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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/26/2002 12:24:46 PM EST
Tommytrauma brought this up in another thread. I thought I'd post this little gem:
Marianne is now 4 years old. Her parents were very excited when she turned four that perhaps that would mean the the terrible twos were finally over. They were not. Her parents are very grateful that the Grandparents are nearby. The grandparents are grateful that Marianne's aunts and uncles live nearby. Marianne's Aunt is grateful that this is her niece, not her daughter. Why? Marianne requires an incredible combination of strength, patience, and endurance. Marianne begins her day by getting up early and making noise. Her father unfortunately has mentioned how much this bothers him. So she turns on the TV, or if that has been mysteriously disconnected, bangs things around until her parents come out. Breakfast is the first battleground of the day. Marianne does not like what is being served once it is placed in front of her. She seems to be able to sense how hurried her parents are. When they are very rushed, she is more stubborn and might refuse it altogether. It would be a safe bet that she would tell her Mom that the toast tastes like poop. This gets her the first time out of the day.
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Time out! It get's her butt tanned! Oh, wait, I'd go to jail for that, wouldn't I?
In the mornings she goes to pre-school or goes off with her grandmother or over to her aunts. Otherwise Marianne's mother is unable to do anything. Marianne can not entertain herself for more than a few moments. She likes to spend her time purposefully annoying her mom, at least so it seems. Marianne will demand over and over that she wants something. For example, playdough. She knows it must be made first. So her mom finally gives in and makes it. Marianne plays with it about one minute and says, " Lets do something" . Her mother reminds her that they are doing something, the very thing that Marianne has been demanding for the last hour. " No, Lets do something else" So after Marianne's mother screamed so hard she was hoarse when her husband came home, Marianne gets to go out almost every morning. At preschool she is almost perfect, but will not ever do exactly what the teacher wants. Only once she had a tantrum there. Marianne gets along with the other children as long as she can tell them what to do.
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No pre-school for this little monster! Cont'd.
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 12:27:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/26/2002 12:28:51 PM EST by KBaker]
Cont'd
Her relatives wish that happened at their homes! Her grandmother and Aunt all follow the same time out plan. This means she goes to a certain room until she calms down. The room is empty now at Marianne's grandmother. Marianne broke the toys, and they were removed.
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Spank
She banged the furniture around and it was removed.
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Spank
What sets Marianne off is not getting to do what Marianne wants. She screams, tells people she hates them, and swings pretty hard for a four old.
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Spank
After a half hour it is usually over, but not always. Marianne will usually tell her mom or Grandmother about these tantrums. The story is always twisted a little. For example, Marianne will tell her Grandmother that her mom locked her in her room because she was watching TV. Her grandmother used to believe these stories, and Marianne could tell the whole story of how she was watching this show, and her mom just came in and dragged her to her room. Now it turns out that Grandma doesn't think much of TV anyways, and so this made a certain amount of sense to her. This led to more than one heated argument between the Grandma and her mom. Of course there was almost no truth to this at all. It took the tables being turned for the Grandma to really believe that her Granddaughter could set up an argument like this. Marianne came home and told her mom that Grandma let her eat four cookies and an ice cream cone for a treat and that she was very full. Marianne's mom doesn't think much of treats, and could see how this might happen and thought she would have to talk to her mom. Finally they both realized what Marianne was doing. Most of the afternoon with Marianne is spent chasing her around trying to wear her out. It doesn't seem to work, but it is worth a try. When she is at her aunts, she tries to wreck her cousins stuff. When is she good? When there are no other cousins around and she has the complete attention of her Aunt or Grandpa. Marianne loves the bedtime battle. She also loves to go to the Mall. But she never gets to go there or hardly anywhere else. She acts up so badly that her family is very embarrassed. Her mother shops and visits when Marianne goes to preschool. It is hard to know who is more excited about Marianne going to school next year, her mother or Marianne!
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That kid would learn the other uses of a belt or a switch. Corporal punishment [i]does[/i] have a place in child-rearing. This was from [url]www.klis.com/chandler/pamphlet/oddcd/about.htm[/url] Read the rest of it. Jesis!
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 12:41:29 PM EST
Oppositional defiant disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are both 'real' conditions. They are also both MASSIVELY overdiagnosed. it's very interesting how any poor behavior can now be classified as a 'condition' thereby relieving the individuial or the parents of any responsability. "No your honor, I'm not really a scumbag, I have an impulse control disorder that makes me steal cars". I really believe that the growing lack of personal responsability is the biggest problem we face as a society. Forgive the rant, it's been a long week.
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 12:48:07 PM EST
You know, I've seen this behavior before. The little girl was a first child and started having severe problems after a younger sibling came along. The root problem was that she went from being the center of attention to getting much less because of the baby. You know what fixed it? Lots of interaction with her parents, no TV, and stressing that she had to accept the fact that she was not the only child anymore. Oddly enough, it worked wonders. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 2:06:46 PM EST
I had one of these kids in my class the last 2 years I was a teacher. He was a 4th grader the first time I had to deal with him. I told him to go to the office and he said no. I ended up carrying him down there and got a couple of black and blue marks from him, His mother did not show up for his ard with the administrators and I was expected to put up with this bull shit in my class. After carrying him to the office a few more times he realized I would not put up with this behavior. I only had him once a week. The teachers who are still there tell me he does what he wants to and everyone trys to ignore him. I guess his mom will wise up when he gets his very own probation officer. Teachers have to put up with a lot. The administrators can not or will not do anything about it. We can not violate his special ed rights you know. I guess I am lucky I did not get sued. John, a former teacher.
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 2:19:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas: You know, I've seen this behavior before. The little girl was a first child and started having severe problems after a younger sibling came along. The root problem was that she went from being the center of attention to getting much less because of the baby. You know what fixed it? Lots of interaction with her parents, no TV, and stressing that she had to accept the fact that she was not the only child anymore. Oddly enough, it worked wonders. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
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AMEN! More face time and less TV time. It works for my kids.
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