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Posted: 9/4/2005 4:24:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/27/2005 11:49:47 AM EDT by efxguy]
My 10 year old yello lab, Buckaroo, has some kind of "event" yesterday and can no longer walk. I took him to the vet and they think he had a stroke or a tumor in his spine. The vet told me that there could be treatment and the cost would be between two to five thousand. The also offered the "alternative" and gave me few minutes to think about it. Maybe I'm weak, but I couldn't put him down just like that. him
I stayed up with him last night and he did not move at all. Just panted. He is not in pain, but just uncomfortable. But he is not even wagging his tail now, like he did at the hospital for all the nurses and doctors.

I rolled him over on his bed and he seems more comfortable and is in fact sleeping and dreaming. I hope is dreaming of grassy fields and cool lakes.

efxguy


UPDATE

I found this on the web. Maybe I'm hoping against reason: http://www.peoriahs.org/vestibular.html

We wagged his tail for my wife when she came downstairs, but couldn't raise his head though he tried.


Sunday afternoon.

Again, thanks for the outpouring of concern and sympathy. We (the wife and I) just returned from the
emergency vet in Aurora, IL. When we went to the crate he was in after the exam he was happy to see us and smiled and wagged his tail. It broke my heart to leave him there and when we walked away from the crate he was resting in, he tried VERY hard to get up and follow. He could barely raise his head. He
I guess I wanted to give him a fighting chance and not give up until I knew what he was up against. They think that he may need surgury, though if it is cancer (likely in labs) I'll have to do the right thing tomorrow.

If I had to, I wonder if I could put him to sleep here at home? It seems a damn shame to do it in a strange place where he is trembling and scared. At least he could be in the back acre where he roamed.

SUNDAY NIGHT UPDATE

We've just heard from the hospital tonight and it is a mixed bag. On the good news side, there is no cancer or spinal "stroke. On the other side, he has a herniated disc. This means that some of the disc material is pressing on his spine. I spent some time on the phone with the surgeon a few minutes ago and we both agreed taht this is his best shot at surviving this and having some kind of "normal" life afterwards. I feel we OWE it ito the Buckaroo. It was explaianed to me that this is a risky procedure. There is a risk of hemmorage, paralisis or just death from the surgury. On the other hand, the surgeon feels that left untreated, this would be fatal by itself. So there it is. Put him to sleep now, or give him his shot. I say go for it.

As any dog owner knows, a dog gives you his all. Unconditional love. So as a part of this deal, the owner MUST be able to make the hard decsions towards the last years of the dogs life. End the suffering if that is the right thing to do, or continue the fight if the odds are right. Anyone who has a companion animal or pet knows this in his heart, though many choose not to admit it. That is the deal.

If things do not go well, I have decided to take my wife and my other lab to the hospital and carry Buck outside. There is a stream and a meadow out back of the hospital. We will all spend some time there first, then I will be holding him when they give him his last shot. Then I know he will be dreaming of green meadows and cool waters as he slips away.

Of course I really hope that he has a good surgeon and pulls though and has an easy recovery and rehab. But I am a realist and know it is a long shot. They will be calling me at some late hour this morning when they are done with the procedure.

I feel better knowing now that we are doing all we can afford to do. There is comfort and consolation there.

Again, thanks. If anyone has a spot to host some photos send me an email and I'll put up a few shots of the Buckaroo and us.

Goodnight,

MONDAY MORNING UPDATE

Well we got some good and bad news last night, but we know that what ever the outcome, we did our best. I feel good about that.

It seems that the Buckaroo had a hernaited disc in his neck that was pressing on his spinal nerves. This was causing him much pain, though we couldn't tell as he is a pretty stoic dog. The surgeon called us around midnight to tell us that they removed the material that was affecting his nerves and that they felt certain that this was cause of his paralisys. But he was having seizures from the contrast dye they used for the CT scans. He had three of them and they were able to suppress them with Valium. We don't know what the seizures have done to him though the techs there feel that they will not reoccur.

So they told me at 7am that Buck is groggy but moving around. They will try to get him on his feet later this morning after the surgeon does his morning rounds. The Valium is keeping him from being fully alert. We are expecting more news after nine am.

I am pretty impressed with the VCA animal hospital in Aurora. They are expensive (5k so far...) but they know their stuff, they move fast and they share information. The three hours we spent in their waiting room yesterday was heart wrenching. Sinced they are an emergency hospital they are dealing with animals that are brought in in the most desparate conditions and many do not survive. We saw so many people rush their dogs in and then leave crying. How the vets, techs and intake staff witness this all the time and not go over the edge I will never know. A BIG THANKS TO ALL THAT CARE FOR OUR LOVED ONES, FOUR LEGGED OR TWO!her
Sincere thanks to all

efxguy

http://www.digitallives.com/efxguy/Made%20in%20a%20shade.jpg


MONDAY EVENING UPDATE

I've added a few photos further dwn the thread. All the photos are from our vacation in Michigan's Upper Peninnsula this past July 4th.

We visited the animal hospital this evening. I repeat that those folks see too much there. We had to wait as a dog patient was "coding" in the back area. Keep THOSE folks at the hospital in your thoughts and prayers!

We visited with Buck in his kennel there and he was a mess. Not dirty, just drugged mostly out of his mind. His eyes were looking in two different directions. This is a good thing judging by the sutures on his neck. He was shaved all the way around his neck. He recognized us once we started talking to him and got close enough for him to smell us. Then he moved his tail a bit and his every breath came out a a whine. We spent twenty minutes talking to him and petting him trying not to kneel on his IV lines or touching his sutures. We also brought him the fleece "bearskin" cover from his bed and put it under his head. He was whining so much it broke our hearts. THe vet said tha he had eaten a few bites of food and that he passes some urine. She was not sure if he passed it on his own or if he was expressed. In any case both of these things are good signs.

Sadly, we still do not know if he will pull through. There is no way to know yet if he has any control over his legs or can walk yet. He began to seizure after the surgury from what the vet assumes was the effects from the contrast dye from the CT scan. And he was having seizures all day. They have him on Valium to stop these event so there is no way to tell how the successful the surgury is yet.

So the old Buckaroo is still not out of the woods yet. We know that things will go badly for him and us if the surgury did not relieve his spine either enough or in time.

Frankly, I'm beginning to get shell shocked living with the uncertainty. My wife is feeling the same way. When we left Buck he again tried to get up to follow. It was hard to see, but not as hard as it was last night.

Good night all,

TUESDAY MORNING UPDATE

I subbed out of a job I had this week in order to be able to take action as needed. Thanks to the owner of TheSadMachine for covering me. Big thanks bro'.

According ot the vet I spoke to this morning, Buckaroo is off of the Valium and shows no more signs of siezures. He is less groggy and more alert. That's good news. He is eating some more and drinking if given water and passing urine. Also good news. But he is showing no signs yet of being able to move his legs. The techs tried to take him outside to see how he was doing and he was not able to hold himself up. So it is unclear now if he needs more time or if some thing more permanent happened. The vet says that some dogs would be walking by now, but some take more time. I'm hanging my hat on the "taking more time" part. So we really have no news yet. This is getting hard now as I am beginnig to have some self doubts if we did the right thing. I know in my heart that I needed to give him a chance, but it rips me up to think that he endured this surgury and time in the ICU for no reason. hope
TUESDAY EVENING UPDATE. NOT GETTING BETTER....

My wife just got back from visitng Buckaroo at the vet's tonight. She felt that Buck was very happy to see her and gave her kisses and tried to get to laying up. He could not of course do so. He did not wag his tail either. He was eating and drinking if he was helped to the dish. There have been no more siezures as well. As she walked into the house my phone rang and it was the surgeon who had just missed my wife and had examined Buck. The vet was not optomisitc. He said that he expected some signs of recovery with in 48 hours of the surgury, but he saw no evidence of Buck being able to use his legs. I kept trying to get the vet to tell me the point of his call and exactly what he was trying to say, as he repeated the he was not yet ready to "send up a flag" or "panic" yet. But he would not speculate on the next step. He kept warning me how hard it is to care for a dog of Buck's size and how it takes two techs to carry him outside to have his urine expressed. Buck still can not urinate on his own. I think he was trying to get me to either; end the whole thing, or to get me to realize what small chance there is for Buck to recover. him
WEDNESDAY MID DAY UPDATE

There is one thing I want to tell everyone today: VISIT THE SICK. It is amazing what personal contact can do, I've seen it myself today. I arrived at the hospital this morning as early as possible, yet after rounds and shift change and after a short wait was taken to the doggie ICU to see Buckaroo. To say that my heart broke to see him just laying there would be an understatement. He was just like I had left him the day before yesterday, laying on his side and not moving. He did not even wag his tail when he saw me. I had brought his lease and hisfavorite stuffed bear with me and I showed him these things and asked him if he wanted togo for a walk. At this he wagged the tip of his tail. I got down on the ground with him and began talking to him in a matter of fact way, asking him if he wanted to go outside, if he needed to "go" all the while stroking his head and ears and moving his limbs through his range of motion and massaging his joints.
After awhile of this one of the nurses came by and I started talking to her about Buck and what care he was getting. I rolled Buck onto his belly and got his stuffed bear tucked under his chin. This is his favorite postion for watching the world go by. I kept talking to nurse and after a short while, Buck tried to adjsut his positon and raised his head a little. I was still sititing on the ground by his side when the nurse asked me if I wanted to feed him. She brought out some of his special bland diet, a soft dog food mixed with white rice and formed into "meat" balls. These he ate from my hand with enthusiasm. I held the dish up high in front of him so he would lift his head to lick the bowl. After a short while of me sitting with him and continuing the physical therapy, the doctor came by to visit with us. After a moment or two Buck kicked his back legs and raised his head on his own! The vet and I agreed that this was some improvement! The vet on duty this morning is a wonderfull young woman from Mississippi who clearly cares alot about the patients under her care. She was the doctor who checked us in on Sunday. I aksed her if we could take Buck outside and she pulled out sling that she had made the day before. It was made from tape, gauze and some straps and was in the shape of a large figure 8. One of each of his rear legs went into the holes of the 8 and the loops were long enough to grab from above Buck like the handles of a large basket. She also had a large sling that went under his chest that also had straps that could be held from above. So we picked him up and carried him outside. On the way she commented several times that Buck was trying to take steps on his own! It was s long walk to the grassy area outside so when we got there we had to set him down. As soon as we got on the grass, Buck urinated on his own. Another great sign! SO we set Buck on his belly again and he held up his head and took a good look around. And while the doc and I continued talking, he moved his back legs around again to get more comfortable and kept looking around. She was very impressed by the amount of change from last night to today. Frankly, so was I . And very glad for it too. So it seems that all the postive emotional support, thoughts and prayers from both friends here and total and complete strangers of this board (!) is making a difference. That and some personal attention. It has been said that a dog would lay down its life for his owner, clearly that is true. As true as the fact that a dog will hang onto its life for his owner as well.

I feel much better about this now than I did last night. My wife will visit him on her way home from work tonight, hopefully Buck will have some energy left to show off for her too.

THURSDAY PM UPDATE

Well, it has been a long day for all of us. I arrived at the animal hospital around ten AM and Buck was laying in his kennel there and was looking pretty sorry for himself. He did not raise his head and did not wag his tail. He had a bowl of his regular kibble and one of the special "meatballs" that they give him there. The nurse said that he would not eat for her. He had urinated on himself recently. I sat down in the the kennel with him and began to talk to him and pet him and I wiped the weepy goop from his eyes. This seemed to cheer him a bit and in a short while I was able to get him to eat the kibble one piece at a time. I was joined shortly by the wonderful doctor there and as we both sat in the kennel with Buck he seemed happy to see her. I commented on this and she surmised it was because she has red hair like my wife's. I knew better than that, he likes her because she cares. We harnessed the Buckaroo up and began out trip outside. The doctor was very happy to see Buck trying to take steps with his back legs and I was glad to see that he was bearing weight with his left front leg. He was still not using his right front leg much or his right rear. But boy, was he happy to get outside, his face lit up once we opened the door. We got him onto the grass and set him on his side and again, began with some physical threrapy. No sooner had we started to move his back legs around than he began to move his bowels. And move, and then move them some more. It was comical in a way as I was trying to move his rear end away from his poop and he just kept making more. The vet and I were both laughing and once Buck finished, his face lit up in one of his doggy smiles. (See the photo of the three of us in the water for a look at him smiling.) He also urinated on his own. The doc was kind enought to clean up after him and bring out some spray "shampoo" cleaner and a towel and I cleaned up the old man as well as I could.

So what i learned there today is that the boy needs to come home. He needs a familiar (as in family) place to rest. He needs to be taken out to do his business. He needs the company of his family. They have done all that they can for him at the hospital, and the rest is up to him. I will try to get them to release him to me tomorrow or Saturday. I have been looking into some kind of doggie wheelchair or cart. I've been getting harnesses and piddle pads. I've set up his othopaedic bed near the window. I think that this will be his bet bet for recovery. I think also that alot depends on his mood and it will only improve at home.

It will be a long row to hoe as it were. We will both be taking time away from work. Not so big a deal for me as I am self imployed, but my wife has a limited amount of vacation. And I HAVE to take a job out of town for a few days next week. We are lucky to have a dog sitter that loves our dogs and is more than willing to come over and help move the ol' Buckaroo around. It really is a two person job. Wish us luck.

One last thing: As we were walking Buck back to his kennel at the hospital, all the female nurses and doctors lines up along the route and cheered Buck! I commented to the doctor on this and she said that all the ladies there loved the Buckaroo. I told her that the Buckaroo likes the ladies! I wonder where he got that from? he
We loaded him up and took the hour drive home. Our pet sitter was able to meet us at home and boy, was Buck glad to see her! It was the first time he wagged his tail all day. Our black lab, Sharkey greeted Buck by running around and licking Buck on the muzzle. So as expected it was a joyous homecoming. We set up a bed for the Buckaroo in the living room so that he could see the doors and be in the middle of things. I expect a repeat when my wife gets home tonight.

http://show.imagehosting.us/show/653218/0/nouser_653/T0_-1_653218.jpg
I think he has lost a lot of weight.

Now the work begins for us. Buck is a hundred pound plus dog and is as limp as a dish rag. You may be thinking, a hundred pounds, that's not so bad. And it's not, for a sack of concrete or something else you can manhandle and toss up on your shoulder. But moving the Buckaroo with a sling under his chest and around his rear legs and trying not to hurt him or run his head into a door way is tough. I've taken him outside a few times already and I break a sweat! We are lucky that we can walk out from our living room and not go up the front stairs, otherwise, I don't think I could manage on my own. I worry for my wife next week while I'm away. I can't avoid this trip and I feel pretty guilty about it. But life must go on and money must be made, so wish her luck and strenght,. She'll need it. Thankfully, his sitter is able to help out. Thanks Pampered Pets!

WEEKEND UPDATE........TWO WEEKS SINCE THE SURGURY..........

I went to Dallas and back and my wife and Buckaroo did just fine while I was gone. She was able to get the old man out the back door on the little backboard / sled / cart device I made for her and was also able to get few days away from work. The two of them had nice time alone together.

On Saturday morning, we were outside working on our construction project and the Buckaroo was sleeping on the lawn when our neighbor, the retired veterinarian, came by to visit and offer helpful hints on our construction,. Well the Buckaroo saw his pal come up the drive and he really tried to get to his feet, and with a little help he made it! Buck greets everyone who comes to the house and he takes this job seriously. We were all stunned and elated to seehim get up. He is also rolling over on his bed and with the help of a sling under his belly and rear end, is able to walk.He still "knuckles" his two right paws and he still needs me to walk on his right so that he may lean on my legs and not fall over but the slings keep his weight on his legs managable for him.

Until this morning, we would help / carry him outside and lay him on his side until he decided to "do his business. This morning, we went ouside and layed him down, after a moment he struggled to his feet, again with some help from his belly band, raced across the lawn to his favorite spot and had himself a good squat! So now he has regained some measure of his doggy dignity. Funny what motivates a dog.

So we are seeing some small progress every day. And though there is still a way to go, we are hoping for a recovery. H
Well imagine our surpise last night when we went to feed our dogs and the Buckaroo picked up his dish and walked over to his feeding area!

http://www.digitallives.com/efxguy/buckdish1.jpg

OK so the photo is pretty crummy, but I was not really thinking abou thte camera right then!

He plopped himself down and dropped his dish expecting it to be filled! Just like his old self. My wife was crying tears of happiness and my eyes were wet too....

http://www.digitallives.com/efxguy/buckdish2.jpg

It has been a long month for us all. There we several times that we were ready to give up on the old man, this proves that our faith in him was well founded! A BIG thanks to everyone who encouraged us when we were down and gave us advice when we were feeling lost.

We are pretty confident a this point to say this is a happy ending!

Sincerely

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:29:01 AM EDT
Damn, it's sad but give him a few days. He's not in pain right now so it wont hurt anything. You might have to give extra care and clean up after him but it's worth a bit of effort for an old friend. I hope he recovers.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:30:23 AM EDT
Dam.....sorry to hear that.

I too have dogs and dread the day something happens...
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:32:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:36:31 AM EDT
please see what happens after a few days...................... he is as confused as you are. Putting down an animal of any sort is something that will haunt you for a long time.......... even more so a fellow partner.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:46:01 AM EDT
Another +1 for waiting a few days. Make sure he eats and drinks. It could be something temporary ...
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:50:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 5:06:20 AM EDT by MK4Mod0]
My dog had a stroke also one time.............we gave him prednezon[sp]...and he was ok for another year before we had to pout him down...........It is sad I had him 13 yrs when he had the stroke.......it is sad and I hops for the best for you
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:53:28 AM EDT
I feel for you bud.... Give hime some time and some extra TLC, he'd do the same for you.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:04:45 AM EDT
Sounds like he's been a good companion for you.

He'll let you know when it's time.

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:40:24 AM EDT
Give it some time and see how it goes. I have a St. Bernard with bad arthritis and cancer. She's a bit slow, but she's still happy being at home with her family. Give it some time and see how it goes.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:47:48 AM EDT
Poor doggie!
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:49:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By efxguy:
My 10 year old yello lab, Buckaroo, has some kind of "event" yesterday and can no longer walk. I took him to the vet and they think he had a stroke or a tumor in his spine. The vet told me that there could be treatment and the cost would be between two to five thousand. The also offered the "alternative" and gave me few minutes to think about it. Maybe I'm weak, but I couldn't put him down just like that.

I took him home and visited with my neighbor, a long retired veterinarian that actually founded the hospital I was at earlier. His sympathy and advice was very welcome. He said dogs sometimes recover, mostly or partially and if it was his dog he would just wait and see for a few days.

I stayed up with him last night and he did not move at all. Just panted. He is not in pain, but just uncomfortable. But he is not even wagging his tail now, like he did at the hospital for all the nurses and doctors.

I rolled him over on his bed and he seems more comfortable and is in fact sleeping and dreaming. I hope is dreaming of grassy fields and cool lakes.

efxguy



He is....take comfort in that, give the boy a couple of days, you'll know when it's time...he'll let you know.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:15:40 AM EDT
My wife is an ER vet, and this is what she suggested:

Most likely the problem is either FCE (more likely) or a slipped disk, and a stroke is unlikely.

For more information on FCE (Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy), look at
www.petplace.com/Articles/artShow.asp?artID=3868&q=FCE.

If it's a slipped disk, then it probably won't get better by itself, without surgery. Get your vet to refer you to a veterinary referral hospital, which has specialists (surgeon or nurologist) who can diagnose the problem with certainty.

Is the dog urinating? If not, you will have to express the bladder until the dog recovers. This is very important.

If it is FCE, the dog should get better eventually, but he should be on steroids to prevent oxidative damage. If he is on steroids, he also needs to take Zantac or Pepsid.

Please feel free to shoot me an email if you have any questions.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:05:46 AM EDT
RubberDuck,

I have questions for you, but your IM is turned off! IM me with your contact info so I can reach you!

Many thanks

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:07:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RubberDuck:
My wife is an ER vet, and this is what she suggested:

Most likely the problem is either FCE (more likely) or a slipped disk, and a stroke is unlikely.

For more information on FCE (Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy), look at
www.petplace.com/Articles/artShow.asp?artID=3868&q=FCE.

If it's a slipped disk, then it probably won't get better by itself, without surgery. Get your vet to refer you to a veterinary referral hospital, which has specialists (surgeon or nurologist) who can diagnose the problem with certainty.

Is the dog urinating? If not, you will have to express the bladder until the dog recovers. This is very important.

If it is FCE, the dog should get better eventually, but he should be on steroids to prevent oxidative damage. If he is on steroids, he also needs to take Zantac or Pepsid.

Please feel free to shoot me an email if you have any questions.



Rubber Duck


I am touched by your offer of info and support. FCE sounds as likely as anything else. He has lost control of three of his legs. Both rear and one front. He cannot rise to his feet nor support himself once helped up. He is not incontinent and responds in all four feet to a prick test. He does not roll his eyes or have uncontrolled eye movement. His pupils are reactive and equal. He can and will wag his tail. He will eat from our hands and drink from a water bottle. He is breathing in short pants. We have carried him outside and he has just had a bowel movement while laying down, but he has not voided his bladder.

I hope that the vet has not missed the chance for corticosteroids yesterday.

What other advice do you have? How do I express his bladder?

Again, thank you so much for reaching out to us.


efxguy
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:06:49 AM EDT
Email me.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:43:09 AM EDT
Email sent.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:01:22 AM EDT
Update on old yaller?
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:52:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By efxguy:
I stayed up with him last night and he did not move at all. Just panted. He is not in pain, but just uncomfortable. But he is not even wagging his tail now, like he did at the hospital for all the nurses and doctors.

I found this on the web. Maybe I'm hoping against reason: http://www.peoriahs.org/vestibular.html

We wagged his tail for my wife when she came downstairs, but couldn't raise his head though he tried.



Our 13 yr old Golden Retriever had that. One day he started almost walking sideways.. within a few hours he would just fall over and eventually he couldn't get up at all. His eyes were twitching back and forth and panting like he couldn't cool down. Scared the hell out of us. We took him to a emergency animal hospital, and the first guy to see him was a dog neurosurgeon. He said right away that it was "old dog syndrome" or vestibular disease. He said that it could last a few days to months. They pumped him full of fluids via IV's, drew some blood, and did some quick xrays. They wanted to keep him over night, we instisted on taking him home.

We took him home that night, and my fiance being a nursing student, administered more IV's for him. Bought a bunch of those puppy training pads for the pee'ing. We laid down some plastic on the floor, put his bed next to the couch and some of the pads on top of that. We slept down there with him for 6 nights. He had noticable improvement by the 3rd day. By the 8th day he was up running around for short distances, and even made it up two sets of stairs.

The vestibular disease takes away their ability to sense what orientation they are. Everytime we picked him up to move him, he would flip out and flail around until we put him back down. If you can, find a pet neurosurgeon, and see if its possible that your dog does in fact have that.

-d
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:57:29 AM EDT
Its like losing a member of the family. I hope things work out for the best but you have to figure the poor guys is suffering.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 11:15:39 AM EDT
They are family, prayers that he's able to get well. God bless.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 12:54:47 PM EDT
Posting an update above.

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:12:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 1:13:18 PM EDT by rasanders22]
Makeing these kind of decisions is very hard. A while back I had to spend almost 2 grand on my black lab Ares because he had pancreitis (sp?) I knew i didnt have a choice to not spend it.

My parents dog got sick with blot one time. They originally quoted them 20,000 dollars. My mom asked my dad if he was willing to pay that much. And to my moms suprise, he said they didnt have a choice.

ETA: It only wound up costing them 2k
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:46:18 PM EDT
Sorry to hear your buddy is doing poorly. Hoping and praying for the best outcome. Best of luck, thoughts are w/you and yours.

Plese update as time permits.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:49:06 PM EDT
I hope that it does not end up being cancer.

As far as your question about the possibly putting him to sleep at home, if it comes to that: The solution they use for this purpose is not something vets send home (although you can always ask), so one option would be for you to take him home, give him a sedative from the vet, and then have the vet come out to actually put him to sleep.

We had one of our dogs die of lymphoma, and although it was almost a year ago, I still think about him every day.

Along with the sad stories, my wife sometimes encounters animals that recover almost unexplainedly, so there is often hope. I wish your dog the best.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:51:16 PM EDT
I'm so sorry to hear about your boy. Give him a pat for me your next visit. I hope he pulls out of this. Patty
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:56:15 PM EDT


My prayers are with you and your buddy. May it not be something serious.

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:04:44 PM EDT
I had to put two dogs down withen months a few years back. Got both as pups 12 years before, and both went downhill at the same time time. The vet wanted me to wait outside, but I wouldn't hear of it. I just held them, and they were happy as they got their shots. They left the world being held and petted by the person they loved. I should go that way.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:04:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:35:31 PM EDT
There is a disease that affects dogs, which mimics the effects of a stroke. It happened to my dog. She was paralyzed on one side and appeared to have suffered a stroke. Go Google "dog stroke" and you'll find out what I'm talking about. My dog fully recovered and lived a happy life until my wife ran over her on her way to work one day Hopefully your dog will make a full recovery. Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:51:02 PM EDT
My husky had a spinal stroke when he was about 11. We tried the steroid treatment. There was another one that cost about $2k, but after talking to the specialist, he said it was not the best route. We, he could move his back legs at all, read couldn't/wouldn't move. So we had to clean up after him all the time, which caused a skin condition due to the urine. He developed bed sores even though we flipped him all the time. He lasted 2.5 weeks and then slipped away, most likely due to congestive heart failure due to the inactivity.

The vet felt that he could walk with the use of a doggie wheel chair. But. that wasn't my dog. The vet was coming to put him down on a Monday and he decided that Saturday was better for him. I was a painful experience.

I hope it works out better for you and the dog. Good luck and prayers sent.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:24:10 PM EDT
Words cannot express my thanks for the outpourings of thoughts and prayers.

A sincere thanks to all my friends at arfcom.

It will be a tough night here at home for us and my other lab, a black named Sharkey who seems anxious and confused wondering where HIS best pal went....

Call me a sissy if you must, but I can't hold back tears every time I read this thread.

efxguy

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:54:44 PM EDT
Glad to hear that he is getting some specialized care. We do the darnest things for our pets.



That is 13 yr old golden retriever, as we are giving him IV's at home. The light stand made a great IV holder. Spent many nights on that couch.

-d
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:56:57 PM EDT
Words cannot express my thanks for the outpourings of thoughts and prayers.

A sincere thanks to all my friends at arfcom.

It will be a tough night here at home for us and my other lab, a black named Sharkey who seems anxious and confused wondering where HIS best pal went....

Call me a sissy if you must, but I can't hold back tears every time I read this thread.

efxguy




No real man or woman on this board thinks your a sissy. Best of luck.

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:21:05 PM EDT
Sunday night update at the top of the thread.

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:21:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By efxguy:
Words cannot express my thanks for the outpourings of thoughts and prayers.

A sincere thanks to all my friends at arfcom.

It will be a tough night here at home for us and my other lab, a black named Sharkey who seems anxious and confused wondering where HIS best pal went....

Call me a sissy if you must, but I can't hold back tears every time I read this thread.

efxguy




Then call me a sissy for loving my family members.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:30:26 PM EDT
My first yellow lab had the same thing happen. She was very athletic and ran with me 3x per week. One night I was letting her outside to go potty and she got up (age 11 or so and very very fit) and just fell down and then could only crawl in circles. Turned out to be vestibular syndrome/stroke. She was back to normal in about 2 hours. Then, it happened again about 6 months later. This time it took a couple of days to go away. After that though her mood was never the same. She became very cranky and even hostile at times. She lived another 2 years until we finally had to put her down for her arthritis. I pray your pup will recover soon, hang in there!!

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:31:45 PM EDT
I hope your little buddy comes out of this okay.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 3:07:45 AM EDT
My prayers go out for your dog.... Dont know what id do if I lost one of mine. They are indeed mans best friend...
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 5:10:14 AM EDT
Monday morning update posted above.

Thanks to everyone, again!

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:03:48 AM EDT
Prayers sent
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:14:08 AM EDT
Sorry, Hope your pup gets better.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:14:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 6:15:06 AM EDT by krinkfreak]
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:30:35 AM EDT
I'm super sorry for you pal. We went through a similar event a couple years ago with our yellow lab. Those dogs have got to be the best family animal on earth. They love unconditionally and are just great great dogs and friends. We still very much miss him.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:29:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By krinkfreak:
Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge.

When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable.

All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor; those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind.

They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent; His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster.

You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart.

Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together....

Author unknown...



Thanks for that, now I'm weeping again.

efxguy
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:35:07 AM EDT
efxguy - don't worry, you are not the only one crying. I had to put two dogs down this winter. It was the hardest thing.

I am so happy for you that you are able to help your dog. My best to you and your dog. I wish him a speedy recovery.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:53:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 7:58:15 AM EDT by Gaelic_Warrior]
When the dog gets home, you may want to get a food/water dish that is adjustable in height so that he doesn't have to strain or hurt himself when he bends his neck to eat or drink. Or you can rest the current dishes on top of something that would be closer to his mouth.



http://www.petco.com/Shop/Product.aspx?R=3853&sku=785954&redirectURL=%2fShop%2fProductList.aspx%3fPC%3dproductlist%26Nao%3d20%26Nav%3d17­9%26N%3d22%2520106%26cp%3d3&PC=productlist&Nao=20&Nav=179&N=22+106&cp=3


I hope it helps. Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:23:39 AM EDT
Glad to see hes probably going to make a recovery. Alot of people put the pets down for reasons that can be cured. I personaly would rather have my best friend next to me as long as possible mroe then any amount of cash in the world... some people might say its just a dog, but alot of that depends on how you raise your dog. If its bought and raised as a work dog most dont get too attached, raised in side as a member of the family its almost like have children.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:30:32 AM EDT
i hear ya. my moms dog which was my little girl at one point has epilepsy and various other problems. i shed a tear over the whole thing once or twice. my boy now whos only a little over a year old refused to eat when my wife and i went to get married. when we came home we had to take him to get a infusion of liquids and had to put him on special dog food for a week. poor little guy is a bit of a wuss it seems.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:12:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 7:13:04 PM EDT by efxguy]
Here are some other photos. Thanks David for hosting them on your server!
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:13:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 7:15:40 PM EDT by efxguy]
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