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Posted: 10/22/2013 12:18:36 PM EST
Just a glimpse into the messes I tend to get myself into.

This brick chimney is being used to vent a fuel oil boiler and it is well past it's prime. It probably could have been prevented years ago with a regular inspection and repair, but now the whole thing has to come down. It was just about ready to collapse right onto the roof, I was able to take it apart just by picking up the bricks, practically no mortar bond left and just gravity holding it together.



45 buckets lowered down 4 sections of roof jacks and then 5 sections of scaffold. Can't wait to hoist the new stuff back up tomorrow.



Link Posted: 10/22/2013 12:54:10 PM EST
Glad you caught that in time.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:10:52 PM EST
Mine would have been on that road as well, but luckily I caught it before it failed. Some mortar damage, but still sound. I did wind up casting in place a new concrete crown with proper drip edge. On a 4x4 foot square chimney (don't ask, house built in the 50's, was a design element) that was a pita.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:17:08 PM EST
Are you going to recommend they bring in a roofer to properly flash that chimney?
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:20:14 PM EST
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:37:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Are you going to recommend they bring in a roofer to properly flash that chimney?
View Quote


He is coming in behind me to reshingle the whole house and put new flashing on the chimney.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:11:05 PM EST
No liner in the flue either? How long has it been around?
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:13:27 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hooligan223:
Are you going to recommend they bring in a roofer to properly flash that chimney?
View Quote

Nothing 54 tubes of black-jack can't handle!
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:16:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:21:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.
View Quote

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:24:18 PM EST
I'm going up on moms roof w/ a mason next weekend . There has been a leak from damaged flashing that requires a mason to replace .
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:34:22 PM EST
We used to have a member here named “sweep” (or something similar). A chimney guy.

He was also a moderator if I remember correctly.

I wonder if he is still around since he might be a good resource for this thread.

Mike

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:49:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gastard:
I'm going up on moms roof w/ a mason next weekend . There has been a leak from damaged flashing that requires a mason to replace .
View Quote


Did you have a roofer up there yet?

I can flash in chimneys, but whenever possible I leave it to a roofer since they do a lot more of it so they can typically do it faster and cheaper.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:53:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 2:53:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 2:54:42 PM EST by BustinCaps]
OP, next spring do yourself a huge favor...

Look up CrownCoat and Chimney Saver. Apply. Enjoy years of happiness.

And for the love of everything holy, tell me there is a liner in that chimney, or their will be.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:02:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Aimless:
Bricks started falling off my office (I rent , thank God) this spring, there have been two guys there remortaring for about six weeks, I shudder at the cost
View Quote

Damn....Do they look like this guy?

Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:05:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.


The only thing that struck me as odd is multiple bricks are cracked straight through. I've seen lightning hits that look like a fat man sat on it, all the way to apparent RPGs.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:14:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
OP, next spring do yourself a huge favor...

Look up CrownCoat and Chimney Saver. Apply. Enjoy years of happiness.

And for the love of everything holy, tell me there is a liner in that chimney, or their will be.
View Quote


Blech, bandaids.

The liner isn't my gig. A separate company will need to come in and put in a stainless liner, if they want one.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:14:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.


I am amazed at the risks I see people take. They don't give a shit. Just like cars, most people wait until it is a huge problem they can't possibly avoid before doing anything. Then, when they have no choice, they seek the cheapest, duct-tape and bondo solution possible.

I'm glad I'm no longer a sweep. I loved the work, but I hated hearing how I was wrong and cousin Jeb was right. Cousin Jeb was only right because his idea was easy and free.

It's funny, too. If I had a dime for every supposed "prepper" with the shittiest cobbled-ass ragfuck wood heating setup ever, I'd be rich. I thought preppers were about long-term sustainability.

People don't fix a roof till the drywall is on their head.
People don't change tires until they hydroplane into a ravine.
Brakes? They still stop. Turn up the radio. Same for bearings and CV joints.
Decks? Why waterproof them.
Furnace? I got a free CO detector from the fire department.
Healthcare? .gov bro!

Sorry. /rant

This is the time of year everyone decides to risk everything by ignoring and avoiding a simple solution. They tend to post here about how dramatic their lives are. Go figure.

Thanks for the PSA, OP. The world needs all it can get.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:15:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Damn....Do they look like this guy?
http://gigabiting.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/milkman1.jpg
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
Originally Posted By Aimless:
Bricks started falling off my office (I rent , thank God) this spring, there have been two guys there remortaring for about six weeks, I shudder at the cost

Damn....Do they look like this guy?
http://gigabiting.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/milkman1.jpg


A running joke we had forever was wearing Byrne Dairy hats on tedious jobs.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:15:59 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Blech, bandaids.

The liner isn't my gig. A separate company will need to come in and put in a stainless liner, if they want one.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
OP, next spring do yourself a huge favor...

Look up CrownCoat and Chimney Saver. Apply. Enjoy years of happiness.

And for the love of everything holy, tell me there is a liner in that chimney, or their will be.


Blech, bandaids.

The liner isn't my gig. A separate company will need to come in and put in a stainless liner, if they want one.


bandaids? LOLWUT? Water is the reason you are seeing that damage! Proper waterproofing after rebuild will extend the life of the chimney significantly.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:18:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:


I am amazed at the risks I see people take. They don't give a shit. Just like cars, most people wait until it is a huge problem they can't possibly avoid before doing anything. Then, when they have no choice, they seek the cheapest, duct-tape and bondo solution possible.

I'm glad I'm no longer a sweep. I loved the work, but I hated hearing how I was wrong and cousin Jeb was right. Cousin Jeb was only right because his idea was easy and free.

It's funny, too. If I had a dime for every supposed "prepper" with the shittiest cobbled-ass ragfuck wood heating setup ever, I'd be rich. I thought preppers were about long-term sustainability.

People don't fix a roof till the drywall is on their head.
People don't change tires until they hydroplane into a ravine.
Brakes? They still stop. Turn up the radio. Same for bearings and CV joints.
Decks? Why waterproof them.
Furnace? I got a free CO detector from the fire department.
Healthcare? .gov bro!

Sorry. /rant

This is the time of year everyone decides to risk everything by ignoring and avoiding a simple solution. They tend to post here about how dramatic their lives are. Go figure.

Thanks for the PSA, OP. The world needs all it can get.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.


I am amazed at the risks I see people take. They don't give a shit. Just like cars, most people wait until it is a huge problem they can't possibly avoid before doing anything. Then, when they have no choice, they seek the cheapest, duct-tape and bondo solution possible.

I'm glad I'm no longer a sweep. I loved the work, but I hated hearing how I was wrong and cousin Jeb was right. Cousin Jeb was only right because his idea was easy and free.

It's funny, too. If I had a dime for every supposed "prepper" with the shittiest cobbled-ass ragfuck wood heating setup ever, I'd be rich. I thought preppers were about long-term sustainability.

People don't fix a roof till the drywall is on their head.
People don't change tires until they hydroplane into a ravine.
Brakes? They still stop. Turn up the radio. Same for bearings and CV joints.
Decks? Why waterproof them.
Furnace? I got a free CO detector from the fire department.
Healthcare? .gov bro!

Sorry. /rant

This is the time of year everyone decides to risk everything by ignoring and avoiding a simple solution. They tend to post here about how dramatic their lives are. Go figure.

Thanks for the PSA, OP. The world needs all it can get.


This time of year sucks. It could snow any day and I get calls from people saying "I need to fire up the furnace/woodstove this week and we need 10 ft of chimney replaced....can you get here by the end of the week?"

Sure, I will put you in front of the 5 others that called this month, they will appreciate that.

I never get chimney calls in the summer, at least not for repairs.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:19:30 PM EST
Is that lead flashing I see

That would make some nice bullets
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:19:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:


bandaids? LOLWUT? Water is the reason you are seeing that damage! Proper waterproofing after rebuild will extend the life of the chimney significantly.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
OP, next spring do yourself a huge favor...

Look up CrownCoat and Chimney Saver. Apply. Enjoy years of happiness.

And for the love of everything holy, tell me there is a liner in that chimney, or their will be.


Blech, bandaids.

The liner isn't my gig. A separate company will need to come in and put in a stainless liner, if they want one.


bandaids? LOLWUT? Water is the reason you are seeing that damage! Proper waterproofing after rebuild will extend the life of the chimney significantly.


Doesn't crowncoat go over a crown to seal cracks and spalling? I would rather just pour a new crown.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:20:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pv74:
Is that lead flashing I see

That would make some nice bullets
View Quote


Tin......I checked
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:24:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 3:25:27 PM EST by BustinCaps]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Doesn't crowncoat go over a crown to seal cracks and spalling? I would rather just pour a new crown.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
OP, next spring do yourself a huge favor...

Look up CrownCoat and Chimney Saver. Apply. Enjoy years of happiness.

And for the love of everything holy, tell me there is a liner in that chimney, or their will be.


Blech, bandaids.

The liner isn't my gig. A separate company will need to come in and put in a stainless liner, if they want one.


bandaids? LOLWUT? Water is the reason you are seeing that damage! Proper waterproofing after rebuild will extend the life of the chimney significantly.


Doesn't crowncoat go over a crown to seal cracks and spalling? I would rather just pour a new crown.


It will seal the cracks, but it is great over a new crown because it prevents water penetration and erosion. It is flexible enough that a crack forming underneath won't take moisture.

I pour a concrete crown with forms that include a drip edge, too. It significantly reduces the amount of water running over the brick surface.

Trust me, a concrete crown with drip edge coated in crown coat and a freshly built chimney sealed with chimney saver will out last any other contraption by decades.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:26:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 3:27:06 PM EST by sitdwnandhngon]
This one isn't getting a crown by me.

The liner company will have to bend a metal one.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:28:35 PM EST
Ah. I take it these people want it fixed cheap as possible, bare minimum?
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:30:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 3:32:07 PM EST by sitdwnandhngon]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Ah. I take it these people want it fixed cheap as possible, bare minimum?
View Quote


They just wanted a direct replacement. I am going to corbel the top out though to give it a better look.

Regardless, that sucker was just about ready to tip over. The roofer actually told them to call a mason, they saw the roof was shot and when he was up there checking it out said the chimney was about ready to take a crap.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:31:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Aimless:
Bricks started falling off my office (I rent , thank God) this spring, there have been two guys there remortaring for about six weeks, I shudder at the cost
View Quote

That's gotta be painful!
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:31:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 3:35:23 PM EST by DOW]
I had my chimney relined 3 years ago and repointed it last year. Better safe than sorry.


Whereabouts in NY OP?


Also, what is the approximate cost for this type of job, just out of curiosity?
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:32:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DOW:
I had my chimney relined 3 years ago and repointed it last year. Better safe than sorry.


Whereabouts in NY OP?
View Quote


Cortland County
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:34:38 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:35:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:


The only thing that struck me as odd is multiple bricks are cracked straight through. I've seen lightning hits that look like a fat man sat on it, all the way to apparent RPGs.
View Quote


Cracked bricks can actually be caused by using mortar that is too strong. Bricks usually require a Type N mortar which has a lower compressive strength than Type S. The idea is that if there is a failure of any kind the mortar joints will be cracked instead of the brick and you can grind out any problems and repoint them.

Notice there is almost no mortar at the bottom from weathering, that likely made it begin to drop, and the rebuilt stuff near the top was held togther with a tougher Type S and it just snapped causing some of the bricks to crack.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:40:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ZW17:
Also, get it cleaned if you burn solid fuels....

http://mavenrestoration.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chimney-fire-prevention.jpg

View Quote


Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:41:53 PM EST
Huh, can this be a problem if the chimney is never used? I think around here they are just for decoration. . .
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:45:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Did you have a roofer up there yet?

I can flash in chimneys, but whenever possible I leave it to a roofer since they do a lot more of it so they can typically do it faster and cheaper.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Gastard:
I'm going up on moms roof w/ a mason next weekend . There has been a leak from damaged flashing that requires a mason to replace .


Did you have a roofer up there yet?

I can flash in chimneys, but whenever possible I leave it to a roofer since they do a lot more of it so they can typically do it faster and cheaper.


I myself can pass as a proficient carpenter to cut the shingle back in . The joints in the veneer that hold the flashing have broken apart and are falling
out . They now leak , it needs more than another coat of silicon calk to be done correctly . . . yes ?
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:46:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Miracle_Pants:
Huh, can this be a problem if the chimney is never used? I think around here they are just for decoration. . .
View Quote


Most of that damage was from weather, the inside looked just fine even though there is a boiler venting into it.

This is a pretty extreme case though, years without any repair, and the repair before it was just slapped together.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:48:46 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gastard:


I myself can pass as a proficient carpenter to cut the shingle back in . The joints in the veneer that hold the flashing have broken apart and are falling
out . They now leak , it needs more than another coat of silicon calk to be done correctly . . . yes ?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gastard:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Gastard:
I'm going up on moms roof w/ a mason next weekend . There has been a leak from damaged flashing that requires a mason to replace .


Did you have a roofer up there yet?

I can flash in chimneys, but whenever possible I leave it to a roofer since they do a lot more of it so they can typically do it faster and cheaper.


I myself can pass as a proficient carpenter to cut the shingle back in . The joints in the veneer that hold the flashing have broken apart and are falling
out . They now leak , it needs more than another coat of silicon calk to be done correctly . . . yes ?


You can grind out the morart joints a bit and caulk the step flashing back in, then counter flash over it with wall flashing, which is put up parallel to the roof.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:48:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Cracked bricks can actually be caused by using mortar that is too strong. Bricks usually require a Type N mortar which has a lower compressive strength than Type S. The idea is that if there is a failure of any kind the mortar joints will be cracked instead of the brick and you can grind out any problems and repoint them.

Notice there is almost no mortar at the bottom from weathering, that likely made it begin to drop, and the rebuilt stuff near the top was held togther with a tougher Type S and it just snapped causing some of the bricks to crack.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:


The only thing that struck me as odd is multiple bricks are cracked straight through. I've seen lightning hits that look like a fat man sat on it, all the way to apparent RPGs.


Cracked bricks can actually be caused by using mortar that is too strong. Bricks usually require a Type N mortar which has a lower compressive strength than Type S. The idea is that if there is a failure of any kind the mortar joints will be cracked instead of the brick and you can grind out any problems and repoint them.

Notice there is almost no mortar at the bottom from weathering, that likely made it begin to drop, and the rebuilt stuff near the top was held togther with a tougher Type S and it just snapped causing some of the bricks to crack.


I'm calling you next time I have to deal with someone's busted ass chimney.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:53:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:


Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By ZW17:
Also, get it cleaned if you burn solid fuels....

http://mavenrestoration.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chimney-fire-prevention.jpg



Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.


So are the clothes from the Red Cross .
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:57:43 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gastard:


So are the clothes from the Red Cross .
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gastard:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By ZW17:
Also, get it cleaned if you burn solid fuels....

http://mavenrestoration.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chimney-fire-prevention.jpg



Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.


So are the clothes from the Red Cross .


Small chimney fires (very small) are actually a healthy part of the lifecycle of your liner. Each day you should run your wood stove at full throttle for 15-30 minutes, it can cause small build ups to flame up for a few minutes and quickly burn off, then when you go to sweep the stuff that is left just flakes right off.

What is really scary is when people damper their stoves right down for weeks a time and a thick glaze of creosote builds up. That stuff is miserable to sweep out and can cause pure havoc if it lights up.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 3:58:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 3:59:59 PM EST by Luchs]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.


Worse. One I toured before buying a different house here was about that age, and it had a central chimney fed by six fireplaces. The old kitchen hearth had a massive old cast iron stove in it with the pipe ending about two feet inside the flue. None of the other fireplaces had dampers. The whole thing was unlined. There were visible creosote leaks in the attic.

This one? Two chimneys from basement to roof, four flues, all lined. One that was not in use was capped in the finished part of the basement. I opened the lower cover on a windy day and it was like opening a vacuum cleaner, a sudden "WOOSH" of air. "GOOD DRAW!"
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:08:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Luchs:


Worse. One I toured before buying a different house here was about that age, and it had a central chimney fed by six fireplaces. The old kitchen hearth had a massive old cast iron stove in it with the pipe ending about two feet inside the flue. None of the other fireplaces had dampers. The whole thing was unlined. There were visible creosote leaks in the attic.

This one? Two chimneys from basement to roof, four flues, all lined. One that was not in use was capped in the finished part of the basement. I opened the lower cover on a windy day and it was like opening a vacuum cleaner, a sudden "WOOSH" of air. "GOOD DRAW!"
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Originally Posted By Luchs:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Skinnywater:
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
That looks eerily like a lightning strike. Was the chimney cap messed up at all?


Also, those are T-lock shingles. Don't mess one up... They don't make them anymore.

We had a strike 2 years ago, looked like an rpg hit it. Seriously, shrapnel went thru the ridge cap and landed over a hundred feet away.
OP's looks like weathering of the mortar.


Yup. It is just weathered. About a quarter of it was re-laid in the last 20 years, poorly. The rest has been ground and and grouted back in a few times, but half the brick on the backside was just deteriorated and crumbling.

As far as age the house is from the 1800's, so the chimney may be original down to the basement.

The really scary part, all around here there are brick chimneys in old houses that look worse than that, and people have the balls to burn wood with them. Crazy, most of the old ones don't have liners either.


Worse. One I toured before buying a different house here was about that age, and it had a central chimney fed by six fireplaces. The old kitchen hearth had a massive old cast iron stove in it with the pipe ending about two feet inside the flue. None of the other fireplaces had dampers. The whole thing was unlined. There were visible creosote leaks in the attic.

This one? Two chimneys from basement to roof, four flues, all lined. One that was not in use was capped in the finished part of the basement. I opened the lower cover on a windy day and it was like opening a vacuum cleaner, a sudden "WOOSH" of air. "GOOD DRAW!"


I can beat that.

I demo'd a house last year and each bedroom upstairs had a hardwood box built with shelves in it and sitting on top of those shelves there were unlined block chimneys. Each room at one point had it's own wood stove venting into an unsupported and unlined chimney.

I have never seen so much creosote leakage as I saw on those rafters, when we first torn out the ceilings we thought the place had been on fire in the past, everything was jet black.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:10:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Small chimney fires (very small) are actually a healthy part of the lifecycle of your liner. Each day you should run your wood stove at full throttle for 15-30 minutes, it can cause small build ups to flame up for a few minutes and quickly burn off, then when you go to sweep the stuff that is left just flakes right off.

What is really scary is when people damper their stoves right down for weeks a time and a thick glaze of creosote builds up. That stuff is miserable to sweep out and can cause pure havoc if it lights up.
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Gastard:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By ZW17:
Also, get it cleaned if you burn solid fuels....

http://mavenrestoration.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chimney-fire-prevention.jpg



Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.


So are the clothes from the Red Cross .


Small chimney fires (very small) are actually a healthy part of the lifecycle of your liner. Each day you should run your wood stove at full throttle for 15-30 minutes, it can cause small build ups to flame up for a few minutes and quickly burn off, then when you go to sweep the stuff that is left just flakes right off.

What is really scary is when people damper their stoves right down for weeks a time and a thick glaze of creosote builds up. That stuff is miserable to sweep out and can cause pure havoc if it lights up.


Yea . .you're talkin' about me . More the problem is the woodstove is mounted in front of the fireplace w/ the backvent plumbed up the flue through
a steel plate . The chimney is well built w/ an intact ceramic liner , but the chimney has so much mass it's difficult to get the chimney itself up to temp
w/out sweating us out of the house .
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:13:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 4:15:59 PM EST by Luchs]
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
I can beat that.

I demo'd a house last year and each bedroom upstairs had a hardwood box built with shelves in it and sitting on top of those shelves there were unlined block chimneys. Each room at one point had it's own wood stove venting into an unsupported and unlined chimney.

I have never seen so much creosote leakage as I saw on those rafters, when we first torn out the ceilings we thought the place had been on fire in the past, everything was jet black.
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That sounds like one of those Victorian era "kill everyone" houses. Did you find any poorly laid out coalgas lines, too?

I'll also add that this house's second floor wiring consisted of Romex jammed behind radiators and hacked into walls to plugs with no box, all of it supplied by a loose, dangling piece of Romex beside the front door. I don't know what they were thinking.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:14:59 PM EST
I just had a sweep in yesterday before I fired anything up. House was built in 1944 and has a Kodiak insert in the basement fireplace and another chimney with 2 flies, one for a fireplace and one for an oil boiler.

Ho

Lee

Shit!

The insert in the basement was an old direct connect but they shoved it into a Heatilator type fireplace. He gave me a number for an 8" as liner, and I asked about repairing the flashing as well. He says "What flashing? There's just some j channel from the siding shoved in there." Turns out the flashing repairs were already in the quote and he did some quick and dirty caulking as a bandaid until he could come back.

The other chimney was the real winner. turns out there only *appears* to be 2 flues. Once the boiler flee makes it up from the basement it joins the fireplace flu where the smoke chamber should be and forms one gigantic chamber up to the crown. There is a stub of a Terra cotta liner sticking out where the boiler flue should have been. Beside it is a 9x13 Terra cotta liner installed on the wrong axis. It goes down through the smoke chamber and terminates right above the damper. Neither the sweep nor I can figure out wtf they were thinking.

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Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:16:53 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Gastard:


Yea . .you're talkin' about me . More the problem is the woodstove is mounted in front of the fireplace w/ the backvent plumbed up the flue through
a steel plate . The chimney is well built w/ an intact ceramic liner , but the chimney has so much mass it's difficult to get the chimney itself up to temp
w/out sweating us out of the house .
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Originally Posted By Gastard:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Gastard:
Originally Posted By BustinCaps:
Originally Posted By ZW17:
Also, get it cleaned if you burn solid fuels....

http://mavenrestoration.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chimney-fire-prevention.jpg



Meh. That costs money. The fire department is free.


So are the clothes from the Red Cross .


Small chimney fires (very small) are actually a healthy part of the lifecycle of your liner. Each day you should run your wood stove at full throttle for 15-30 minutes, it can cause small build ups to flame up for a few minutes and quickly burn off, then when you go to sweep the stuff that is left just flakes right off.

What is really scary is when people damper their stoves right down for weeks a time and a thick glaze of creosote builds up. That stuff is miserable to sweep out and can cause pure havoc if it lights up.


Yea . .you're talkin' about me . More the problem is the woodstove is mounted in front of the fireplace w/ the backvent plumbed up the flue through
a steel plate . The chimney is well built w/ an intact ceramic liner , but the chimney has so much mass it's difficult to get the chimney itself up to temp
w/out sweating us out of the house .


This problem will be 100% resolved by installing a properly sized and insulated stainless liner. Burn dry wood and voila!
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:18:51 PM EST
My chimney partially collapsed in the storm that caused all the flooding here in Colorado.

It is a 123 year old house/chimney, and it had never been maintained. I had it restored, and now both sections are lined, one with steel for the fireplace and one with aluminum for the water heater and boiler. Should be good to go for a while now.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:19:25 PM EST
If we are going to talk crazy people in this thread, I saw a genius run single wall galvanized pipe through an open window into a huge piece of galvanized culvert pipe acting as the "flue". Nice trim work around the window pass through, though.

Link Posted: 10/22/2013 4:21:58 PM EST
Mine is still loose from our last big earthquake. I fully expect it to fall over when we get our next big one.
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