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Posted: 8/11/2014 10:12:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2014 5:44:35 PM EDT by CTM1]
Belonged to my gradfather who was a Marine who served in the Pacific during WWII and on Midway.
He passed at the age of 91, still a Marine through and through. Still Marched in the parades and was very active in his VFW until the broken hip did him in.
He mentioned that he had someone look at it a decade or so ago and they said it was handmade and worth $5k at the time.
I have the handle parts the SEPPA, TSUBA but not the grip (TSUKA) as that deteriorated long ago.
I did a little reading on various boards but was wondering if someone could interpret the writing MEI as I came up empty.
There is no blood groove and I cannot see a Hamon and have no desire to spend what it takes to polish it if it is not the real deal.
I have the scabbard (Saya) but it is WWII
The blade has a slight curve when looking down the length, cannot remember if left or right but I read that may further indicate handmade.
Thanks



Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:13:48 AM EDT
Paging DK Prof to the white courtesy phone
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:17:07 AM EDT
Tagged for interest
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:21:12 AM EDT
thats a Hattori Hanzo!
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:23:06 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
thats a Hattori Hanzo!
View Quote


you must have pretty big rats if you need hattori hanzo steel
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:23:29 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
thats a Hattori Hanzo!
View Quote

Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:25:18 AM EDT
"One gen-u-ine hari kari knife. Maybe some of you have a use for it. Feel free to pass it around."
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:30:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 10:35:23 AM EDT by DK-Prof]
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:34:59 AM EDT
Is op on the way to Walmart to buy watermelons? I hope so.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:39:25 AM EDT
Pics of the blade look like it may have a grain pattern which would be a good sign. Could be some kind of photo artifact since there is not close up on the blade.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:40:17 AM EDT
IBIT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:40:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 10:41:01 AM EDT by StewartTR]
The other side of the Tang should have the date on it. In Japanese not numbers.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:41:20 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:42:28 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Nice

More pictures of the tang would be very helpful.

At first glance, I'd guess it's a WW2 production sword - based on the appearance of the tang, but that could just be reflection making me think the tang is newer.

If it is ww2 production, it becomes a question of HOW handmade it is - understood in the sense that there are mass-produced "hand made" swords from ww2 which are not particlarly desireable or collectible (worth maybe $1000-1200 or so), there are decently made "hand made" swords from ww2 which were made properly by relatively skilled smiths, which are somewhat desired by collectors (worth maybe $1600-$3000), and then there are highly desirable "hand made" blades made by famous smiths that can be worth considerably more. Examples of these can include Yasukuni Shrine swords, that many collectors really like, and can cost a lot of money.

Ultimately you will want to set up an account over at the Nihonto Message Board, and post detailed pictures of the tang. Those guys over there will be able to translate the inscription and tell you when it was made and who made it. That will then give you a good idea of whether or not you want to spend the money on a polish to get it properly restored.

View Quote


I had read a little over their but am almost afraid to step in. When I am back at the house I will try to get better pics of the tang.
I read enough not to mess with the rust on the tang and the blade has a clear grease on it. When my grandparents moved from NY to Cali he tucked it up in the rafters of his garage where it sat for 41 years, thankfuly they had no humidity.
Thanks
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:43:24 AM EDT
This will give you a little bit of understanding on the markings.


http://quanonline.com/military/military_reference/japanese/signatures.html
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:44:04 AM EDT
Tang says Shintaro Ginsu made that, and he tested it on a tin can before slicing a ripe tomato.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:45:03 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By THE_BUSHMAN:
This will give you a little bit of understanding on the markings.


http://quanonline.com/military/military_reference/japanese/signatures.html
View Quote

Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:45:13 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CTM1:


I had read a little over their but am almost afraid to step in.
When I am back at the house I will try to get better pics of the tang.
I read enough not to mess with the rust on the tang and the blade has a clear grease on it. When my grandparents moved from NY to Cali he tucked it up in the rafters of his garage where it sat for 41 years, thankfuly they had no humidity.
Thanks
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CTM1:
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Nice

More pictures of the tang would be very helpful.

At first glance, I'd guess it's a WW2 production sword - based on the appearance of the tang, but that could just be reflection making me think the tang is newer.

If it is ww2 production, it becomes a question of HOW handmade it is - understood in the sense that there are mass-produced "hand made" swords from ww2 which are not particlarly desireable or collectible (worth maybe $1000-1200 or so), there are decently made "hand made" swords from ww2 which were made properly by relatively skilled smiths, which are somewhat desired by collectors (worth maybe $1600-$3000), and then there are highly desirable "hand made" blades made by famous smiths that can be worth considerably more. Examples of these can include Yasukuni Shrine swords, that many collectors really like, and can cost a lot of money.

Ultimately you will want to set up an account over at the Nihonto Message Board, and post detailed pictures of the tang. Those guys over there will be able to translate the inscription and tell you when it was made and who made it. That will then give you a good idea of whether or not you want to spend the money on a polish to get it properly restored.



I had read a little over their but am almost afraid to step in.
When I am back at the house I will try to get better pics of the tang.
I read enough not to mess with the rust on the tang and the blade has a clear grease on it. When my grandparents moved from NY to Cali he tucked it up in the rafters of his garage where it sat for 41 years, thankfuly they had no humidity.
Thanks

The Nihinto Board is a very friendly and helpful board. They were nice enough to help me with two different blades.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:47:18 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By swingset:
Tang says Shintaro Ginsu made that, and he tested it on a tin can before slicing a ripe tomato.
View Quote


That's swingset!
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:49:54 AM EDT
OP, Can you take a few shots of the blade and handle for us.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:54:14 AM EDT
Thats a real Hanwei Practicle XL, well maybe not, wheres the hologram?
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:56:35 AM EDT
No tape??
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 10:58:38 AM EDT
Cold Steel
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:04:40 AM EDT
Some brillo and flitz on that handle will make it really purty and shiny like!















Just kidding by the way, don't touch the rust and shit on there.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:08:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 11:08:32 AM EDT by Michigan_Man]
Yup, that is definitely a ninja sword.

Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:37:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 11:38:06 AM EDT by DK-Prof]
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:50:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 11:52:41 AM EDT by dewoitine]
I'm far from being an expert but my feelings with this one is rather good.
The Mei on WW2 machine-made blades are generally cruder than this, here the chisel strokes are well-made.
And I can't see the name of the city of Seki where many of the lowest quality blades were made.

And you must already know this but it's an officer sword not an NCO one.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:51:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:52:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 11:57:16 AM EDT by usp45c]
I tried looking it up by radical, but I did not see anything resembling what is on yours. Try swordforum.
ETA: what DK said
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:53:05 AM EDT
That's Musashi's lost sword!




Kidding, I have no idea. Cool though.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 11:56:50 AM EDT
Not an expert in any stretch, but my guess considering where/when he got it, is that it's a jap officers sword. Outside of that I have no idea
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 12:01:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Diesel_Maximus_2992:
Not an expert in any stretch, but my guess considering where/when he got it, is that it's a jap officers sword. Outside of that I have no idea
View Quote


It's most definitely an officers sword. Question is was it made in that era if so what level of quality. It could also be a very old family sword that was mounted in military mounts.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 12:12:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 12:18:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 12:18:56 PM EDT by Rincon_11]
Love these threads!
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 12:28:06 PM EDT
Bottom kanji looks like "yuki/ko", I don't recognize the kanji on top... Middle character looks like the Hiragana "oh"... .02
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 6:48:13 AM EDT
Tagged for sword update
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 6:55:07 AM EDT
that's really cool. Whether it's worth 50 bucks or 50 thousand, it's so cool your grandfather had that and it was connected to his service. Neat story and neat blade. I'm fascinated by those swords and wish I had the money or the knowledge to collect them. It'd be wasted on me though so I just read about them.....

Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:03:24 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rincon_11:
Love these threads!
View Quote
Hell Yeah! Tag for updates
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:08:03 AM EDT
Very cool.
I'm very envious.
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:11:53 AM EDT
Nice find , You should wrap the handle in duct tape and cut up carpet rolls on youtube with it . Just kidding trust DK he knows about sharp Japanese stuff
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:16:38 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jaymac426:
Bottom kanji looks like "yuki/ko", I don't recognize the kanji on top... Middle character looks like the Hiragana "oh"... .02
View Quote


I'm going to go with the top character being a sloppy hiragana "ha", making the whole thing Haoyuki, which is a Japanese first name.
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:22:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2014 7:34:15 AM EDT by TrojanMan]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By whiskerz:
Nice find , You should wrap the handle in duct tape and cut up carpet rolls on youtube with it . Just kidding trust DK he knows about sharp Japanese stuff
View Quote


I like the dude on Antiques Roadshow who had his dad's sword from the Pacific, and every year on the 4th of July he'd bring it out and slice open a watermellon with it.

The appraiser was like, "Well, you need to stop doing that, because this is much older than WW2 by about 200 years, and it's worth $25,000."

(Or whatever the value/age was, it was lots/old.)


ETA: Nevermind, my memory is a fucking liar.

It was a CSA sword, and the whole thing was staged for publicity.

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2001-07-08/news/0107080276_1_juno-sword-antiques-roadshow
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 7:58:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 8:01:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 11:33:49 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By VA-gunnut:
OST as I love these threads.
View Quote

Link Posted: 8/12/2014 11:41:38 AM EDT
What's it cost to have it polished?


If it's a family heirloom and not a machine made blade, I'd restore it completely.
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 11:51:09 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
What's it cost to have it polished?


If it's a family heirloom and not a machine made blade, I'd restore it completely.
View Quote


Several grand to have it done right.
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 11:53:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 11:59:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 12:11:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2014 12:18:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:



That is correct.

There are one or two polishers in the U.S. who can do a REALLY good job ... which obviously saved the hassle, cost and risk of sending a blade to Japan.

For a full-length katana, the polishing cost would be somewhere between $2000 and $3000.

Famous polishers in Japan will have waiting lists longer than that, and be more expensive.

Of the few people in the U.S. who can do a great job, someone like David Hofhine has a waiting list that is close to two years. I'm currently on his list for a wakizashi. My blade doesn't actually NEED a new polish, but I want it repolished in a different polishing style (sashikomi) which we both agree will suit the blade better.

Another ARFCOMMER had him restore and repolish a WW-2 bringback, which was a very nice 17th century blade. And the transformation is amazing!



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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Originally Posted By StewartTR:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
What's it cost to have it polished?


If it's a family heirloom and not a machine made blade, I'd restore it completely.


Several grand to have it done right.



That is correct.

There are one or two polishers in the U.S. who can do a REALLY good job ... which obviously saved the hassle, cost and risk of sending a blade to Japan.

For a full-length katana, the polishing cost would be somewhere between $2000 and $3000.

Famous polishers in Japan will have waiting lists longer than that, and be more expensive.

Of the few people in the U.S. who can do a great job, someone like David Hofhine has a waiting list that is close to two years. I'm currently on his list for a wakizashi. My blade doesn't actually NEED a new polish, but I want it repolished in a different polishing style (sashikomi) which we both agree will suit the blade better.

Another ARFCOMMER had him restore and repolish a WW-2 bringback, which was a very nice 17th century blade. And the transformation is amazing!




pics of before and afters? or link to thread
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