Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 8
Posted: 6/14/2007 6:15:18 PM EDT
I'LL GO FIRST............

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:19:12 PM EDT
To hell with it if I get flamed.


This picture gets posted too often, it losing its impact.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:19:43 PM EDT

Omaha, Beach D-Day
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:20:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:21:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
www.army.mil/cmh-pg/reference/normandy/Images/CG-2343.jpg
Omaha, Beach D-Day


Now THAT is f'n brave!!
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:22:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:23:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?

Would you like to be the Marine that hands the flag to dead Marine's son?

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:24:30 PM EDT


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:24:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:27:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:28:38 PM EDT by distributor_of_pain]

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?

Would you like to be the Marine that hands the flag to dead Marine's son?



Of course not, but I could easily do it.
Jumping off that boat on D-day takes a whole lotta something I probably don't have. I'm almost certain I would have puked, and then jumped over the side after a quick prayer!

ETA: It is a very moving pic though!
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:28:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:39:37 PM EDT by Black-Tiger]








Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:29:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:33:01 PM EDT


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:33:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?

Would you like to be the Marine that hands the flag to dead Marine's son?



Of course not, but I could easily do it.
Jumping off that boat on D-day takes a whole lotta something I probably don't have. I'm almost certain I would have puked, and then jumped over the side after a quick prayer!

ETA: It is a very moving pic though!



If you think you could easily do it, you have no idea what it means.

That young man stood there and took that flag like a grown man. He lost his father in combat and stood tall to receive the flag.

His dad is in a coffin a few feet away.

That is one of the most clear examples of bravery you will ever see.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:34:20 PM EDT


I love this one, though!


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:35:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FedDC:

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?

Would you like to be the Marine that hands the flag to dead Marine's son?



I thought that the young man's bravery was pretty obvious myself!!

Of course not, but I could easily do it.
Jumping off that boat on D-day takes a whole lotta something I probably don't have. I'm almost certain I would have puked, and then jumped over the side after a quick prayer!

ETA: It is a very moving pic though!



If you think you could easily do it, you have no idea what it means.

That young man stood there and took that flag like a grown man. He lost his father in combat and stood tall to receive the flag.

His dad is in a coffin a few feet away.

That is one of the most clear examples of bravery you will ever see.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:37:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:37:31 PM EDT by aaron_fsp]
Compared to the recent elected characters filling these shoes....

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:39:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FedDC:


If you think you could easily do it, you have no idea what it means.

That young man stood there and took that flag like a grown man. He lost his father in combat and stood tall to receive the flag.

His dad is in a coffin a few feet away.

That is one of the most clear examples of bravery you will ever see.


I have to disagree. Although it is sad and heartwrenching, the bearing and recieving of a burial flag is no more brave than any of the other formal proceedings at a military funeral. Does it show strength of character and emotion? yes, but so does many other acts that are not considered "brave".

Maybe it's a matter of context and this wasnt the OP's idea of such.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:40:03 PM EDT


- Clint
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:40:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:42:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:44:03 PM EDT
Two pictures that define bravery to me:



Yes, that's the Hawaiian Good Luck sign he's giving the Iraqi insurgent who detonated an IED he was standing over (he's EOD). This was his third tour in Iraq. Full story here.



Joe Kittinger. My personal hero, former AF colonel, F-4 pilot, Hanoi Hilton resident and Wiley E. Coyote stuntman.

In the 1960s he spent 45 minutes riding a phone-booth sized gondola up to 102,000 feet....then stepped out into empty space. He freefalled (free-fell?) for 4 minutes and 36 seconds (world record) and reached a top speed of over 700 miles an hour. He has the distinction of being the only man to break the sound barrier without the benefit of an aircraft.

He's brave because he had 45 minutes to sit there and think about it, and he did it anyway. The right glove of his pressure suit failed right after takeoff and as his hand started to swell he decided to press with the mission, because "If I said anything about it, they'd just make me do it all over again." (his words).

Yep, big brass ones.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:44:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:49:12 PM EDT by -Duke-Nukem-]


Die for your country? Yes please. Drink from the same water fountain as white people when you get back? No way.





Take this 5-shot bolt action, ski south and use your ski poles as a rest to shoot at the Red Army. You'll know its the Red Army by the tens of thousands of infantry there. Good luck, Finland is counting on you.





See all those guys alternately hiding behind tombstones and quickly popping up to spray automatic fire at your men? Try to kill them without hitting any holy shrines, we don't want to upset the locals. By the way, polls show most of the people back home watching Seinfeld re-runs in their air conditioned homes think you're a stooge of GW Bush for even following orders to be sent here.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:46:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:46:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:47:57 PM EDT

Colonel Hal Moore directing the battle of the 1/7 CAV at LZ X-Ray, Vietnam, 1965


Major Mark Bieger, XO of the 1-24 INF BN, craddling mortally wounded child injured in terrorist bombing in Mosul, Iraq


LTC Erik Kurilla of the 1-24 INF, at the moment AK bullets impact his leg as he leads his men from the front while in hot pursuit of terrorists in Mosul, Iraq.


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:48:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:49:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
www.delanoye.org/DPix/Shepard_moon.jpg




1.) You win

2.) Glad to see you're back

3.) Though my pick isnt on the moon.....it is pretty close


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:50:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:52:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


I'd say that little boy looks pretty brave to me.

I was 40 when white gloves like that handed me My father's flag.

I'll never forget when he looked me straight in the eye and said.

"On behalf of the President of the United States, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, and a grateful nation, please accept this flag as a symbol of our appreciation for your loved one's service to Country and Corps."


As a grown man, disabled veteran, husband and father, I could handle it.
I can't imagine what that boy's going through.
I was lucky.
That young man will have to grow up without a father.

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:53:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:55:35 PM EDT by BuckeyeRifleman]
Ascending the stairs of tower 1, 9/11/01


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:53:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:55:06 PM EDT


Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:55:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 6:57:02 PM EDT by AcidGambit]


I got a lot of respect for the rescuse swimmers (both CG and USAF PJs) they daily go out and save total strangers, sometimes in some pretty nasty weather.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:56:02 PM EDT












Stacy Dragila, first womens Olympic pole vault champion. I'm friends with Stacy from my travels at national and international track meets, but more closely I am associated with her because we have the same coach and the same hometown. Stacy is a VERY sweet woman, and she has displayed utter courage and guts fighting thru injury after injury, along with disdain and contempt from male pole vaulters who didn't think she should be vaulting, much less beating them.

-Ben
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:56:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
www.americaslibrary.gov/assets/es/ca/es_ca_logging_1_e.jpg


This one I'm not sure I'd call bravery.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 6:59:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:

Originally Posted By nevadasun:
I'LL GO FIRST............

i146.photobucket.com/albums/r272/nevadasun/MarineChild.jpg


How is that brave?


I’ve stood in that kid’s spot. Only I was in my mid 30s and my father had died of natural causes at 78. I probably had a look on my face like that kid did, I know I felt that small.

I don’t consider myself to be overly brave. But I have been in situations where I easily could have died and I’ve never panicked, I’ve just done what had to be done.

But nothing prepared me for standing there getting that flag at my father’s funeral. Maybe it’s not courage exactly. But that little kid is showing something just to be able to stand there. I would rather face an entire SS panzer division armed only with a pocket knife than to go through that again.

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:03:05 PM EDT






Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:04:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:09:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:12:38 PM EDT


This is SSgt Madison Alexander Strohlein. On 22 June, 1971 he led a SOG HALO team on a mission 5 miles from the S. Vietnam/Laos border. He landed in a tree and was unable to get down. The team came under heavy enemy fire and was forced to E&E. When a rescue team was inserted, they found the tree that he had landed in, along with signs of a heavy firefight. He is thought to have been captured alive, but his remains have never been recovered and his whereabouts are unknown. He was 23 years old.



This one is SFC Jerry Shriver. He ran recon with SOG for three straight years. On 24 April, 1969, his team came under heavy fire on an LZ and were pinned down in the open by a machinegun in a bunker just inside the treeline. He led several Yards into the treeline to engage the machinegun and was never seen again.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:13:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BuckeyeRifleman:
Ascending the stairs of tower 1, 9/11/01
i26.photobucket.com/albums/c125/BuckeyeRifleman/stairs.jpg?t=1181876128


my cousin was one of those firefighters
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:13:46 PM EDT
If I could find them I would post the pictures of the Korean Americans defending their stores during the 1992 LA riots. They had the balls and guns to stand up to roving bands of rioters while the government hid and proved the need for the second amendment to the constitution.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:17:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:17:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 12:06:24 PM EDT by MudFlapper]




My Grandfather:

BRANCH OF SERVICE
12th Army Air Force
57th Bomb Wing
310th Bombardment Group
428th Squadron

ACTIVITY DURING WWII
SERVED AS PILOT, ON B-25 AIRCRAFT. FLEW 62 MISSIONS. AWARDED DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS, AIR MEDAL WITH 7 OAK LEAF CLUSTERS AND EARNED TWO BATTLE STARS.

Pictures are not of his plane. He only has one picture, and it has him and his crew standing in front of his bird.

Thank you sir
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:20:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 7:21:04 PM EDT by firefighter1213]
Don't know if you all consider this bravery, don't rightly care, but this guy grew up in my hometown, had both legs (ETA:below the knees) removed by an IED just a few months ago...

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:20:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:24:04 PM EDT
SHOW ME PICTURES OF BRAVERY.............

My boy



GM
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:26:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 7:27:54 PM EDT by minime]
Here's my humble offering with much thanks to the brave men who selflessly serve their country!

Descending Tunnel Rat:

Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:27:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:34:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2007 7:36:25 PM EDT by fadedsun]
Whoa that's a big pic


Brian Chontosh

Captain Brian R. Chontosh (born 1974 in Rochester, New York) is a United States Marine Corps officer who was awarded the Navy Cross for his service during the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. At the time he was the platoon commander for weapons platoon, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division.

On March 25, 2003, during an ambush while advancing upon Baghdad, Chontosh aggressively attacked an entrenched enemy position, resorting to using captured enemy weaponry when his M16 ran out of ammunition. He is reported to have killed at least 20 enemy soldiers during the incident.

Chontosh returned to Iraq during the second half of 2004 as the commanding officer of India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. During this time his company took part in Operation Phantom Fury, the second assault on Fallujah in November of 2004. Of the 158 Marines he commanded, only 3 were killed in action and 25 were wounded. During this time his company was also the focus of a Fox News documentary titled Breaking Point:Company of Heroes.

He is currently an instructor at the Infantry Officer Course at Marine Corps Base Quantico. He is married with one son.

There have been several news articles on the perceived lack of coverage that was awarded to this and other medal ceremonies. The controversy over the coverage or lack of coverage of Chontosh and several other soldiers is seen as the latest cultural clash between pro-war and anti-war political camps.[1]

Oohrah
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 8
Top Top