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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/4/2005 9:00:03 PM EDT
If someone gets a bacclaureate degree from one of those online schools like Kennedy-Western or University of Phoenix, can they use that to get into law school or an MBA program at a regular university? Assuming they pass the LSAT, GMAT or whatever too?
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:20:50 PM EDT

That's such a variable thing. The quality of the school, the accrediting body, accrediting record...

It might not matter at all, it might only be a little issue, or it might get the application tossed without a second glance. I would say it probably depends a lot on what schools you apply to, who reads your application, etc.

Good standardized test scores and astronomical letters of reference should help a ton.

Jim
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:23:15 PM EDT
Hey Pete,

I would assume that if you receive your degree from an accredited university there would be no problem in continuing your education at a traditional school. I obtained my undergrad degree by taking a mix of online and traditional classes....the degree itself (the one hanging on the wall) looks exactly like what the folks that went the traditional route received. Looking at my transcripts, the only tip-off that some of the courses were online, professional study-type classes could be the accelerated time frames of the classes. I am now pursuing a graduate degree that is totally online from an accredited university (Southwestern College, KS). HTH
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:47:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By glockster96:
Hey Pete,

I would assume that if you receive your degree from an accredited university there would be no problem in continuing your education at a traditional school. I obtained my undergrad degree by taking a mix of online and traditional classes....the degree itself (the one hanging on the wall) looks exactly like what the folks that went the traditional route received. Looking at my transcripts, the only tip-off that some of the courses were online, professional study-type classes could be the accelerated time frames of the classes. I am now pursuing a graduate degree that is totally online from an accredited university (Southwestern College, KS). HTH



The accreditation thing is what's so iffy. I have heard that many acreditation agencies are bullshit, just arms of a particular online college, so the college can claim they are "accredited". After all, I could probably make some cash by starting the "PeteCO midwest accreditation league" and then accredit all sorts of schools offering degrees in lobster repair, medical billing, etc.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 7:33:27 AM EDT
Spending a little time researching your preferred school and it's accrediting body before you attend would be time well spent.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 7:59:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glockster96:
Spending a little time researching your preferred school and it's accrediting body before you attend would be time well spent.



Listen to this man, he's wise.

There was an article in the Wall Street Journal about online universities earlier this week, see if you can find it.

The moral of the story is that you want one that is PROPERLY accredited, and in the program you are using. Most 'online' universities are not. (IIRC, University of Phoenix is an exception.)

But most of these 'online' schools are BS, and nothing more than cash to get a certificate. Some are little better than mailing off for a diploma.

The real exceptions to that rule are the 'traditional' universities that have online courses. I'm getting my MBA right now, and One of my classes is 'online'. I view the lectures after the fact on the 'net, but other than that it's virtually the same as being there. (This is through Arizona State, BTW). I looked at one point at getting a Master's in Mech. Engineering from the University of Illinois - also online. These are the programs you want. They're real universities, not for-profit degree mills, and what you are basically doing is watching real class lectures without being there. And you are getting a universally accepted degree. A lot of schools offer at least classes this way, and some offer whole degree programs (like the U of I one I mentioned). But many offer them as a service to their part time students - my online class is taught while I'm at work. Take those classes.

In general, a degree will be worth more if it's from a public or not-for-profit university than a for-profit.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:02:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PeteCO:
If someone gets a bacclaureate degree from one of those online schools like Kennedy-Western or University of Phoenix, can they use that to get into law school or an MBA program at a regular university? Assuming they pass the LSAT, GMAT or whatever too?



There is an empifical answer to your question. Call some of the law-schools and MBA admissions offices in your area (or that your interested in) and ask how many people they have accepted from online BA programs (%).

As a professor, I would need the school to be accredited by the usual and customary organziations and, even then, I would be skeptical. But good grades, accreditation, letters of rec, and above average test scores would keep you in the running.



Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:07:07 AM EDT
For an opposing viewpoint... I HATE online degree programs. I borrowed money, went full time, and busted my ass to get through grad school, and enabling any dipshit with a computer who can fog the mirror enough to take the GRE to do it devalues those of us who put the time in in the classroom.

JMO, of course.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 6:40:41 PM EDT
Hey modog,

I think that if a person attends an accredited online university, the work, financial and time commitments are just as strenuous as those of a traditional school. As with most things, you will only get out of your education what you are willing to put in. Of course YMMV, and JMHO.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 6:43:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By glockster96:

As with most things, you will only get out of your education what you are willing to put in.




Education is like a septic tank that way.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:41:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 8:41:19 PM EDT by glockster96]

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By glockster96:

As with most things, you will only get out of your education what you are willing to put in.




Education is like a septic tank that way.



I don't care who you are, that right there is funny.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:57:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 8:59:46 PM EDT by KS_Physicist]
www.ope.ed.gov/accreditation/Search.asp

I searched for my school, and found it. Accredited, thankfully.

Then I searched for "University of Phoenix Online" and got no results, but then searched for "University of Phoenix" and found the "UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-ONLINE CAMPUS" listed, accredited with the North Central Association.

If you can find the school on that search, you have good assurance. If you can't...then you need to be asking questions before you enroll.

Jim
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