carriage. 70 years later, we literally touched the face of one of man's former gods.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 1:33:59 PM EST
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 2:09:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).
View Quote



Fuck yeah - rope core. I really want some of that.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 2:22:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/5/2014 2:23:14 PM EST by cyclone]
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.
View Quote

Link Posted: 9/5/2014 2:30:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life



View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.


Last launch of a Saturn V
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 2:32:42 PM EST
Thanks for the link!
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 2:33:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.
View Quote


I'm planning on making a trip out of an SLS launch if it ever gets to the launch pad. Especially the Block II variant which supposedly could surpass the Saturn V in lift capability.

Link Posted: 9/5/2014 3:15:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:
I found a couple of links that have some detailed rocket pics that can be printed in poster size. I'm thinking of taking the files down to the printers' and having a copy of them made to hand on the wall of the shop/mancave.

Saturn V - Apollo configuration

NASA facts 33

Also, check out the website, lots of cool stuff there!
View Quote


And what's the name of the company on the drawing for the Saturn V drawing? Boeing.

Makes me proud that I worked +32 years for them. I knew a bunch of old engineers at the Kent Space Center that worked the Apollo and follow-on programs.




Link Posted: 9/5/2014 3:49:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/5/2014 3:52:41 PM EST by Frank_B]
Many of the aircraft companies were contracted by NASA; Boeing, Lockheed, Pan Am...

Marion Power Shovel built the crawler-transporter. Awesome beast, it was another engineering masterpiece.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 3:56:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).
View Quote


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:02:43 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Element94:


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.
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Originally Posted By Element94:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.
At home? Hell probably in your smart phone. Not to mention integrated GPS, communications, display...
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:09:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Element94:


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By Element94:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.

You probably forgot a zero or four in that figure.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:12:13 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life



View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:33:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrFisher:
You can actually get a huge amount of the old technical documentation online, as well.

Saturn 5 flight manual
Saturn 5 press kit
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle GNC description

Much, much more is out there as well.
View Quote


Been reading the flight manual........I love how the launch facility floor plan has one restroom in the lobby; it is simply labeled "MEN"
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:43:21 PM EST
Awesome. I'm saving that to print someday.

The Apollo program is, without a doubt, the most impressive human accomplishment of all time. Unfortunately I'm too young to have witnessed it.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:50:29 PM EST
Having grown up in Florida and on the opposite coast, I remember watching most of the launches. We could see the rockets (and later the shuttles) rising like a big flare into the sky. My dad took us over to KSC just before Apollo 15 and I remember seeing it sitting out on the pad. This was back in the days when they took tours inside the VAB while they were working on stuff. I also remember seeing either the Apollo 12 or 14 capsule sitting in the VAB and how burned it was.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 4:54:55 PM EST
Thanks OP.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 5:17:07 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SpanishInquisition:
It's funny. Having seen Saturn V launch inspired one kind of awe.
Getting within a couple of dozen feet of Saturn V flight hardware, another kind of awe.
Seeing the numbers on that poster... the first stage alone weighed over FIVE MILLION pounds when fuelled! FuuUUUuuuuUUUuuuuck!

'Murica, Fuck YEAH!
View Quote

If you really want something awe inspiring, consider the energy of the Saturn V.... in kilotons. Then you'll understand why the launch pad was miles away from anything else.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 5:22:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:


How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?

I don't know how much the noise had dissipated by the time it reached any viewing areas (I'm sure atmospheric conditions of the day would have been a factor also) but I read somewhere that the noise at the pad was well in excess of 200 dB.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 5:41:47 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Alien:

You probably forgot a zero or four in that figure.
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Originally Posted By Alien:
Originally Posted By Element94:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.

You probably forgot a zero or four in that figure.


For the sake of rocket nerdery everywhere, exactly how much processing power did the ground based NASA comps have combined?
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 5:43:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).
View Quote


I'm sure that is amazing (most aspects of the space program was) but can you explain that a little more?
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 5:45:23 PM EST
Candle of the Gods
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 6:04:21 PM EST
core rope
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AR45fan:


I'm sure that is amazing (most aspects of the space program was) but can you explain that a little more?
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Originally Posted By AR45fan:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).


I'm sure that is amazing (most aspects of the space program was) but can you explain that a little more?

Link Posted: 9/5/2014 7:16:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AR45fan:

I'm sure that is amazing (most aspects of the space program was) but can you explain that a little more?
View Quote


He means that in 1966 or so, they designed the equivalent of a modest scientific calculator, and it fit inside the volume of roughly 4 shoe boxes.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 7:26:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:

I don't know how much the noise had dissipated by the time it reached any viewing areas (I'm sure atmospheric conditions of the day would have been a factor also) but I read somewhere that the noise at the pad was well in excess of 200 dB.
View Quote


The engines were more than rock concert loud at the viewing area. LOUD. But it wasn't just your ears. You felt this shit on your rib cage as the pressure waves of power to send men to the frakkin' moon wanted to equalize pressure with the stuff you breathed in before it lit off and then you forgot to keep breathing while watching this wonder. Many years later, when I threw my first real grenade, I felt the same compression on my rib cage, but it wasn't sustained like the Saturn's voice, but only a fleeting thump.

After that, the very ground objected to man leaving its hold. 7.5 million pounds of thrust were hitting the ground 3.1 miles away, and that shock wave then reached your feet. I had never been in an earthquake then, but I'd call it a magnitude 4 maybe.

The bird was well on its way, but there was one final assault she could give. couple of sharp CRACKs sounded as it broke mach 1.


What I would give to follow the trail those men blazed.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 8:06:24 PM EST
SpanishInquisition just gave me the weirdest boner...

I cried after a little..
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 8:25:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BigCat1911:
At home? Hell probably in your smart phone. Not to mention integrated GPS, communications, display...
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Originally Posted By BigCat1911:
Originally Posted By Element94:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).


And with that we went to the Moon five times. Now each one of us possess at home 100x the entire computing power NASA had in 1969, and we cant get there.
At home? Hell probably in your smart phone. Not to mention integrated GPS, communications, display...


Didn't have to be, analog vs digital.
Lot less is necessary in a analog computer.

RE: the ground mainframes:
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/04/50-years-ago-ibm-created-mainframe-that-helped-bring-men-to-the-moon/

So for $5million NASA got 1Mb ram and 0.75MIPS (or 750,000 instructions per second)

That sells for about $5 today.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 8:45:47 PM EST
It was a thunderingly beautiful experience—voluptuous, sexual, dangerous, and expensive as hell.

—---- Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Playboy magazine interview, regards the Apollo launches, July 1973.


Vonnegut wrote a short story about going to the launch of Apollo XI. I remember he said is was really sexual experience watching the blast off. I have to dig the book out.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 9:02:33 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mister44:



Fuck yeah - rope core. I really want some of that.
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Originally Posted By Mister44:
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
http://drhart.ucoz.com/Mainframe/rope_Plate_18.jpg

The Block II Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) used 36,864 sixteen-bit words of core rope memory (placed within one cubic foot) and 4,096 words of magnetic core memory (within two cubic feet).



Fuck yeah - rope core. I really want some of that.


If some bright, nerdy, maker-type hasn't built some rope-core memory components and is interfacing it to his computer via USB I'll be kind of surprised.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 9:08:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:

I've got the flight manual download. That particular one is configured for Apollo VIII
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Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:
Originally Posted By MrFisher:
You can actually get a huge amount of the old technical documentation online, as well.

Saturn 5 flight manual
Saturn 5 press kit
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle GNC description

Much, much more is out there as well.

I've got the flight manual download. That particular one is configured for Apollo VIII


I have an original copy of the flight manual. Was given to me when I was a kid by a family friend who was an engineer who worked on the Apollo program.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 9:31:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrFisher:



The moon landings were the greatest thing we have ever done as a species. Without qualification.

In 1900 mankind moved around the Earth via horse and carriage. 70 years later, we literally touched the face of one of man's former gods.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrFisher:
Originally Posted By SpanishInquisition:
It's funny. Having seen Saturn V launch inspired one kind of awe.
Getting within a couple of dozen feet of Saturn V flight hardware, another kind of awe.
Seeing the numbers on that poster... the first stage alone weighed over FIVE MILLION pounds when fuelled! FuuUUUuuuuUUUuuuuck!

'Murica, Fuck YEAH!



The moon landings were the greatest thing we have ever done as a species. Without qualification.

In 1900 mankind moved around the Earth via horse and carriage. 70 years later, we literally touched the face of one of man's former gods.

Well said. In less than 10 years we went from the first manned space flight to routine missions to the moon.
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 9:51:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:


How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?
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Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?

Lets put it this way. HDNet partnered with NASA to capture excellent shuttle launch footage that I watched on DirecTV. HDNet used high sound pressure level mics. and still had to place them in a bucket of sand to keep from destroying them at launch such as the shots at 1:30 in this video. I am sure the Saturn rockets were louder than the shuttle but Saturn was before my time.


Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:06:18 PM EST
how hard would it be to resurrect the Saturn?

Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:15:02 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cobalt135:

Lets put it this way. HDNet partnered with NASA to capture excellent shuttle launch footage that I watched on DirecTV. HDNet used high sound pressure level mics. and still had to place them in a bucket of sand to keep from destroying them at launch such as the shots at 1:30 in this video. I am sure the Saturn rockets were louder than the shuttle but Saturn was before my time.


http://youtu.be/xIoRWIgzvbM

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Originally Posted By Cobalt135:
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?

Lets put it this way. HDNet partnered with NASA to capture excellent shuttle launch footage that I watched on DirecTV. HDNet used high sound pressure level mics. and still had to place them in a bucket of sand to keep from destroying them at launch such as the shots at 1:30 in this video. I am sure the Saturn rockets were louder than the shuttle but Saturn was before my time.


http://youtu.be/xIoRWIgzvbM



Shuttle came in around 175db..

Saturn V tipped the scales at 220db..

Sound pressure doubles every 3 db...

Plus the shuttle gets off the pad screaming fast vs Saturn V.. The big rocket had to be close to the ground for longer at its most dangerous point with that sound bouncing off the ground and shaking the piss out of the frame like an OD'ing hooker..

Without the water it wouldn't be survivable for those riding it..
Link Posted: 9/5/2014 10:35:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Frank_B:
Those will look good on the wall of your man-cave.

The Saturn V is big, but to me the Saturn 1b had more eye appeal:

http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/missions/Images/apollo_7_night.jpg

I watched many of them lift off, some from near the launch pads and some from in the firing rooms.
View Quote
Also, the Saturn 1B was a Chrysler.

Makes me think how close we were to having an Imperial Starliner...
Link Posted: 9/6/2014 5:48:19 AM EST
I was not at the Cape, but a few miles away, up the coast................the sound started off as a low rumble then picked up as the shock wave came up the coast...........when it got to where we were it was like a continuous roar.............a wave of sound as it were. It was louder than anything I had heard, and to compare it to a train would be an injustice to the power of the Saturn V

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:


How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?
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Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?

Link Posted: 9/6/2014 5:54:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/6/2014 6:08:20 AM EST by truculenity]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:

I don't know how much the noise had dissipated by the time it reached any viewing areas (I'm sure atmospheric conditions of the day would have been a factor also) but I read somewhere that the noise at the pad was well in excess of 200 dB.
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Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
I was in Florida and got to see Skylab launched when I was a kid...............one of the loudest things I have ever heard in my life


Originally Posted By NwG:
Most impressive, most powerful, loudest, least fuel effecent machine ever built..

Also, its damn sexy.. Wish I was around to see one launch.



How far away were you?

And loud as in ear splitting, or loud like a freight train? Both?

I don't know how much the noise had dissipated by the time it reached any viewing areas (I'm sure atmospheric conditions of the day would have been a factor also) but I read somewhere that the noise at the pad was well in excess of 200 dB.


SLS is to be louder than the Saturn V
Link Posted: 9/6/2014 6:06:21 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SpanishInquisition:


The engines were more than rock concert loud at the viewing area. LOUD. But it wasn't just your ears. You felt this shit on your rib cage as the pressure waves of power to send men to the frakkin' moon wanted to equalize pressure with the stuff you breathed in before it lit off and then you forgot to keep breathing while watching this wonder. Many years later, when I threw my first real grenade, I felt the same compression on my rib cage, but it wasn't sustained like the Saturn's voice, but only a fleeting thump.

After that, the very ground objected to man leaving its hold. 7.5 million pounds of thrust were hitting the ground 3.1 miles away, and that shock wave then reached your feet. I had never been in an earthquake then, but I'd call it a magnitude 4 maybe.

The bird was well on its way, but there was one final assault she could give. couple of sharp CRACKs sounded as it broke mach 1.


What I would give to follow the trail those men blazed.
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Originally Posted By SpanishInquisition:
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:

I don't know how much the noise had dissipated by the time it reached any viewing areas (I'm sure atmospheric conditions of the day would have been a factor also) but I read somewhere that the noise at the pad was well in excess of 200 dB.


The engines were more than rock concert loud at the viewing area. LOUD. But it wasn't just your ears. You felt this shit on your rib cage as the pressure waves of power to send men to the frakkin' moon wanted to equalize pressure with the stuff you breathed in before it lit off and then you forgot to keep breathing while watching this wonder. Many years later, when I threw my first real grenade, I felt the same compression on my rib cage, but it wasn't sustained like the Saturn's voice, but only a fleeting thump.

After that, the very ground objected to man leaving its hold. 7.5 million pounds of thrust were hitting the ground 3.1 miles away, and that shock wave then reached your feet. I had never been in an earthquake then, but I'd call it a magnitude 4 maybe.

The bird was well on its way, but there was one final assault she could give. couple of sharp CRACKs sounded as it broke mach 1.


What I would give to follow the trail those men blazed.


THAT IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL!!!
Link Posted: 9/6/2014 6:08:58 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Frank_B:
Those will look good on the wall of your man-cave.

The Saturn V is big, but to me the Saturn 1b had more eye appeal:

http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/missions/Images/apollo_7_night.jpg

I watched many of them lift off, some from near the launch pads and some from in the firing rooms.
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Tell me about the firing rooms
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