Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 7/24/2013 2:13:54 PM EST
What forms should I have a machine shop sign before they produce a part for me that I want to patent?

The problem is I also need them to make a CAD model as well as CAM and Gcode for me, because paying them is going to be cheaper than thousands of dollar CAD programs.

I assume some sort of confidentiality agreements?

Should I just pony up the money and have the patent lawyer prepare the forms?

Thanks.


Link Posted: 7/24/2013 2:20:14 PM EST
NDAs are a good start for your first prototype! Patent will be the more protectable method, but you should keep a good NDA on hand anyways. (Make sure you have a lawyer draw it up, and not use the boilerplate ones online.)
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 3:56:59 PM EST
Most machine shop owners have no interest in stealing your idea.

Quite the contrary, they want to just be the shop that does all the machining on your project,
so it's in their best interests to treat you right, and of course that includes being very protective
and guarded about the work they are doing for you.

The purpose of machine shops is to make parts. Not to steal ideas.

If they were to try to steal your idea, it stands to reason that they'd have to do more than just make
the parts, they'd have to manufacture the entire related product and handle marketing, sales, and distribution, too,
and a contract machine shop DOES NOT DO THOSE THINGS.

They're in business to make parts FOR the people who manufacture, market, and sell products, and not to
try to steal their business.

Now, if you were to approach a highly integrated manufacturer with a product that would fit into their product line,
hoping to sell the idea to them, THEN you would want to be very guarded about your design and your rights to it.


CJ
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:34:13 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Most machine shop owners have no interest in stealing your idea.

Quite the contrary, they want to just be the shop that does all the machining on your project,
so it's in their best interests to treat you right, and of course that includes being very protective
and guarded about the work they are doing for you.

The purpose of machine shops is to make parts. Not to steal ideas.

If they were to try to steal your idea, it stands to reason that they'd have to do more than just make
the parts, they'd have to manufacture the entire related product and handle marketing, sales, and distribution, too,
and a contract machine shop DOES NOT DO THOSE THINGS.

They're in business to make parts FOR the people who manufacture, market, and sell products, and not to
try to steal their business.

Solid take.

Now, if you were to approach a highly integrated manufacturer with a product that would fit into their product line,
hoping to sell the idea to them, THEN you would want to be very guarded about your design and your rights to it.


CJ
View Quote

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:36:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Throwsabender:

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Throwsabender:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Most machine shop owners have no interest in stealing your idea.

Quite the contrary, they want to just be the shop that does all the machining on your project,
so it's in their best interests to treat you right, and of course that includes being very protective
and guarded about the work they are doing for you.

The purpose of machine shops is to make parts. Not to steal ideas.

If they were to try to steal your idea, it stands to reason that they'd have to do more than just make
the parts, they'd have to manufacture the entire related product and handle marketing, sales, and distribution, too,
and a contract machine shop DOES NOT DO THOSE THINGS.

They're in business to make parts FOR the people who manufacture, market, and sell products, and not to
try to steal their business.

Solid take.

Now, if you were to approach a highly integrated manufacturer with a product that would fit into their product line,
hoping to sell the idea to them, THEN you would want to be very guarded about your design and your rights to it.


CJ



Sorry dude above me. I hit wrong button.
Solid take was supposed to be in mine. RETARD.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:44:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2013 4:45:02 PM EST by shrikefan]
How far along are you in the patent process and how much research have you done on your own research through the USPTO?
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 8:51:58 PM EST
If you are making prototypes of an invention, there are a lot of issues with disclosure beyond the machine shop.

You need to discuss your project with a patent attorney before making the prototype. If you can't afford a patent attorney at this stage, for a consultation on avoiding disclosure that starts the statutory time for filing, then you are not going to be able to afford the actual application anyway.
Top Top