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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/2/2005 9:50:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2005 9:51:11 AM EDT by Princeton]
I just got back from a store but on the way I got lost and instead ended up at their engineering facility. Not realizing I was in the wrong place I walked in the front door and started wandering the building. I thought it kind of odd that it looked nothing like a store but who knows? Well, the first guy I run into I explain what I'm looking for and he explains to me that I'm in the wrong building.
The funny thing is he then goes on to ask me how I got into the building?
I just walked in the front door! But that's impossible since this is a "secure" building. He escorts me to the lobby and goes to find someone to give me directions to the right place.
While standing in the lobby at least 6 employees enter through the front door after wiping their hand in front something outside (I later find out its a thumb scanner of some sort.)

Not one person realized that the door wasn't locked???


Now thinking about the building where I work.

Pre-9/11 everyone entering the building had to show an employee ID. Not perfect by a long shot. When I would forget my ID I would just wave my ATM card in the air and the guard would wave to me.

Post-9/11 the entrance was "updated" with a security fence with a magnetic lock that only opens with a key card. The funny thing is that only the first person through the gate has to swipe the card, everyone else get a free pass.
To add to the ridiculousness of this system, When the new system was installed the security guards stopped even looking at who was entering the building. They rarely look up from whatever they are reading.



This could almost qualify as a JOTD (joke of the day) if it weren't so true.

Link Posted: 8/2/2005 10:01:12 AM EDT
A poorly implemented and monitored system is as bad as no system.

Sounds like you have shown examples of two horribly implemented, and monitored, systems.

Link Posted: 8/2/2005 10:02:19 AM EDT
I have a small but growing collection of "Visitor" badges to semi-to-very secure facilities that I either forget to return when I leave, or my contact tells me to keep for next time when I come back. In one case, the "Visitor" badge gives me full elevator privileges, something only about 10% of their employees have!

Of course, I did get "drawn down" on in Nicosea, Cyprus once because I had wandered into a place I shouldn't have been!
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 10:05:33 AM EDT
Back in tech school for the Air Force we had to show our ID cards to the airmen working CQ every time we came in.

Now this was back in the old green ID card days and I found that if you folded up a one dollar bill it looked enough like an ID card for as quick as they looked at it. I never once got questioned as to why I looked an aweful lot like George Washington.
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 10:08:46 AM EDT
Both instances have likely been implemented by "Hairymouth Security Consulting"....you know their motto....'If you look at the roofs of our mouths...you can see the roots of our hair!"

I fail to understand the willingness of Companies to purchase and implement a security system like the palm scanners or card locks....then totally ignore the required training for the people who are charged with the job of MONITORING these systems.

Link Posted: 8/2/2005 10:09:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2005 10:11:11 AM EDT by Princeton]
Had to add, one of the rooms where I work has a huge overhead door access for forklift entry and is timed. If the door stays open too long an alarm is supposed to sound. Someone completely shrink wrapped the alarm a few months back and the door stays open most of the day and you cannot even hear the alarm. I religiously keep it shut at night when I'm not using it as I want to keep the riff-raff out. The funny thing is that no one ever comes to see what's up. Like no one even monitors the alarms , ever!

Also, for the smaller doors we learned if you put a thin magnetic strip across the face of the magnetic lock it will allow the lock to engage but with just a little bit of pressure the door will open.

I'm hoping the Pentagon is using better security than we are.
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 12:33:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SHIVAN:
A poorly implemented and monitored system is as bad as no system.

Sounds like you have shown examples of two horribly implemented, and monitored, systems.





Bingo. Also sounds like a training issue with your security department.


Where I work, all perimeter doors and some interior doors are secured with an access control system. Each main entrance is monitored in person by a security guard who watches the status screen, makes visual contact with each person, and checks to see what they're carrying. Secondary entrances are monitored via CCTV, and the access list for these entrances is highly limited. There's more, but that's the gist of it.
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 1:25:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Princeton:

I'm hoping the Pentagon is using better security than we are.



Their not.
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 1:27:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sslocal:

Originally Posted By Princeton:

I'm hoping the Pentagon is using better security than we are.



Their not.


How do you figure? Have you ever been in a secure area?
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 2:12:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2005 2:16:04 PM EDT by Mauser101]
Friend of mine in college wandered into a Secret Service Protection Detail once. He was just tooting along not paying attention to where he was going. Looked up and say a MIB and stopped in his tracks. MIB notices him (after he'd already approached to within a 10 or so feet) and they have a nice chat on a bench while they check his ID and 'detain' him until the VIP moves off. They were as suprised as he was.

It's funny the weird stuff that can happen when you don't pay attention to where you are oging.


EDIT: This was during the Clinton Admin. Think it was near his home in San Jose.
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