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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/16/2009 11:12:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 11:25:40 PM EST by flyfishnepa]


this one has always been one of my favorites. i think i first saw it in national geographic.

if i remember correctly (correct me if im wrong) it's a couple billion light years from the top of one of those gas clouds to the bottom of the picture.

awe inspiring IMO






this one is pretty neat also


Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:16:36 PM EST

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:21:50 PM EST


xvt screen cap?

xwa was better
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:26:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:26:26 PM EST
Ah yes, one of hubble's most famous shots. Most, if not all of our best deep space pictures have some from the hubble space telescope. It will be a sad day when they give it its final marching orders into the pacific ocean. :(
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:27:41 PM EST



this is a serious thread and your not being serious





Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:30:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 11:32:14 PM EST by freeride21a]


I remember playing the x-wing and tie fighter on my buddies brand new Pentium 60 back in 94... SO AWESOME. I loved those games!

Do photos looking into space from earth count?
I took this one in 04, caught a nice meteor during the perseids.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:33:00 PM EST
Originally Posted By flyfishnepa:


this one has always been one of my favorites. i think i first saw it in national geographic.

if i remember correctly (correct me if im wrong) it's a couple billion light years from the top of one of those gas clouds to the bottom of the picture.
awe inspiring IMO



http://i30.tinypic.com/b67twp.jpg


this one is pretty neat also

http://i27.tinypic.com/5l3q4i.jpg


Damn. Thats a long way. Just looking at that and trying to comprehend the distance is crazy.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:37:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By flyfishnepa:



this is a serious thread and your not being serious







Ok, ok....Andromeda (M31) FTW.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:07:55 AM EST


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:11:35 AM EST
Some of these pics are amazing, It makes me wonder if some day we will travel them like in the movies.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:19:49 AM EST
Great pics....
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:20:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 12:24:26 AM EST by Mercury]
Hubble Ultra Deep Field:






The Hubble Ultra Deep Field, or HUDF, is an image of a small region of space in the constellation Fornax, composited from Hubble Space Telescope data accumulated over a period from September 24, 2003 through January 16, 2004. It is the deepest image of the universe ever taken[1], looking back approximately 13 billion years, and it will be used to search for galaxies that existed between 400 and 800 million years after the Big Bang. The HUDF image was taken in a section of the sky with a low density of bright stars in the near-field, allowing much better viewing of dimmer, more distant objects. The image contains an estimated 10,000 galaxies.

Located southwest of Orion in the Southern-Hemisphere constellation Fornax, the image covers 11.0 square arcminutes. This is just one-tenth the diameter of the full moon as viewed from Earth, smaller than a 1 mm by 1 mm square of paper held 1 meter away, and equal to roughly one thirteen-millionth of the total area of the sky. The image is oriented such that the upper left corner points toward north (-46.4°) on the celestial sphere.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_ultra_deep_field


And by the way, Tie Fighter was better.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:25:33 AM EST




Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:44:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By Mercury:
Hubble Ultra Deep Field:
>snip<



All that and we still don't have detailed pics of the lunar landers on the moon a measley quarter million miles away....what a crock....




not serious by the way...
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:47:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By Moose:
Originally Posted By Mercury:
Hubble Ultra Deep Field:
>snip<



All that and we still don't have detailed pics of the lunar landers on the moon a measley quarter million miles away....what a crock....




not serious by the way...

We do, actually... they snapped some recently just to shut the troofers up. Stupid idea, as the troofers responded exactly as predicted: "Photoshop!"
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 12:50:15 AM EST
Must be a lotta aliens out there.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:15:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By Frost7:
We do, actually... they snapped some recently just to shut the troofers up. Stupid idea, as the troofers responded exactly as predicted: "Photoshop!"


Yeah, I know about those.
I really can't wait for some hires versions to come out.

Another of my favs:


After the photographer saw the pic, he was quite humbled at the thought that it contained the entirety of humanity....except for him.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:17:03 AM EST

Originally Posted By PeculiarSatyr:
Must be a lotta aliens out there.



Can we please build a wall to keep them out?
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:26:46 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:40:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By kpel308:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/81/Kittinger-jump.jpg/472px-Kittinger-jump.jpg
First man in space, Col. Joe Kittinger
102, 800ft., 16AUG60.

The man CLANKS when he walks! He still kicks much ass at 81 years of age.

God bless ya, Colonel!

<=====And yes, his PLF from 102,800ft was better than mine from 2,100ft.



love the duct tape on his chute.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:42:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 1:44:14 AM EST by Moose]
Originally Posted By kpel308:
<=====And yes, his PLF from 102,800ft was better than mine from 2,100ft.


Well, he did have a bit longer to prep for it...

IIRC, he broke the sound barrier while in freefall, didn't he?

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:50:16 AM EST
Nasa's APOD is a great site:















Those are all from the past couple of weeks
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:25:34 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:43:56 AM EST
God, I love this stuff. Tag.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:56:10 AM EST
It's really amazing to think that some of these views you can find in yalls own back yards. Having been a relative city dwelling, I rarely see more than 10-15 stars on a clear cool night. Great pics. Keep em coming.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:06:21 AM EST
I've always found this one intriguing.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:08:50 AM EST
Tag for more cool pics.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:12:46 AM EST
Wonder if just before they send it into the ocean it could take a pic of all that stuff we left on the moon from being there. Surely it's capable.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:17:40 AM EST
Those pics always make me think of this hymn:


O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the works Thy hand hath made
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder
Thy power throughout the universe displayed



Our feeble human minds cannot even begin to comprehend the wonders of the Universe.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:19:45 AM EST
Take your pick: Astronomy Pic of the Day archives

7,000 Stars and the Milky Way


Eta Carinae Before Explosion


The Face on Mars
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:21:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:26:29 AM EST
tag
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:06:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By Mercury:
Hubble Ultra Deep Field:


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v299/MercuryRsingHg/hubble_ultra_deep_field.jpg



The Hubble Ultra Deep Field, or HUDF, is an image of a small region of space in the constellation Fornax, composited from Hubble Space Telescope data accumulated over a period from September 24, 2003 through January 16, 2004. It is the deepest image of the universe ever taken[1], looking back approximately 13 billion years, and it will be used to search for galaxies that existed between 400 and 800 million years after the Big Bang. The HUDF image was taken in a section of the sky with a low density of bright stars in the near-field, allowing much better viewing of dimmer, more distant objects. The image contains an estimated 10,000 galaxies.

Located southwest of Orion in the Southern-Hemisphere constellation Fornax, the image covers 11.0 square arcminutes. This is just one-tenth the diameter of the full moon as viewed from Earth, smaller than a 1 mm by 1 mm square of paper held 1 meter away, and equal to roughly one thirteen-millionth of the total area of the sky. The image is oriented such that the upper left corner points toward north (-46.4°) on the celestial sphere.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_ultra_deep_field


And by the way, Tie Fighter was better.


this picture gave me chills... absolutely incredible...

Thanks for sharing...
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