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Posted: 1/7/2005 5:31:09 PM EDT
My family and I have lived in this 10.5 years now, we had it built for us, no problems until about a week ago.

The shower in our main bathroom started "hammering" when we turn the faucet on high.  This is not be be confused with a "water hammer" effect' this is a high frequencybang-bang-bang-bang that appears to originate at the water faucet.  I have copper pipes and the pipe behind the shower head and faucet are tight, I made sure of that when I had the home built 10.5 years ago and I checked them again.

I turned off the water to the house, drained the pipes of water and disassembled the shower head and the faucet handle.  No obstructions or anything else out of the ordinary were found.  The only way to mitigate the noise and the hammering is to turn the faucet down to reduce the water volume.  However, I want to find and correct the cause.

Anyone know what is causing this and how I can fix it?

Thanks,

Merlin
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:33:54 PM EDT
YOu need to replace the hot/cold water faucet on the shower.  The internal discs are vibrating form wear.  Ops
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:43:08 PM EDT
Yup
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:44:37 PM EDT
I can attest to the fact that there are plumbing geniuses on this board tonight !

They know what they are talking about

Link Posted: 1/7/2005 7:04:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 7:24:29 PM EDT by bobbyjack]
Probably the screw that holds your faucet washer on is loose on the stem!!!

Well after reading again I see your house is probably too new too have the old style stem!!

So check out DK-PROF post on changing out Washerless faucet stems!!

But if it turns out you have the old stems you will need special stem sockets to take out the stems to repace the washers!

Bob
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 7:06:04 PM EDT
Its the valve.......prolly a cheaper one (no offense).
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 7:06:11 PM EDT
just cut the blue wire.  Alway cut the blue wi.......wait, wrong thread.  

Sorry
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:07:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By quijanos:
Its the valve.......prolly a cheaper one (no offense).



I'll find out this afternoon.

What I plan to do is to shut the water to the house off, disassemble the valve and take the whole thing to Lowe's.  I'll buy a new replacement vavle and go from there.

10.5 years is not bad service for a shower that used 2-4 times per day.

Thanks,

Merlin
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:49:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Merlin:


10.5 years is not bad service for a shower that used 2-4 times per day.

Thanks,

Merlin



What Brand faucet is it? I have h ad my Delta for 37 years. Finish is starting to lose it's luster, but all I have ever done is change the rubbers inside, and it is usually only the hot water side.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 11:03:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By so2315:

Originally Posted By Merlin:


10.5 years is not bad service for a shower that used 2-4 times per day.

Thanks,

Merlin



What Brand faucet is it? I have h ad my Delta for 37 years. Finish is starting to lose it's luster, but all I have ever done is change the rubbers inside, and it is usually only the hot water side.




so2315, it's a Delta.

Well that sucked:  I just spend an hour or so replacing the washer thingies and the springs and while it changed the hammer effect frequency, it didn't eliminate it.  I bought a complete Delta replacement parts kit for about $10 at Lowe's.  However, it was for a sink faucet, but the rubber o-ring parts are the same as in my shower faucet.  Guess I gotta back to Lowe's and see if they have any plumbing experts.

Any other ideas?

Thanks,

Merlin
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 11:17:31 AM EDT
That would happen to me when the water filter needed to be changed.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 5:45:37 PM EDT
OK update:

My wife called 2 plumbers today and they came out.  Here's what she said they said:

- Water pressure too high, need to replace the (either the man valve or pressure regulator, my wife wasn't clear).  Both said it's common to our area.  Both took pressure readings and said it was 90-100 psi, "way too high".  One gave a quote of $465 the other aboutg $250 to replace the valve/pressure regulator.


Well, here's what I know:  I just took a pressure reading with my guage and it's reading just under 80 psi, the same as it did when I bought the house 10 years ago and checked again after replacing a water heater about 4 years ago.  

The high frequency water hammer effect only affects this one shower stall, none of the other showers or faucets, most of which are designed just like this one.

I installed a water expansion tank, about 1.5 cu ft. 4 years ago; I filled it with 80 psi air then. it now reads 70 psi; I guess I'll uninstall it, take it down to the garage, fill it back up and reinstall it and see if that makes any difference.

Any other ideas or comments?  Anybody believe the plumbers?

Thanks,

Merlin
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:34:31 PM EDT
Plumber checking in:

Pressure is TOO HIGH, I heartily concur. This could be due to peak/off peak pressure fluctuations. You need to install a pressure regulator after the meter as you only need about 55psi or less to run a house. Dump that pressure down sir, your plumbing will last longer.


Dram out
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:43:20 PM EDT
Regulators are not very expensive and are dirt simple to install (hint: do not install backward).

Go buy one and set your pressure to the desired range.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:49:44 PM EDT
You think you have problems, I came home tonight to find I had no water pressure. Went and checked the meter 100 yards up the road and the needle is making about one complete revelutionevery 15 seconds! Everything is covered in snow and the meter keeps spinning when I shut off the water right at the house. No water coming through the snow anywhere that can be seen. Guess it's a day off work without pay for me tomorrow
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 7:11:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dramborleg:
Plumber checking in:

Pressure is TOO HIGH, I heartily concur. This could be due to peak/off peak pressure fluctuations. You need to install a pressure regulator after the meter as you only need about 55psi or less to run a house. Dump that pressure down sir, your plumbing will last longer.


Dram out



Ok, When I get back from Tellico this weekend, I'll see if there is even a pressure regulator installed.  There is for almost every other house in my neighborhood.  I've helped several of my neighbors regulate their pressure, we had to dig out each and every regulator before we could do it.  Interestingly enough, most had to have their's increased, not decreased.

I'll get the pressure down to around 60-65 since I have a 2 story; once I find it, assuming it exists, it will be easy to adjust.

So, you're sure it's not the valve?

Thanks,

Merlin
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