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Posted: 10/7/2004 3:00:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/9/2004 4:49:04 AM EST by kindstranger]
Ford vs. Chevy... Who is the bigger legend?
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:01:50 PM EST
Suzuki vs. Citroen?

err...wait...
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:36:53 PM EST
Audie Murphy.

The cold fact is, mention Pappy Boyington to the average person, and they have NO idea who you're talking about.

Mention Audie Murphy, and they remember he was an actor who was a hero in SOME war.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:38:29 PM EST
No contest, Audie.

Rejected by the Marines, rejected by the paratroopers, brave souls will always have a home in Army leg infantry.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:42:24 PM EST
I think Audie would be more likely to be at least heard of by the "man on the street" than Greg would.

I think in this PC world we live in, Pappy's life would be looked on with horror by most of our pussyfied society.

Both are great men that put their asses on the line when it counted.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:49:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2004 3:49:26 PM EST by LonesomeHawk]
Audie Murphy is The Man!I also think highly of sgt. York.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:52:31 PM EST
"Chesty" Puller
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:55:23 PM EST
Has anyone read the book Baa Baa Black Sheep? It is really a good book describing Boyington's experience in a Japanese POW camp, and not about the silly show way back when. I had a chance to meet him at an air show a number of years ago. He was autographing his book. About 20 feet away was another flyer signing his book. It was the Japanese pilot that shot Pappy down.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 3:58:15 PM EST
Pappy...He flew a Corsair for God's sake!

Link Posted: 10/7/2004 4:04:50 PM EST
Audie all the way. He was a courageous man with no interest in the limelight.

In the end, they both led sad lives. Audie suffered from PTSD and addiction. Pappy was an alcoholic.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 4:15:36 PM EST
Audie Murphy.

Boyington was a real character and a great pilot...but even with his time in the shithole POW camp, he doesn't quite measure up to Murphy in the guts and glory arena. Both were great heros and both deserved their MOHs.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:36:54 PM EST
Texas boy Murph all the way.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:39:39 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:11:02 PM EST
About the best Murphy biography around is "No Name on the Bullet" by Don Graham.

Murphy was an absolutely stone-cold man-killer in the war, and was basically destroyed by it.
He had all the now-classic symptoms of PTSD: inability to sustain relationships, unable to sleep, paranoia (he ALWAYS carried a gun, even in foreign countries and anti-gun cities, and slept with one at all times), and was a chronic, compulsive gambler.

Murphy NEVER drank, and was very briefly addicted to pain killers for his injuries, but quickly stopped after realizing he was hooked.
It was the gambling that was his addiction and that he couldn't shake. The gambling was his remedy for SOMETHING to equal the high of the war and to fight the numbing boredom.
Like most compulsive gamblers, Murphy never seemed to win, and even when he did, he could never seem to collect.

The author suggests watching one of Murphy's movies. Get past the baby face and take a GOOD look at his eyes. They're the eyes of a shark.

One story is about Murphy and his wife at a Hollywood party. (Murphy HATED parties).
A famous French actor, a hulking brute, was drunkly holding forth with VERY foul language.

Murphy politely asked him to not curse in front of his wife.
The Frenchman continued, daring Murphy to do something about it.

Finally Murphy went over to the French actor and motioned him down.
The Frenchman prepared to slug Murphy, who was about 1/2 his size.

Murphy, in a very quiet, polite voice told the Frenchman that he'd had enough, to get his hat and leave.
The actor started to swing, then looked into Murphy's eyes.
According to witnesses, the Frenchman turned absolutely white as a sheet, grabbed his hat, and FLED the party.
After this, whenever Murphy showed up around him he immediately left.

According to numerous witnesses, Murphy was actually the best gun handler in Hollywood.
According to Arvo Ohala?? famous Hollywood holster maker and firearms instructor, Murphy was not only faster than ANYBODY, he could do the same things with live ammo.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:22:11 PM EST
Greg "Pappy" Boyington was in the Marines from 1936(got his wings in '37) until Sept 1941 when he left for China and the AVG.

The Marine Corp didn't mind him leaving in '41 due to his drinking and fighting. In fact it was recommended that he should not be recommmended to reappointment when he left the Marines in Sept '41 .

In April of '42 he quit the AVG because of problems with Claire Chennault and in November of '42 he was reappointed to the Marine Corp as a Major due to war time conditions (shortage of trained pilots).
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:30:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:31:33 PM EST
Faris do you know where to get a copy of that book?
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:48:25 PM EST
Hands Down Audie Murphy


Citation for his MOH:


On Jan. 26, 1945, near the village of Holtzwihr in eastern France, Lt. Murphy's forward positions came under fierce attack by the Germans. Against the onslaught of six Panzer tanks and 250 infantrymen, Murphy ordered his men to fall back to better their defenses. Alone, he mounted an abandoned burning tank destroyer and, with a single machine gun, contested the enemy's advance. Wounded in the leg during the heavy fire, Murphy remained there for nearly an hour, repelling the attack of German soldiers on three side and single-handedly killing 50 of them. His courageous performance stalled the German advance and allowed him to lead his men in the counterattack which ultimately drove the enemy from Holtzwihr. For this Murphy was awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for gallantry in action.

By the war's end, Murphy had become the nation's most-decorated soldier, earning an unparalleled 28 medals, including three from France and one from Belgium. Murphy had been wounded three times during the war, yet, in May 1945, when victory was declared in Europe, he had still not reached his 21st birthday.

Link Posted: 10/7/2004 9:17:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2004 9:23:44 PM EST by JB69]
Audie Murphy without even a second thought.


Read any of the books about the man, or even his 'auto-biography' To Hell And Back and you should come to the same conclusion.

Though Boyington was a damn good officer/flyer in his own right, And I'd not slam the man in the least, he was also known for causing as many headaches as well, and In my opinion, he does get a little too much credit for the things his men did.. I mean he wasn't the only pilot in the squadron(s) Especially so regarding the AVG men.... there isn't a single one of them that was any less of a hero considering what they did...

When you read objectively written histories on both men though, you'll see that Murphy was hands down, Just an amazing individual, with not a lick of arrogance involved in the things he did during the war. He really was a brave son of a bitch, and did what had to be done, regardless of his own safety.

The man deserved every damn medal he was awarded and then some in my opinion.... Really is a terrible shame how his life ended up.. He didn't deserve it one bit.

edited because apparently I can't type worth a damn at almost 2:30 in the morning.. go figure


Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:15:06 AM EST
Also sad is that Audie Murphy died in a plane crash several miles from my house. There is now a memorial on the hill top where the plane hit. If you are interested, it is located on Brush Mountain near Blacksburg Virginia. More information at Audie Murphy Memorial

Doc
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:23:05 AM EST
Murphy.

My favorite, badass MOH account has to be Lt Bobo's....



*BOBO, JOHN P.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division (Rein), FMF. Place and date: Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, 30 March 1967.

Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Company 1 was establishing night ambush sites when the command group was attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese company supported by heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire. 2d Lt. Bobo immediately organized a hasty defense and moved from position to position encouraging the outnumbered marines despite the murderous enemy fire. Recovering a rocket launcher from among the friendly casualties, he organized a new launcher team and directed its fire into the enemy machinegun positions. When an exploding enemy mortar round severed 2d Lt. Bobo's right leg below the knee, he refused to be evacuated and insisted upon being placed in a firing position to cover the movement of the command group to a better location. With a web belt around his leg serving as a tourniquet and with his leg jammed into the dirt to curtain the bleeding, he remained in this position and delivered devastating fire into the ranks of the enemy attempting to overrun the marines. 2d Lt. Bobo was mortally wounded while firing his weapon into the main point of the enemy attack but his valiant spirit inspired his men to heroic efforts, and his tenacious stand enabled the command group to gain a protective position where it repulsed the enemy onslaught. 2d Lt. Bobo's superb leadership, dauntless courage, and bold initiative reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:29:27 AM EST

Originally Posted By MC_Man:
Has anyone read the book Baa Baa Black Sheep? It is really a good book describing Boyington's experience in a Japanese POW camp, and not about the silly show way back when. I had a chance to meet him at an air show a number of years ago. He was autographing his book. About 20 feet away was another flyer signing his book. It was the Japanese pilot that shot Pappy down.



That Japanese pilot was Masajiro "Mike" Kuwato. Those of us who used to do the WAC (Washington arms collectors) shows up in Puyallup used to see him there with a display and his book (Bye Bye Blacksheep) for sale. I got an autographed copy from him back in '99. Hard-core little dude
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:30:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 3:30:51 AM EST by 1-75Ranger]
Either, but I tend to go with Audie. The truth is that the world is a free place because of these men and the men like them that stood up for the call of duty.

Maybe we need to remind some members of the EU on the duty that OUR men did to free Europe and the pacific theater.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:09:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 4:11:15 AM EST by eodtech2000]
Audie Murphy!!!

Now a Legend of Airpower, Gen James Doolittle - the complete package of brains, leadership, and toughness. MOH awarded on the Tokyo raid, personaly flew the B-26 to show the crews that it could be flown safely using his newly developed landing procedures (the B-26 crews were going to refuse to fly it until Doolittle flew).

My favorite MOH awardee, whom I met in 91, is CSM Franklin "Doug" Miller (callsign "Blackdog"). If you look up badass in the dictionary you find his pic there with few others like Audie Murphy.


MILLER, FRANKLIN D.

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 5th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces. Place and date: Kontum province, Republic of Vietnam, 5 January 1970. Entered service at: Albuquerque, N. Mex. Born: 27 January 1945, Elizabeth City, N.C.
Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt. Miller, 5th Special Forces Group, distinguished himself while serving as team leader of an American-Vietnamese long-range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy controlled territory. Leaving the helicopter insertion point, the patrol moved forward on its mission. Suddenly, 1 of the team members tripped a hostile booby trap which wounded 4 soldiers. S/Sgt. Miller, knowing that the explosion would alert the enemy, quickly administered first aid to the wounded and directed the team into positions across a small stream bed at the base of a steep hill. Within a few minutes, S/Sgt. Miller saw the lead element of what he estimated to be a platoon-size enemy force moving toward his location. Concerned for the safety of his men, he directed the small team to move up the hill to a more secure position. He remained alone, separated from the patrol, to meet the attack. S/Sgt. Miller single-handedly repulsed 2 determined attacks by the numerically superior enemy force and caused them to withdraw in disorder. He rejoined his team, established contact with a forward air controller and arranged the evacuation of his patrol. However, the only suitable extraction location in the heavy jungle was a bomb crater some 150 meters from the team location. S/Sgt. Miller reconnoitered the route to the crater and led his men through the enemy controlled jungle to the extraction site. As the evacuation helicopter hovered over the crater to pick up the patrol, the enemy launched a savage automatic weapon and rocket-propelled grenade attack against the beleaguered team, driving off the rescue helicopter. S/Sgt. Miller led the team in a valiant defense which drove back the enemy in its attempt to overrun the small patrol. Although seriously wounded and with every man in his patrol a casualty, S/Sgt. Miller moved forward to again single-handedly meet the hostile attackers. From his forward exposed position, S/Sgt. Miller gallantly repelled 2 attacks by the enemy before a friendly relief force reached the patrol location. S/Sgt. Miller's gallantry, intrepidity in action, and selfless devotion to the welfare of his comrades are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.



Doug at home.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:22:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 4:24:10 AM EST by Coolio]
Sorry, but NO contest - Audie Murphy.

THE most decorated U.S. soldier of WWII. His list of decorations is unbeliveable. I have it at home so I can't pull it out and post it, but it includes top awards from foreign governments as well. Truly impressive.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:23:31 AM EST
Audie Murphy, without a doubt.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:26:10 AM EST
Pappy Boyington for me. I've barely heard of Audie Murphy
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:37:13 AM EST
The History Channel has a program on right now about Boyington.

BTW, we should never compare two American heroes to see who is "best". The correct answer is that they ALL were.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:51:59 AM EST
CHRISTIAN, HERBERT F.

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Valmontone, Italy, 2-3 June 1944. Entered service at: Steubenville, Ohio. Birth: Byersville, Ohio. G.O. No.: 43, 30 May 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 2-3 June 1944, at 1 a.m., Pvt. Christian elected to sacrifice his life in order that his comrades might extricate themselves from an ambush. Braving massed fire of about 60 riflemen, 3 machineguns, and 3 tanks from positions only 30 yards distant, he stood erect and signaled to the patrol to withdraw. The whole area was brightly illuminated by enemy flares. Although his right leg was severed above the knee by cannon fire, Pvt. Christian advanced on his left knee and the bloody stump of his right thigh, firing his submachinegun. Despite excruciating pain, Pvt. Christian continued on his self-assigned mission. He succeeded in distracting the enemy and enabled his 12 comrades to escape. He killed 3 enemy soldiers almost at once. Leaving a trail of blood behind him, he made his way forward 20 yards, halted at a point within 10 yards of the enemy, and despite intense fire killed a machine-pistol man. Reloading his weapon, he fired directly into the enemy position. The enemy appeared enraged at the success of his ruse, concentrated 20-mm. machinegun, machine-pistol and rifle fire on him, yet he refused to seek cover. Maintaining his erect position, Pvt. Christian fired his weapon to the very last. Just as he emptied his submachinegun, the enemy bullets found their mark and Pvt. Christian slumped forward dead. The courage and spirit of self-sacrifice displayed by this soldier were an inspiration to his comrades and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces.

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:05:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
Murphy.

My favorite, badass MOH account has to be Lt Bobo's....



*BOBO, JOHN P.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division (Rein), FMF. Place and date: Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, 30 March 1967.

Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Company 1 was establishing night ambush sites when the command group was attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese company supported by heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire. 2d Lt. Bobo immediately organized a hasty defense and moved from position to position encouraging the outnumbered marines despite the murderous enemy fire. Recovering a rocket launcher from among the friendly casualties, he organized a new launcher team and directed its fire into the enemy machinegun positions. When an exploding enemy mortar round severed 2d Lt. Bobo's right leg below the knee, he refused to be evacuated and insisted upon being placed in a firing position to cover the movement of the command group to a better location. With a web belt around his leg serving as a tourniquet and with his leg jammed into the dirt to curtain the bleeding, he remained in this position and delivered devastating fire into the ranks of the enemy attempting to overrun the marines. 2d Lt. Bobo was mortally wounded while firing his weapon into the main point of the enemy attack but his valiant spirit inspired his men to heroic efforts, and his tenacious stand enabled the command group to gain a protective position where it repulsed the enemy onslaught. 2d Lt. Bobo's superb leadership, dauntless courage, and bold initiative reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.




I can't read MOH citations without getting a huge lump in my throat. The show PBS did on Medal recipients had me in tears many times. That anyone gets one and lives is a miracle. And *to* get one, it has to be observed by others-- many more men should have received one but simply didn't have observers...

+1 on Audie Murphy too- his "To Hell And Back" should be mandatory reading.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:10:31 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:19:28 AM EST
Audie Murphy all the way.

ARH

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:23:30 AM EST
BOTH - Along with all the rest.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:30:51 AM EST


FREEDOM FLIES IN YOUR HEART LIKE AN EAGLE

Dusty old helmet, rusty old gun,
They sit in the corner and wait -
Two souvenirs of the Second World War
That have withstood the time, and the hate.

Mute witness to a time of much trouble.
Where kill or be killed was the law -
Were these implements used with high honor?
What was the glory they saw?

Many times I've wanted to ask them -
And now that we're here all alone,
Relics all three of a long ago war -
Where has freedom gone?

Freedom flies in your heart like an eagle.
Let it soar with the winds high above
Among the spirits of soldiers now sleeping,
Guard it with care and with love.

I salute my old friends in the corner,
I agree with all they have said -
And if the moment of truth comes tomorrow,
I'll be free, or By God, I'll be dead!

. . . Audie Murphy



Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:33:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:
The History Channel has a program on right now about Boyington.

BTW, we should never compare two American heroes to see who is "best". The correct answer is that they ALL were.



Definately agree! I started this thread for the hero stories. They are both my heros!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:45:37 AM EST
Both heros. Can't get a CMH (or Vic Cross!) without being one, and if you get one and LIVE you are a genuine 100% superman.

Between them though, Murphy has the edge with me.

Also of note, Murphy collected 3 purple hearts (and reportedly turned down others because his wounds weren't bad enough, like many other soldiers of the time) and didn't decide to go home or later use it as his platform to try and become president.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:59:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 7:53:41 AM EST by Sukebe]
Murphy and Boyington were both great warriors. Both had deep character flaws that they struggled with all of their lives. Boyington was known to stretch the truth about his accomplishments. I've never heard that about Murphy.
However, there are other men that have been awarded the MOH that went on with their lives out of the public eye. They served, they did their duty, they went on with their lives. Many of them could be you neighbor and you'd never know about their heroism.

As far as Murphy and Boyington being legends, To aviation types, Boyington would get the nod. To Grunts, it would go to Murphy.
My personal choice is Joe Foss. He weathered the storm of heroism and kept his shit together. The exception to the "Show me a hero and I'll prove he's a bum" rule.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 6:02:44 AM EST
*HARTSOCK, ROBERT W.

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 44th Infantry Platoon, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry
Division. Place and date: Hau Nghia, Province, Republic of Vietnam, 23 February 1969. Entered
service at: Fairmont, W. Va. Born: 24 January 1945, Cumberland, Md. Citation: For conspicuous
gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt.
Hartsock, distinguished himself in action while serving as section leader with the 44th Infantry
Platoon. When the Dau Tieng Base Camp came under a heavy enemy rocket and mortar attack,
S/Sgt. Hartsock and his platoon commander spotted an enemy sapper squad which had infiltrated
the camp undetected. Realizing the enemy squad was heading for the brigade tactical operations
center and nearby prisoner compound, they concealed themselves and, although heavily
outnumbered, awaited the approach of the hostile soldiers. When the enemy was almost upon
them, S/Sgt. Hartsock and his platoon commander opened fire on the squad. As a wounded enemy
soldier fell, he managed to detonate a satchel charge he was carrying. S/Sgt. Hartsock, with
complete disregard for his life, threw himself on the charge and was gravely wounded. In spite of
his wounds, S/Sgt. Hartsock crawled about 5 meters to a ditch and provided heavy suppressive
fire, completely pinning down the enemy and allowing his commander to seek shelter. S/Sgt.
Hartsock continued his deadly stream of fire until he succumbed to his wounds.
S/Sgt. Hartsock's
extraordinary heroism and profound concern for the lives of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with
the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

My cousin
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:38:12 AM EST
Pappy Boyington was my hero growing up. I was able to meet him just before he passed away at a air show in my home town Chino Ca. He was a hell of a fighter pilot!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:42:48 AM EST
No contest Murphy
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:47:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:
CHRISTIAN, HERBERT F.

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Valmontone, Italy, 2-3 June 1944. Entered service at: Steubenville, Ohio. Birth: Byersville, Ohio. G.O. No.: 43, 30 May 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 2-3 June 1944, at 1 a.m., Pvt. Christian elected to sacrifice his life in order that his comrades might extricate themselves from an ambush. Braving massed fire of about 60 riflemen, 3 machineguns, and 3 tanks from positions only 30 yards distant, he stood erect and signaled to the patrol to withdraw. The whole area was brightly illuminated by enemy flares. Although his right leg was severed above the knee by cannon fire, Pvt. Christian advanced on his left knee and the bloody stump of his right thigh, firing his submachinegun. Despite excruciating pain, Pvt. Christian continued on his self-assigned mission. He succeeded in distracting the enemy and enabled his 12 comrades to escape. He killed 3 enemy soldiers almost at once. Leaving a trail of blood behind him, he made his way forward 20 yards, halted at a point within 10 yards of the enemy, and despite intense fire killed a machine-pistol man. Reloading his weapon, he fired directly into the enemy position. The enemy appeared enraged at the success of his ruse, concentrated 20-mm. machinegun, machine-pistol and rifle fire on him, yet he refused to seek cover. Maintaining his erect position, Pvt. Christian fired his weapon to the very last. Just as he emptied his submachinegun, the enemy bullets found their mark and Pvt. Christian slumped forward dead. The courage and spirit of self-sacrifice displayed by this soldier were an inspiration to his comrades and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces.




Damn, that's as rugged as Lt Bobo.

We are indeed lucky to have had men such as this.

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:54:24 AM EST
+1 for Murphy, but may be because I am most familiar with his story.

Still remember where I was EXACTLY when I heard his plane was missing. I was 11 years old.

I still have the old scrapbook with the newspaper clipping showing the plane wreckage.

Hats off to ALL of our hero's, past and present.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 8:10:34 AM EST
The Texas boy, of course.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:02:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:
CHRISTIAN, HERBERT F.

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Valmontone, Italy, 2-3 June 1944. Entered service at: Steubenville, Ohio. Birth: Byersville, Ohio. G.O. No.: 43, 30 May 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 2-3 June 1944, at 1 a.m., Pvt. Christian elected to sacrifice his life in order that his comrades might extricate themselves from an ambush. Braving massed fire of about 60 riflemen, 3 machineguns, and 3 tanks from positions only 30 yards distant, he stood erect and signaled to the patrol to withdraw. The whole area was brightly illuminated by enemy flares. Although his right leg was severed above the knee by cannon fire, Pvt. Christian advanced on his left knee and the bloody stump of his right thigh, firing his submachinegun. Despite excruciating pain, Pvt. Christian continued on his self-assigned mission. He succeeded in distracting the enemy and enabled his 12 comrades to escape. He killed 3 enemy soldiers almost at once. Leaving a trail of blood behind him, he made his way forward 20 yards, halted at a point within 10 yards of the enemy, and despite intense fire killed a machine-pistol man. Reloading his weapon, he fired directly into the enemy position. The enemy appeared enraged at the success of his ruse, concentrated 20-mm. machinegun, machine-pistol and rifle fire on him, yet he refused to seek cover. Maintaining his erect position, Pvt. Christian fired his weapon to the very last. Just as he emptied his submachinegun, the enemy bullets found their mark and Pvt. Christian slumped forward dead. The courage and spirit of self-sacrifice displayed by this soldier were an inspiration to his comrades and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces.




Damn, that's as rugged as Lt Bobo.

We are indeed lucky to have had men such as this.




I couldn't find the one I was thinking of.

Soldier who was dragging wounded soldiers to safety, through a filed exposed to enemy fire from at least 2 sides. Shot through one leg, injured so bad a bit of muscle and skin was all that was keeping the leg on. He self amputated, and made at least one other trip. Saved 7-10 other soldiers, AND LIVED.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:13:29 AM EST
Another vote for "Little Texas"
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:25:13 AM EST
Audie Murphy was true hero… of that there can be no dispute… but he did not influence the war…

Boyington however DID influence the war and stopped the Japs over the Solomons. His Corsairs and the Pilots who flew them gave the Japs their first big bloody nose in Air to Air combat… Boyington was the man who got the US back into the saddle in air combat. Before Boyington it was defeat or holding their own for the US in air combat … after him the Japs knew the game had changed.

Andy
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:33:47 AM EST
I think in pure foot-to-ass type asskicking, Audie Murphy was the MAN.

Someone should make a more modern movie about him.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:42:04 AM EST
Franklin Miller -" Reflections Of A Warrior " Great Book


Heroes are those who over our Country's History have answered The Call Of Duty and served and those who Gave Their Lives.
So many never got to tell their stories.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:55:46 PM EST
I think Audie but many here as well as Audie and Lee Marvin slept with a .45 under thier pillow at night!

God bless them all !!!

Bob
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:59:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By faris:
Audie Murphy.

The cold fact is, mention Pappy Boyington to the average person, and they have NO idea who you're talking about.

Mention Audie Murphy, and they remember he was an actor who was a hero in SOME war.



Yeh, but if you mention "Ba ba black sheep", most Americans who watched TV back in the 80s will remember William Conrad.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:53:10 PM EST
Boyington was a great fighter, but a major disappointment to the leadership of the Army and later Air Force.

One General, (I think it was Lemay) said in the 1960's, "Damn that Boyington, he could have been a major influence on the Air Force and certainly it's fighter commander and theoretician, if the SOB could have just put the cork back in the bottle".
It was drinking that cost the Air Force AND Boyington an important career.

I got the book "No Name on the Bullet" about Murphy on inter-library loan at my local library. You can also buy it on Amazon.

Another Murphy story.
In Italy, a senior officer and his aids were up front to take a look and got lost too near the German lines.
Murphy, figuring they would get in trouble, went after them.
Finding them under heavy fire from German machine guns, Murphy worked his way around, tossed a grenade among them, then coldly killed the rest with shots from his "lucky" M1 carbine.

After finishing them off, he ambled over to the officers and started joking with them.
The senior officer saw that Murphy got one of his medals, and later said that Murphy was the coldest killer he ever saw. He'd killed a fair number of Germans with no more fuss than stepping on ants.

Soon after the war, Murphy was just back home in Texas.
Driving an old pickup and still wearing fatigues, he stopped at a country crossroads gas station.
Two LARGE men were giving a woman a hard way to go.
Murphy, in his usual polite way, asked them to stop.
They figured to beat Murphy up.
According to a number of witnesses, Murphy literally wiped the gravel parking lot with the two bigger men, until they were begging and crying for him to stop.

One man said it reminded him of how a 75 pound dog could savage a 200 pound man.

Once on a movie shoot in the California desert, Murphy amazed, (and frightened) an entire movie crew as he used his Colt six gun to shoot every rat, snake, and varmint within sight of the crew. They later said they never saw anyone who could actually shoot a six gun like that, and it frightened them because Murphy was in a bad mood that day.

Many people over the years remarked how men (NEVER women) were uncomfortable around Murphy. Someone said it was like being in a room with a very quiet, but very wild wolf.
A number of people who knew said that Murphy would have zero trouble with killing someone if he thought there was a reason.

Murphy's biggest problem was mind-numbing BOREDOM, and most of his problems came from looking for something to match the excitement of the war, even though he hated the war and what it'd done to him.

Like all real hero's, he always said that the only hero's were the men who didn't come back.

His later years were very sad. The Vietnam era wanted no Western movies about hero's, his career over, chronically broke from his compulsive and heavy gambling, Murphy sort of wandered through life without direction.
All those years after the war, Murphy was still a casualty.
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