Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/29/2005 12:19:42 PM EDT
I've looked in the MLA handbook and at countless places online, but I can't find the answer to this.

How do I cite, in MLA format, an online full-text version of the Versailles treaty? Do I treat it as a simple web page, or as a government document, or what?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 12:20:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 12:24:15 PM EDT by jcp84]
I believe as a web page.

The author's name, date, date of publication on the site, and the web address. I might be missing some of it, though. It's just the format that most accurately matches that in your handbook if you have one.

ETA:

Author(s). Name of Page. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site. Date of Access <electronic address>.

From OWL at Purdue:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html#Electronic
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:48:11 PM EDT
Tag to top until Ma Danby gets home. She finished her MLS a few years ago and one of her comp papers was on citing Internet sources. She might have some good insight. As I recall one of the challenges of using internet cites is that they change. So you need to potentially have more information. Although the Treaty of Versailles can be found in a lot of places, more obscure documents might be located in only one location. Say a letter from Tom Jefferson to John Adams might be located at the U of VA Library. What happens if the UofVA library changes it's directory structure, sSay UVA.Library.collections.jefferson.letters.etc to UVA.edu.JeffersonLibrary.DigitalCollections.Jefferson.letters.etc somebody using your cite is screwed, it doesn't work anymore, yet the document hasn't changed and it's location is still the same.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:49:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jcp84:
I believe as a web page.

The author's name, date, date of publication on the site, and the web address. I might be missing some of it, though. It's just the format that most accurately matches that in your handbook if you have one.

ETA:

Author(s). Name of Page. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site. Date of Access <electronic address>.

From OWL at Purdue:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html#Electronic



this "ETA" content is correct.
Top Top