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Posted: 6/15/2009 10:22:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 5:05:02 PM EST by B_A_Bushmaster]
Hi guys,
I could use any advice you can give. I inherited some old rifles, one of witch is a Murata type 18 (Japanese). It’s an old black powder cartridge rifle and it hasn’t been cleaned since WWII? Has allot of grime and some rust (enough to exceed my current gun cleaning abilities). ––-Even bother messing with the stock? THANX ––B_A
http://i675.photobucket.com/albums/vv113/b_a_bushmaster/gun013.jpghttp://i675.photobucket.com/albums/vv113/b_a_bushmaster/gun012.jpghttp://i675.photobucket.com/albums/vv113/b_a_bushmaster/gun010.jpg
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:46:46 AM EST
Pics?

It'd help to see what kind of condition you're talking about.

Lots of different ways to clean an old gun. WD-40, cleaning oil, or a good penetrating oil with a toothbrush would be a good place to start.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:50:57 AM EST
Thanks again,
I'll post pics tonight when I get back home. Will Marvel mystery oil work?
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:51:22 AM EST
My own opinion is to lightly work on the rust with something a lot softer than the bluing on the steel - a green Scotchbrite pad, a brass brush or screen, etc. That rifle will never again be a shooter, so working on the bore is optional.

If I had it, and wanted to keep it, I would try to de-rust the finish and try to clean up the stock with Simple Green, 409, or even a solvent like paint thinner. After it was reasonably clean I would oil it up and either wall hang it or store it away. It's definitely not a shooter.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:39:44 PM EST
Maybe, since it is not a shooter anymore, it looks cooler like it is rather than clean and shiny? Its like when you drop a piece of bologna on the floor... do you clean it off and lose all the new flavor? No way.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:01:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dumpster_Baby:
My own opinion is to lightly work on the rust with something a lot softer than the bluing on the steel - a green Scotchbrite pad, a brass brush or screen, etc. That rifle will never again be a shooter, so working on the bore is optional.

If I had it, and wanted to keep it, I would try to de-rust the finish and try to clean up the stock with Simple Green, 409, or even a solvent like paint thinner. After it was reasonably clean I would oil it up and either wall hang it or store it away. It's definitely not a shooter.

Why couldn't you shoot it?

Granted, its probably an odd cartridge, and you'd probably play hell making brass for it, and working up a BP loading for it - but it could be done. I've got a friend with a Martini I'm dieing to shoot. He spent 3 months trying to figure out how to make brass for that thing, but he did, and it works.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:04:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:06:12 PM EST by surplusnut]
just lightly oil the metal parts and if there is any rust you can use 0000 steel wool with clp or kroil and get the rust off. If you want to shoot it you can make up your own ammo for it and i bet it would be a lot of fun to shoot. Murata's are fairly rare so don't alter anything on it. That is a very cool find.

If i were you i would leave the stock alone because if you intend to sell it later on and the stock has been refinished that will really hurt the value.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:09:49 PM EST
Found some info on the gun, its cartridge, and some info to get started making your own ammo for it: http://members.shaw.ca/ursacki/muratat18pix.htm
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