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Posted: 12/30/2003 8:20:37 AM EDT
Alright, I've had plenty of the Simmons, BSA, etc...  (and I do have a couple Aimpoints, but I'm not talking about red dots)

Anyway, I really need to learn how to do "all things" as related to scopes.  I have a Tasco Super Sniper 10x42 Mildot.  I know, it's not a Leupold, but it's not a BSA either.  For most, it's a love-hate relationship - you either absolutely HATE them, or like them.  Getting past that (if you CAN'T get past it, just assume I have a Leupold), I bought 30mm Leupold rings for it.  

Whenever I go to the range with a new scoped rifle (my M14, my Rem 700, etc), I always seem to have to ask one of the range guys to zero it because I am so poor at doing it.

I have a cheap BSA boresighter that at least lets me get it on paper at 100 yrds without firing it, but from there, I'm lost (for the most part).  

Can anyone point me to a good primer for zeroing scopes like mine?

How about a good primer for using a mildot scope?
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:01:53 PM EDT
bolt gun

remove bolt
mount scope
look through barrel at 100 yard target
zero the bore on target
look through the scope
adjust crosshairs on target
test fire
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:16:18 PM EDT
I appreciate the reply.

Actually I was hoping to find info that was a little more in-depth regarding zeroing a scope - esp. once it's on paper, and then how to use the mildots.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:26:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 1:27:49 PM EDT by Da_Bunny]
I use an [s]Aimpoint[/s] Aimshot laser boresight. I wait until the sun goes down. I can hardly wait until they come out with a green (daylight) boresight.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:32:38 PM EDT
It depends on what kind of ammo/rifle/caliber youre using. For proper use of a MILDOT, a range-finder, quality ammunition (not perfect, but consistent loads. consistency is key), and chronograph are all importaint things to keep on hand.

Mil's are a standard measurement of bullet-drop. Let me illustrate:
[img]http://www.x-plane.org/users/eder/mildot1.jpg[/img]

With this load and muzzle velocity, the ranges marked above will coinside with your bullets trajectory.

MilDot's aren't for target shooting purpouses per se', but rather for times when you need consistent perciseon at varying ranges (Such as hunting, sniping, or saving the need to re-zero when changing ranges/shooting-distances while target shooting).
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:40:48 PM EDT
get a chrony, make up a good load, get the speed, use the jbm ballistic calculator, get the moa, minute of angle comeups for all ranges in 100 yard increments to 1100 yards, shoot for a bullet speed of 1675 or so, and use the comeups, use the mildot to range the target, and adjust for the comeups by using the elevation turret, you will soon memorise the comeups for your particular rifle, lemme know if you need help, i shoot past half mile regularly, i can even make the comeup charts and mildot stuff for you, also,get a mildot master, this will help you find range
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:42:24 PM EDT
ps, your scope will work fine
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:57:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Andreuha:
It depends on what kind of ammo/rifle/caliber youre using. For proper use of a MILDOT, a range-finder, quality ammunition (not perfect, but consistent loads. consistency is key), and chronograph are all importaint things to keep on hand.

Mil's are a standard measurement of bullet-drop. Let me illustrate:
[url]http://www.x-plane.org/users/eder/mildot1.jpg[/url]

With this load and muzzle velocity, the ranges marked above will coinside with your bullets trajectory.

MilDot's aren't for target shooting purpouses per se', but rather for times when you need consistent perciseon at varying ranges (Such as hunting, sniping, or saving the need to re-zero when changing ranges/shooting-distances while target shooting).
View Quote


Thanks.

The scope will be on a Remington 700 PSS in .308, which I'd like to have zeroed for 200 yards.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 2:24:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jtb33:
.....
Thanks.

The scope will be on a Remington 700 PSS in .308, which I'd like to have zeroed for 200 yards.
View Quote


For a remmy in .308, there should be tons of different load information and bullet-drop tables all over the net.


Speaking of which, anyone know if 'Mil-Dot Master' is any good?
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:42:56 PM EDT
I always start at 25 yards, get the windage on and elevation an inch or two high.  Then move on to 100 or 200 yards, or whatever.  This works well with non-bolt guns, since there is no convenient way to sight down the bore with, say, an AR or M1A.  Works well with a bolt gun, too.
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