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Posted: 10/11/2007 9:33:12 AM EST
After doing a Google search still the answer to my question is not solidly formed.
What are early indications that a Supervisor or Manager has reached their level of incompetence?
By your experiences, regardless of the size the organization.
Misc
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:39:02 AM EST
Anybody?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:42:25 AM EST
Check out the book The Peter Principle by L. Peter

"The Peter Principle is a colloquial principle of hierarchiology , stated as "In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence."

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:42:52 AM EST
the day you meet them?

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:43:55 AM EST
In general, generalizations suck
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:45:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By dedfella:
In general, generalizations suck


But they are generally correct.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:45:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By Brians_45:

Originally Posted By dedfella:
In general, generalizations suck


But they are generally correct.



yes, generally speaking
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 10:00:41 AM EST
A Supervisor or Managers level of incompetence is in direct relation to that of who they manage / supervise.
The best Manager in the world will look like crap if all his people are 'incompetent', but, the worst manager will look fairly good if his people are 'competent'.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 10:05:26 AM EST
Sometimes a person can be promoted beyond his level of incompetence. In an organization where people are hard to fire a person can be promoted and laterally moved as a means of getting rid of that person. This is especially true if the person is a member of a protected class.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:13:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By FightingHellfish:
Sometimes a person can be promoted beyond his level of incompetence. In an organization where people are hard to fire a person can be promoted and laterally moved as a means of getting rid of that person. This is especially true if the person is a member of a protected class.


Do you work for the .gov? The circumstance you describe seems to be the current norm, there.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 10:45:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 11:05:16 PM EST by prk]
One good sign is when they screw stuff up and then puff about their success in the matter.
The key here is when they don't recognize their own incompetence -- can't conceive that they might be wrong about something, ever.

Often this is accompanied by excessive confidence and rapid-fire conversation.

Micromanaging on stuff they theoretically have delegated (as opposed to checking in occasionally to monitor progress) is another bad omen.

If you see signs that they do not listen well, beware.

Claims that they are strictly a "big picture", "idea" person and can not be bothered with details when the situation calls for details.

Excessive use of buzzwords and trite, trendy, 'cutting edge' management phrases.

Prone to accuse you of insubordination when you suggest a good reason to do something a different way, or when there is a legitimate, over-riding, concern that may make it unwise to do what they say.

"Pulling rank" when there is no need to.

Fails to give credit to those who come up with a good idea or other success; appropriates same for their own benefit.

Oversimplification of work that truly is complex -- you hear "This is a slam dunk," when it's recognizably going to be a major time sink.

Won't stand up for their people, can't stand conflict. Never finds spine to speak frankly with their own superior about a questionable directive given them.


Link Posted: 10/12/2007 12:01:18 AM EST
Dilbert
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