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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/10/2006 8:58:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 8:59:43 AM EDT by Avalon01]
I am looking for a sandblaster to help me with my M38A1 restoration. It will be used to clean paint off the tub and other parts I pull from the Jeep.

I have about $125 to spend, and already have an air compressor.

There are also some gravity fed sandblasters, but I would think a pressurized system would be better.

I found a 40 pound pressurized sandblaster by Central Pneumatic in my price range. It seems OK, but I've never owned or used a sandblaster before.

Any suggestions?

Av.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:01:12 AM EDT
harborfreight.com
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:08:17 AM EDT
Avalon, the only suggestion I have is to try Sears.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:10:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 9:11:07 AM EDT by TodaysTomSawyer]
Sandblasters come in handy for smaller stuff, but you may be disappointed trying to use it over a large surface. The area that is blasted is relatively small for the home units and these things go through sand like crap through a goose.

I've got an old gravity feed that I use for corners or tight spots, otherwise a DA sander with 180 grit, or Aircraft Stripper get the nod.

Be sure to get a face shield, tyvek paint suit, gloves, and something to cover your head, because the sand goes everyhere. I mean every friggin' where.

ETA - mine was from Sears
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:20:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
harborfreight.com



But what is a good one?

Av.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:21:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By deej86:
Avalon, the only suggestion I have is to try Sears.



Again, what would make sandblaster "A" better than "B"?

Av.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:23:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TodaysTomSawyer:
Sandblasters come in handy for smaller stuff, but you may be disappointed trying to use it over a large surface. The area that is blasted is relatively small for the home units and these things go through sand like crap through a goose.

I've got an old gravity feed that I use for corners or tight spots, otherwise a DA sander with 180 grit, or Aircraft Stripper get the nod.

Be sure to get a face shield, tyvek paint suit, gloves, and something to cover your head, because the sand goes everyhere. I mean every friggin' where.

ETA - mine was from Sears



As long as I can get some of the smaller areas of the Jeep (round fenders, nooks and crannies), I'll be happy with it.

Have you tried any of the handheld gravity feed units?

Is it possible to use sandbox sand or do I have to buy sandblasting media?
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:29:10 AM EDT
I can't speak of the sandblaster units themselves, but I will tell you that Central Pneumatic makes a good product. Get it for Harbor Freight, and get the 2-year unlimited warranty. Then bring it back every year for a brand new one. You won't et the best out there, but your money will be well spent for the uses you need it for.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:37:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 9:38:04 AM EDT by hanau]
i have one from harbor freight.it is alright for small stuff and i have used it on cars.but it does go thru the media.
make sure you have a big air compressor with a high cfm.

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=34202

i have used some sand and also glass beads.the both do seem to get clogged up.
but it should be alright for what it sounds like you are wanting to do.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:38:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 9:43:37 AM EDT by TodaysTomSawyer]

Originally Posted By Avalon01:


As long as I can get some of the smaller areas of the Jeep (round fenders, nooks and crannies), I'll be happy with it. It will work well for that type of thing.

Have you tried any of the handheld gravity feed units? No, the one I have sits on the ground and has a 10? foot hose to the nozzle. It will hold 50lbs of sand and that goes by quickly. To me, a handheld may be too hard to get into tight spots, where working with nozzle only, you can get pretty much anywhere.

Is it possible to use sandbox sand or do I have to buy sandblasting media? I use regular playsand.

Also, unless you have a large compressor, be ready for the thing to run constantly. Also, I've found that it helps to put a throw away water filter (plastic - used for sprayguns, screws to the fitting) on your blaster or the constant running creates so much condensation that the sand tries to clump in the nozzle - dry sand > good, wet sand > bad.

Good luck with your project and be sure to post some pics



ETA - this is what I have -www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00916706000&subcat=Automotive+Air+Tools

Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:39:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 9:42:42 AM EDT by wildearp]
Pay someone to do it in a booth. Silica sand is not good for your lungs, and is what you should use for blasting. You need a huge amount of air to run a sand blaster, I am talking 20+CFM for a big job that you don't want to make a career out of.

If you pay someone, get a firm quote first, do not go by their "hour meter", trust me on this.

Stripping a vehicle is not "light home use". There are faster ways to strip a vehicle. You can use a rosebud (oxyacetylene) and a scraper, a wire wheel on a 4" and 9" Makita angle grinder, or chemical strippers.

I have done this before, and trust me, sand blasting is one messy thing to do.
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 9:47:01 AM EDT
I have this one. It works ok for light duty.

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=30979

Link Posted: 3/10/2006 11:18:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 11:22:35 AM EDT by Avalon01]

Originally Posted By wildearp:
Pay someone to do it in a booth. Silica sand is not good for your lungs, and is what you should use for blasting. You need a huge amount of air to run a sand blaster, I am talking 20+CFM for a big job that you don't want to make a career out of.

If you pay someone, get a firm quote first, do not go by their "hour meter", trust me on this.

Stripping a vehicle is not "light home use". There are faster ways to strip a vehicle. You can use a rosebud (oxyacetylene) and a scraper, a wire wheel on a 4" and 9" Makita angle grinder, or chemical strippers.

I have done this before, and trust me, sand blasting is one messy thing to do.



I have done most of the Jeep - well over 90% - with an angle grinder and wire brushes. That works fine, but there are quite a few places I can not get to due to the angles involved. Plus, the USMC coated the underside of the tub and fenders with some sort of tar-like substance. It plays hell with the wire wheels.

A sandblaster seems like a good way to clean all the nuts and bolts, and get the hard to reach areas clean.

I did look into having the parts done at a shop, but the cost of a single part was twice as much as buying a basic sandblaster. Considering most of the paint is already wire wheeled off, it seemed like a waste of money to me.

Also, is there anyway to reuse the media, or do I just keep pouring sand into it?

Av.
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