Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 8/28/2004 2:01:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 2:03:33 PM EST by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:05:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:10:27 PM EST
Dont know if you have any national forest near you...if it were me, I would take him out to the forest, find a really nice area that wont be developed in our lifetime, and let him rest there.
Not sure about the rules or laws regarding this, but if it were me, I wouldnt much care....I would just do it. Good luck with your choice, I know its a tough one.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:13:24 PM EST
Under a nice shady tree, on your property. lay him to rest. Sorry for your hardship.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:18:12 PM EST
I went through this earlier this year. As it ended up. My yellow lab is in a jar with her collar and tags hanging on it sitting on a shelf. I know you said you didn’t want an urn collection. But if you don’t bury your pup. What else can you do?

Hope his last days are good ones.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:18:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 2:20:03 PM EST by Mahatma8Rice]
Please don't take this wrong. Maybe it's time to put your dog down. With his kidneys failing, I don't think there are going to be any comfortable days for him. Also, one of the causes of kidney failure in dogs is a diet too high in protein.

I have had pets put down, and I have let pets die. Puting them down hurt me much more, but I know they hurt less in the long run.

I knew a man one time who had a dog. I didn't agree with this man on anything. But when his dog became terminally ill and in discomfort, he listened to the vet. The man took his dog home. He lovingly bathed it, dried it, brushed its coat and petted and talked to it. Then he took the dog back to the vet and held it while the drugs took effect. It took a very big man in my eyes to show that much love and respect for a pet.

Pampering your pet will make you feel better. I don't blame you one bit. I'm just older and have seen too much suffering. If your pet is suffering, keeping it alive won't ease its pain.

God be with you, brother. Love takes a toll on us many times.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:18:58 PM EST
First off, let me offer my sympathies. We have had a difficult time with one of our dogs lately, and the fear of losing him was overwhelming. I am grateful to hear that there are others like QS and I who value our dogs so much. With that said, perhaps ETH has the right idea. Burying him in a place where you have roots would be wonderful. If that option is not available, perhaps you should rethink cremation and wait until you get to a new place. I am not trying to be morbid, by my step-father died and was cremated last year and his remains were placed in a beautiful oak box that no one would associate with an urn. Or, if there was a favorite park that he loved, try a clandestine mission to bury him there. No matter what you do, just remember, it is how you treated him during his life that matters and that you were a good dog papa to want him to be laid to rest with respect.

ML
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:19:21 PM EST
You have to be careful about the cremation option also. The crematorys like to do mass cremations and then give everyone some ashes. The problem is that you are not getting your dogs ashes.

It costs more for a separate private cremation. The only way to know is to be present at the cremation.

I do a lot of work with greyhound rescue, and I have been exposed to the pitfalls of cremation on many ocassions.

I'm sorry about your buddy.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:20:38 PM EST

I'm not gonna do a pet cemetary. Down here they are ridiculously priced, too far away to visit and I'm positive they resell those plots in the future.



Ooh, dont tell Imbroglio that. He buried his pet dog in a cemetary.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:20:54 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:21:23 PM EST
Damn SA, sorry to hear.

CampyBob just lost his lab. Having lost lots of dogs myself to numerous ways- I can say it never gets easier to let a canine companion go. I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to do after they're gone. Usually we just bury em somewhere. Other times, there wasn't anything to bury. (Interstate)

I don't know what to tell you SA, it's apparent that you don't know yourself. But I would say that burying him in his favorite sunning spot is a suitable option IMHO. But perhaps the best would be to cremate and spread his ashes over his favorite spot.

It's easy to compare a canine companion to a human- they are man's best friend. So if I were in your shoes, I'd compare the circumstances to my own death. I won't be buried in my favorite spot- chances are I'll be either spread out somewhere after cremation or plunked down next to a whole field of corpses who's former inhabitant souls I wouldn't have cared to have known when I was alive. I'm fairly certain my wish will be to be cremated so my remains can be spread in a spot I feel suitable...

I certainly don't wish for any of my friends or family to tote my ashes around. I would want them to understand that our time is limited and all to often, short here. It's the journey ahead that's most important and we'll meet again. I can't imagine someone not wanting to let go... (Not necessarily addressing you circumstances here SA as your situation does have the added benefit of it being your choice in the end)

So if he were cremated, his body would return to the earth in his favorite spot. You could be at ease that he won't be dug up, and further- some of his ashes will be carried off into the wind to follow you. It'll be easy to see him everywhere when you pause to think of your memories.

I recently spread the ashes of an Aunt who lost her battle with cancer. Some were placed at her and her husband's cabin. They're favorite spot. It was a mountainous area in Wyoming and the views where spectacular. Some of her ashes were spread in the creek near the cabin to be carried further. She returned to the earth where she chose and I know that ashes to ashes and dust to dust is true. She's now everywhere when I think of her.

Hope your "buddy" goes quietly SA. Take care.

Sly
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:23:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 2:25:40 PM EST by EricTheHun]
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:23:22 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:27:19 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:33:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By MarianLibrarian:
First off, let me offer my sympathies. We have had a difficult time with one of our dogs lately, and the fear of losing him was overwhelming. I am grateful to hear that there are others like QS and I who value our dogs so much. With that said, perhaps ETH has the right idea. Burying him in a place where you have roots would be wonderful. If that option is not available, perhaps you should rethink cremation and wait until you get to a new place. I am not trying to be morbid, by my step-father died and was cremated last year and his remains were placed in a beautiful oak box that no one would associate with an urn. Or, if there was a favorite park that he loved, try a clandestine mission to bury him there. No matter what you do, just remember, it is how you treated him during his life that matters and that you were a good dog papa to want him to be laid to rest with respect.

ML




Right now that is looking like my best case scenario. I was just hoping someone had an idea I didn't consider yet.

My family does have property in Iowa but when my Grandmother goes her property will most surely be sold by her kids and when my Dad goes his wife and daughter will probably move. I wouldn't feel good putting him either place. I only wish I had my life a bit more squared away by this point.

Years ago I "thought" I was living in the place I would retire but Florida is changing so much (and not for the better) I don't want to stay.



Florida does suck...I'm absolutely positive that your puppy would be happier any place other than Florida, California or New York.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:36:22 PM EST
SA,

I wasn't suggesting that his diet had been poor. I was just expressing concern that a steak diet right now might cause him more kidney pain or uremic poisoning. It is obvious that you took good care of your dog.

I don't have a pet and don't have the courage to get another. The last pet I had was a ferret. He and I were buds. Compared to a good dog, ferrets are practically the most useless pet around. They can't be trained; they can't decide whether they are a mindless puppy or a mindless kitten; and they think that it is perfectly fine to get into everything. When he was put down, I held him in my lap and I wept. I know pets are wonderful, but I cannot take the death of something or someone dear to me again. I just don't have that strength in me.

God bless you.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:37:29 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:37:35 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:38:32 PM EST
After looking at all the ideas given SA, the only other option I see not mentioned is to keep him frozen until you move but that just don't seem right to me. Given the love you have for your dog I would probably have him cremated and then when you move to your new house bury the urn wrapped in his blanket there with a nice memorial marker.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:42:56 PM EST
Same thing happened to my dog. Got too old and her kidneys stopped working. She stopped eating lost a ton of weight, and just didn't get around.

I shot her in the head down by the river where we used to go camping (her favorite spot) and then we burned her right there and tossed the remains into the river.

Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:44:43 PM EST
I read your post thoroughly, this is just an idea from what I did with GG & Scooter (no relation to Scooter-the-Hun).

I had them both cremated when their respective turns came up. Thank God their passings were years apart or you could have buried me with them. They both used to like to play at a lake near where I lived for years when they were alive. I took both their cremains and scattered them on a hillside overlooking the lake where they liked to go to swim and play. Nobody noticed when I did it and nobody knows that they still romp the hill and lake but me.

God will guide you through this my friend, SteyrAug, they WILL be on the other side.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:45:22 PM EST
The only option is cremation due to the circumstances. What else can you do. Freezing is impractical. And if you bury him, youll have to move.

On the other hand, if you believe that his body is just that a body and his soul is gone, the body really doesnt matter that much. Its just a holder for his lifeforce until he moves on. Be confident that he will not suffer anymore and that he is in a happier place.

Dont envy your decision.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:47:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 2:48:35 PM EST by RiffRandall]
It might be a bit creepy but I recall reading of places that offer freeze-drying of deceased pets. Doesn't seem as disrespectfull as the taxidermy option.

I know the feeling. When my Husky passed on I about punched my dad out when he asked if I wanted to let the trash collector take her since I was living at a rental house. He realized his fauxpas right as he said it & offered to help bury her in my parents back yard but she was my dog & I was going to bury her.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:48:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 2:49:14 PM EST by PennvilleBill]

Originally Posted By Atencio:
After looking at all the ideas given SA, the only other option I see not mentioned is to keep him frozen until you move but that just don't seem right to me. Given the love you have for your dog I would probably have him cremated and then when you move to your new house bury the urn wrapped in his blanket there with a nice memorial marker.



This is a good solution.
And please don't take this wrong, but have you considered a taxidermist?
Just a thought..........
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:51:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By PennvilleBill:

Originally Posted By Atencio:
After looking at all the ideas given SA, the only other option I see not mentioned is to keep him frozen until you move but that just don't seem right to me. Given the love you have for your dog I would probably have him cremated and then when you move to your new house bury the urn wrapped in his blanket there with a nice memorial marker.



This is a good solution.
And please don't take this wrong, but have you considered a taxidermist?
Just a thought..........




you know how taxidermy (spelling? wtf?) works? the skin is stretched over a form that takes up the shape of the body. you'd still have the problem of how to honorably dispose of the innerds, and having your pet's hide stretched over a dummy and sitting in the TV room would just be creepy.

Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:56:02 PM EST
Sorry to hear about your impending loss, Styer. As some of you may remember, my wife and I recently lost Skipper, our little ball of fur and energy Corgi. He was our first dog (we've had cats for 15 years) and he didn't make it past his 1st birthday. The vet STILL doesn't know what killed him.

I hope this doesn't sound crass, cruel, or disgusting, but have you given any thought to . . . . . taxidermy? I know many here may consider this morbid, but if you and your wife could get over the initial aversion to it, it would actually solve your problems. You wouldn't have to bury him, or start an urn collection.

Again, I mean no disrespect and I hope I don't upset anyone with this idea - it is just a thought.

Now go give that buddy of yours a big hug and another tummy rub.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 2:59:34 PM EST
Man, thats to bad, I have been nursing my 15 yr. old dog for a while, it sucks she has been my best for all them years. Good luck to both of us.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:03:38 PM EST
I know how you feel, Steyr. Tough decisions. I had my dog die 2 years ago next month. I had him since I was 12 years old. He lived about 11 years. We buried him in the backyard in a blanket. We didn't put him to sleep, even though we knew he was dying. We just couldn't bring ourselves to do it. I know some people feel it is best, but how many of these same people would put down their own parents or son/daughter who was dying. Probably none.

Life is precious, suffering or not. A dog would suffer through fire and brimstone out of loyalty to his master. Every minute he has left in him he would rather spend with those who love him until the last ounce of life is used up, than be put down. IMO. Keep him with you and spend as much time as you have with him until he is ready to go.

Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:05:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 3:05:56 PM EST by Bailey]
I am sorry about your situation and really feel for you. We lost our great black Lab Cujo one year ago and decided to have him cremated. Our vet referred us to a wonderful facility; we took Cujo there and stayed during the procedure. The total cost was $175 including the nice box. If your dog is very special to you, you won't mind the cost.

Take solace in that we will hopefully see our pets again one day; I look forward to seeing Cujo. God bless you.

ps Click on my User Info button and you will see Cujo's picture.

Edited to correct spelling error.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:09:39 PM EST
i would do the cremation. it's probably the best way for you to hold off a burial until you find the right spot. this is what i plan to do when that time comes. i'll probably bring the ashes to a river or where i took her hunting and put them there.

if you want to bury your dog, make sure to dig a deep hole. i'm serious, you don't want some critter running around with your dogs leg in it's mouth.

i agree with Mahatma8Rice on the diet. protein is not a real important thing for dogs, especially dogs with kidney problems.

only you can decide when your dogs quality of life has reached a point of no return. i don't envy you at all. making that decision sucks. i worked at a vet clinic for a while and it was hard watching people break down everyday over losing their canine friends.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:17:08 PM EST
Steyr,
I am sorry to hear about your dog. They don't call dogs a "mans best friend" for nothing. Did your dog have a favorite park or place that you two enjoyed like a special hunting or fishing area? What about having him cremated and spreading his ashes in a place like this? I can also understand if you wish to keep his remains with you.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:30:50 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:34:13 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:37:13 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:40:58 PM EST
Steyr my sis was in the same situation this spring. They lost a pet they had for 21 years. They knew they were not going to be where they are forever. They went the cremation route. Casper is now sitting on a shelf awaiting his final resting spot. If this is the solution you chose. Ask if maybe they can cremate the blanket with him. If not, when you get to your fuure home, wrap the urn in the blanket before you lay him to rest.
I am sorry you have to go thru this. I know the feelings your having, he isn't just a dog, he is family. I wish you peace in your decision and peace for your buddy.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:48:20 PM EST
I'm sorry to hear about your buddy; that's a tough row to hoe. But once he passes away, the biological material that once carried him around is nothing but that: biological material. What you do with it is not a reflection of the time you shared together. What you do with the remains is solely for your own comfort; do whatever will comfort you most. I hope your last days together are pleasant.

Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:49:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 3:50:23 PM EST by Eric_Mayer]
I had to put my dog Grendel to sleep a few years ago. He was in so much pain that he was howling. The vet came to my house and I held him while the drugs took affect, I cried like a baby. Grendel heard me saying, "You're such a good boy" to him over and over like I had a 1000 times before, as he fell asleep.

Afterwards, I put in in a very large, heavy duty, Rubbermaid box and froze him. About 3 weeks later I drove through snow to bury him in the Eastern Sierras, on public land, 70 miles from a city. I check on his grave, adding lava rocks almost every time I'm up there.



(My fiance' painted the rock, it says, "Grendel, Such a good boy")

Anyways, my point is, if there is a place you go to alot that you are sure they will not develop in the future, why not place him in something that will allow no scent to escape and bury him there? I'm not sure if you have those types of places where you are, but it always warms my heart thinking about where he's at and that I can go see/talk to him anytime...

Good luck with everything, it is heart-breaking everytime I read about someone losing a dog.

EAM
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:52:22 PM EST
Having just buried two of my wife's cats in our backyard, I can say this is the best option. For my dogs, they'll be cremated SEPARATELY from any other dogs, and placed in an urn, or box of some kind. Then buried. We have very VERY rocky soil here in Austin (actually, we have about 8 inches of soil, then it's just limestone) so digging a hole big enough for an 80lb dog is not really possible without blasting . Cremation is the best option here. You can always just have it bagged and boxed, and then store it somewhere till you get a place where you're going to remain. Then, a quiet burial in the backyard in a pretty spot.

Sorry to hear about your pooch. Has your vet prescribed subcutaneous fluids to help with the kidneys? My wife's two cats died from renal failure, and we have a third that's going thru it now. Sub-q fluids are the norm for that kind of ailment. It's rough at first, but they get used to it. It IS rough watching them go downhill though.

Good luck with everything. Whatever you decide for your pooch is the right choice. Don't fret about it too much.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:06:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 4:24:48 PM EST by bulldog1967]
My condolences sir.

My wife and I also treat our dogs better than most people too.

He stayed true to you his whole life, and you are obviously doing your best during his last days,

Thats all any dog would ask of its leader.

__________________________________________

If You Can
(unknown author)
.
If you can start the day without caffeine,
If you can get going without pep pills
If you can always be cheerful, ignoring aches and pains,
If you can resist complaining, and boring people with your troubles,
If you can eat the same food everyday, and be grateful for it,
If you can understand when your loved ones are too busy to give you any time,
If you can overlook it when those you love take it out on you when,
through no fault of yours, something goes wrong,
If you can take criticism and blame without resentment,
If you can ignore a friend's limited education and never correct him,
If you can resist treating a rich friend better than a poor friend,
If you can face the world without lies and deceit,
If you can conquer tension without medical help,
If you can relax without liquor,
If you can sleep without the aid of drugs,
If you can say honestly that deep in your heart you have no
prejudice against, creed, color, religion or politics,
If you can give love unconditionally without pressure or expectation,
Then, my friend, you are almost as good as your dog.

__________________________________________________

The best friend a man has in this world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son and daughter that he had reared with loving care may become ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name, may become traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies away from him when he may need it most. Man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill considered action. The people who are prone to fall on their knees and do us honor when success is with us may be the first to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our head. The only absolutely unselfish friend a man may have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.

A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and poverty, in health and sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, when the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he can be near his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer, he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounter with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of a pauper as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert... he remains.

When riches take wings and reputations fall to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens. If fortune drives the master forth an outcast into the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him to guard him against danger, to fight against his enemies, and when the last scene of all comes, and death takes his master in its embrace and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by his grave side will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws and his eyes sad, but open in alert watchfulness, faithful and true even to death.



Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:07:34 PM EST
Shit a brick. Sorry Steyr.

I dont expect you to do anything with the BDU group buy. Fuck it. Spend the time with your mate.

Is there any possible way you can bury him in the place you are moving to? Perhaps get the current owner's permission somehow?
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:16:42 PM EST
Well, you could take him to a taxadermist, he'd always be with you after that. Though, I'd probably reserve that for something small like a cat.

Best option is cremation. Instead of an URN, you can have his ashes mixed with cement and a monument made. If you have a vet school or a good vet near by, there are a number of memorial options usually advertized in their offices.

I've buried a number of pets and I've had/got a bunch. It's always difficult but their memory lives on in photgraphs & stories. May your troubled heart find comfort in this difficult time.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:18:38 PM EST
I just lost a lab mix that I have had since '91 to kidney failure two weeks ago. I'm sorry to here you are going through the same thing. At least you will have some days to spend with him, whereas our dog passed quite suddenly

We chose to have her privately cremated (it was only $90) and will be taking her back to the UP of Michigan (where we got her out of a box in front of the mall while we were in college) to sprinkle her ashes in the Portage where she swam in her youth.

My thoughts are with you. Remember that all dogs go to heaven
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:27:24 PM EST
IF A DOG BE WELL REMEMBERED
(written by Ben Hur Lampman & published in the Sept. 11, 1925 issue of the Portland Oregonian)

We are thinking now of a dog, whose coat was flame in the sunshine and who, so far as we are aware, never entertained a mean or an unworthy thought. This dog is buried beneath a cherry tree, under four feet of garden loam, and at its proper season the cherry strews petals on the lawn of his grave. Beneath a cherry tree or an apple or any flowering shrub of the garden is an excellent place to bury a good dog. Beneath such trees, such shrubs, he slept in the drowsy summer or gnawed at a flavorous bone or lifted head to challenge some strange intruder. These are good places, in life or in death.

Yet it is small matter. For if a dog be well remembered, if sometimes he leaps through your dreams actual as in life, eyes kindling, laughing, begging, it matters not at all where the dog sleeps. On a hill where the wind is unrebuked and the trees roaring, or beside a stream he knew in puppyhood, or somewhere in the flatness of a pastureland where most exhilarating cattle graze. It is all one to the dog, and all one to you, and nothing is gained and nothing is lost -- if memory lives.

But there is one best place to bury a dog. If you bury him in this spot, he will come to you when you call -- come to you over the grim, dim frontiers of death, and down the well-remembered path, and to your side again. And though you call a dozen living dogs to heel they shall not growl at him, nor resent his coming, for he belongs there. People may scoff at you, who see no lightest blade of grass bent by his footfall, who hear no whimper, people who may never really have had a dog. Smile at them, for you shall know something that is hidden from them, and which is well worth knowing.

The one best place to bury a dog is in the heart of his master.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:29:46 PM EST
I'd cremate him and take the urn to your final place.
I still miss my childhood dog, had her from my birth til I was 14.....I understand how you feel.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:41:24 PM EST
You could always sprinkle his ashes over his favorite place......sorry for your bad news buddy...hang in there. We all have a meeting with the ground at some point in the future.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:12:18 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:02:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By SigZiggy:
I just lost a lab mix that I have had since '91 to kidney failure two weeks ago. I'm sorry to here you are going through the same thing. At least you will have some days to spend with him, whereas our dog passed quite suddenly

We chose to have her privately cremated (it was only $90) and will be taking her back to the UP of Michigan (where we got her out of a box in front of the mall while we were in college) to sprinkle her ashes in the Portage where she swam in her youth.

My thoughts are with you. Remember that all dogs go to heaven




Cremation and spreading the ashes over a favorite play area, river, beach etc. I think it's respectful and practical.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:32:01 PM EST


Bury him in your favorite state park. I know a guy whose dog died so him and his girlfriend went on a camping trip to their favorite spot and buried him there.

The last coon hound that I owned as a child died of old age and he was still such a gentle dog and still would wag his tail for me when I would spend time with him even though he couldn't stand up anymore. We would have to pick him up and move him to the porch in the mornings where he could lay in the sun. Give me a hard working dog any day over a companion dog. I still remember about a year before he died a bitch in heat came up to the house and Joe decided to knock him off a shot. My coon hunting buddy was their and we were laughing because when they tied up Joe tried to step over the bitch but couldn't get his leg over! We had to help him out and set his leg down for him so he wouldn't have to stand there on three legs!

I've seen men whom I considered some of the toughest that I've ever know cry like I child when they loose their pets.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:35:37 PM EST
Taxidermist and or freeze dry .
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:37:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 8:45:42 PM EST by thebeekeeper1]
<Content Removed.>
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:44:09 PM EST
Steyr, sorry to hear about your best buddy. I ask this with no disrespect intended. You live near an ocean don't you? Have you considered a Viking funeral?

AB
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top