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Posted: 4/21/2014 1:13:24 PM EDT
I've had my tacoma for a while now and want to start throwing a little money at it to make it more off-road ready. I have the tires and wheels taken care of so I'd like to start getting recovery gear and stuff that will be a big help on the trails taken care of. Money isn't really an issue as I prefer top quality stuff and can take my time making larger purchases. My biggest problem is space. It's a regular cab so just about everything will be in the bed. I plan to get a shell of some kind to go on the bed so the stuff will be covered and somewhat secured.

I don't currently have a lift but will be getting one in the future. This isn't a major concern since I don't plan to go larger tire wise, but everything will weigh the truck down so it will get one eventually. I'm more concerned with gear that will help me if I get stuck by myself or with a passenger.

Link Posted: 4/21/2014 2:26:21 PM EDT
Gloves, flashlight, snatch straps, winch, D-rings, snatch blocks, tree savers, towels/blanket, shovel, high-lift jack, and wheel chocks. Then check around your area for 4x4 club so you can learn how to properly use the stuff.
Link Posted: 4/21/2014 2:27:39 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Gixxersixxer:
Gloves, flashlight, snatch straps, winch, D-rings, snatch blocks, tree savers, towels/blanket, shovel, high-lift jack, and wheel chocks. Then check around your area for 4x4 club so you can learn how to properly use the stuff.
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Good list. I would add an air compressor and a full size spare to the list
Link Posted: 4/21/2014 3:38:21 PM EDT
What has already been listed is what I was coming here to say. Hi-lift jacks are amazing and can be used as a come-along in a pinch (Have done this multiple times). Some type of on-board air wether is a compressor or CO2. If you wanna go balls-out, on-board underhood welder is the shit too! Jumper cables, or a jump-box when by yourself. Dual batteries that are isolated from each other are nice too. Don't forget emergency supplies like food, water, clothing suited fro the environment you are wheeling in in case none of the above can get you out. Extra fluids of all sorts (gear, tranny, trasnfer case, tranny, and motor oils, coolant, etc. Plenty of hand tools for repairs. Know your vehcile inside and out and have spare parts available for common breakage issues (u-joints, axles, etc.) and know how to cahnge them with basic tools.

When I wheeled my 85 Chevy half ton hard I knew what would break and got damn good at replacing them in the mud, dirt, snow, ice, sand whatever.

Hope this helps
Link Posted: 4/21/2014 6:37:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Gixxersixxer:
Gloves, flashlight, snatch straps, winch, D-rings, snatch blocks, tree savers, towels/blanket, shovel, high-lift jack, and wheel chocks. Then check around your area for 4x4 club so you can learn how to properly use the stuff.
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This.
+ an axe or saw, maybe both.
Link Posted: 4/21/2014 7:07:29 PM EDT
Look into Maxtrax. Also the TJM copy TRED. Get a high lift and a lift-mate. Shovel. Hitch receiver shackle mount, some shackles, and a snatch strap. Air compressor and tire repair kit.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 5:40:12 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By HighCaliber:
Look into Maxtrax. Also the TJM copy TRED. Get a high lift and a lift-mate. Shovel. Hitch receiver shackle mount, some shackles, and a snatch strap. Air compressor and tire repair kit.
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Maxtrax are one of the first things I'm getting. After that I'm getting the arb bag that comes with all the straps and other stuff. Are the Reese hi lift jacks any good? I have a gift card to tsc and they carry them but I don't want them if they're junk.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 6:58:20 PM EDT
Can't go wrong with buying the name brand hi lift, the cost difference isn't much. You'll be spending more on hi lift accessories than the jack, anyway.

Do some research on how to safely use a hi lift, and practice in your driveway to get a feel for how it works. They are very unstable, and the bar can easily cause serious injury or death. Keep in mind you are going to need steel bumpers and rock sliders to use the hi lift on, you should also get the wheel lift adapters.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 7:03:06 PM EDT
A quality Ground Anchor.


All the recovery gear in the world won't help you if there is nothing in range to attach to.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 7:29:43 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
A quality Ground Anchor.
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Buried spare tire
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 7:34:32 PM EDT
Learning how to drive off-road and knowing you and your limitations would be the first step. Find a local 4x4 club and go on some rides with them. I have seen some skilled drivers get some old beat up 4x4's up/through some gnar and have seen others with their new lifted and locked jeeps unable to make it though some pretty easy stuff considering what their vehicles were capable of.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 7:34:47 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By jeremy223:

Buried spare tire
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Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
A quality Ground Anchor.

Buried spare tire


Ton of work to replace a good anchor that is self setting and even easier recovering. But yes a tire buried will work.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 7:40:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:


Ton of work to replace a good anchor that is self setting and even easier recovering. But yes a tire buried will work.
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Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
A quality Ground Anchor.

Buried spare tire


Ton of work to replace a good anchor that is self setting and even easier recovering. But yes a tire buried will work.

For sure, but I've never seen a dedicated anchor that was worth the space and weight it takes. Granted, in my AO, it is mostly rock crawling, any mud is in alpine areas where trees are abundant.
Link Posted: 4/23/2014 11:51:41 PM EDT
Good solid tow hooks, front and rear.

I have the stuff listed above, and I finally got around to getting one of these:



For times when I'm trying to recover a vehicle that doesn't have good, accessible tow hooks. It was $75 through AWDirect, a tow truck catalog.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 3:29:38 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By jeremy223:

For sure, but I've never seen a dedicated anchor that was worth the space and weight it takes. Granted, in my AO, it is mostly rock crawling, any mud is in alpine areas where trees are abundant.
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Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
A quality Ground Anchor.

Buried spare tire


Ton of work to replace a good anchor that is self setting and even easier recovering. But yes a tire buried will work.

For sure, but I've never seen a dedicated anchor that was worth the space and weight it takes. Granted, in my AO, it is mostly rock crawling, any mud is in alpine areas where trees are abundant.


Depending on the part of TX the OP is in he might have lots of mud/ruts and few trees with a deep root system.

Different AO different tools.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:20:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:01:06 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:


Depending on the part of TX the OP is in he might have lots of mud/ruts and few trees with a deep root system.

Different AO different tools.
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Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Originally Posted By jeremy223:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
A quality Ground Anchor.

Buried spare tire


Ton of work to replace a good anchor that is self setting and even easier recovering. But yes a tire buried will work.

For sure, but I've never seen a dedicated anchor that was worth the space and weight it takes. Granted, in my AO, it is mostly rock crawling, any mud is in alpine areas where trees are abundant.


Depending on the part of TX the OP is in he might have lots of mud/ruts and few trees with a deep root system.

Different AO different tools.


There's plenty of trees where I'm at, but I have yet to see any on the beaches.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 3:18:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 3:19:07 PM EDT by Merlin]
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Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Good solid tow hooks, front and rear.

I have the stuff listed above, and I finally got around to getting one of these:

http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mXXHtG4Xtd5TtHx35Nwqyig.jpg

For times when I'm trying to recover a vehicle that doesn't have good, accessible tow hooks. It was $75 through AWDirect, a tow truck catalog.
View Quote


And what does AWDirect say about using those hooks for recovery?

Not for recovery tech tip Their catalog page for hooks: http://www.awdirect.com/icatalog/p.asp?page=287
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 3:34:03 PM EDT
Others have it pretty well covered but I'd add a fire extinguisher. I don't leave home without one and definitely wheel with one.

since you have a Toyota?, check out TTORA. Great club that I wheel with.

have fun
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 8:25:00 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Merlin:


And what does AWDirect say about using those hooks for recovery?

Not for recovery tech tip Their catalog page for hooks: http://www.awdirect.com/icatalog/p.asp?page=287
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Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Good solid tow hooks, front and rear.

I have the stuff listed above, and I finally got around to getting one of these:

http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mXXHtG4Xtd5TtHx35Nwqyig.jpg

For times when I'm trying to recover a vehicle that doesn't have good, accessible tow hooks. It was $75 through AWDirect, a tow truck catalog.


And what does AWDirect say about using those hooks for recovery?

Not for recovery tech tip Their catalog page for hooks: http://www.awdirect.com/icatalog/p.asp?page=287


They can say it all they want. Tow truck drivers use them all day long.

And I've yet to find a better solution for recovering a vehicle that doesn't have good tow hooks. Wrapping chains around random stuff underneath the chassis is just a good way to break stuff.

I'd rather take my bets on whether I'll exceed some WLL on a quality piece of gear.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:56:00 AM EDT
Rescue tape, jbweld, cable ties and duct tape.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 9:08:02 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By pevrs114:


They can say it all they want. Tow truck drivers use them all day long.

And I've yet to find a better solution for recovering a vehicle that doesn't have good tow hooks. Wrapping chains around random stuff underneath the chassis is just a good way to break stuff.

I'd rather take my bets on whether I'll exceed some WLL on a quality piece of gear.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Good solid tow hooks, front and rear.

I have the stuff listed above, and I finally got around to getting one of these:

http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mXXHtG4Xtd5TtHx35Nwqyig.jpg

For times when I'm trying to recover a vehicle that doesn't have good, accessible tow hooks. It was $75 through AWDirect, a tow truck catalog.


And what does AWDirect say about using those hooks for recovery?

Not for recovery tech tip Their catalog page for hooks: http://www.awdirect.com/icatalog/p.asp?page=287


They can say it all they want. Tow truck drivers use them all day long.

And I've yet to find a better solution for recovering a vehicle that doesn't have good tow hooks. Wrapping chains around random stuff underneath the chassis is just a good way to break stuff.

I'd rather take my bets on whether I'll exceed some WLL on a quality piece of gear.


We use the web Y slings and cut the center loop off and just use one leg in the wreckers. Haven't broken one yet.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 9:16:51 AM EDT
PSP makes a good deadman
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 9:23:12 AM EDT
Web slings and wraps are much safer than chains any day. Straps are more elastic for a reason and are best for tugging.

Use the right item for the job and be much safer.

I carry a 40,000 lb 30 foot strap and several web slings.

I use the web slings for when there is no tow point.

One thing no one mentioned is a blanket or old coat. Lay it across the recovery line. It helps dampen the stored energy if something breaks.

It maybe be silly and not necessary to some but being safe is no joke. Get hit by a sling, strap, or chain and you probably won't live long enough to get to the hospital.


I speak from past experience from stupid mistakes. I was hauling logs out of the woods using a chain. My first mistake. I was pulling using the front tow points. Second mistake. Log got stuck so I decided to tug it. Third mistake. Chain broke came flying back thru the windshield. It hit the seat back right beside me. Impossible to remove brown stain from seats. It was a constant reminder don't be stupid.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 11:11:40 AM EDT
spare outer front axle shaft and spare locking hub to add to above listed recovery equip.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 11:26:23 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By aloo:
spare outer front axle shaft and spare locking hub to add to above listed recovery equip.
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Go ahead and add U Joints for axle and driveshaft.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 12:07:41 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By SandHillsHillbilly:

Go ahead and add U Joints for axle and driveshaft.
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Originally Posted By SandHillsHillbilly:
Originally Posted By aloo:
spare outer front axle shaft and spare locking hub to add to above listed recovery equip.

Go ahead and add U Joints for axle and driveshaft.


He doesn't have ujoints in the front axle. CV joints so he need extra of those and you are right he will need them....
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 5:03:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/25/2014 5:05:37 PM EDT by pevrs114]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SandHillsHillbilly:
Web slings and wraps are much safer than chains any day. Straps are more elastic for a reason and are best for tugging.

Use the right item for the job and be much safer.

I carry a 40,000 lb 30 foot strap and several web slings.

I use the web slings for when there is no tow point.

One thing no one mentioned is a blanket or old coat. Lay it across the recovery line. It helps dampen the stored energy if something breaks.

It maybe be silly and not necessary to some but being safe is no joke. Get hit by a sling, strap, or chain and you probably won't live long enough to get to the hospital.


I speak from past experience from stupid mistakes. I was hauling logs out of the woods using a chain. My first mistake. I was pulling using the front tow points. Second mistake. Log got stuck so I decided to tug it. Third mistake. Chain broke came flying back thru the windshield. It hit the seat back right beside me. Impossible to remove brown stain from seats. It was a constant reminder don't be stupid.
View Quote



This is good advice, and I'd add learn the proper way to use a Hi-Lift jack. They can and will kill you. I got inside the handle's arc one day and got popped in the side of the neck. I was literally stunned for a few minutes, I just laid on the ground blinking my eyes. A few inches higher and it could have cracked my skull.

There's some good YouTube vids, and Overland Journal did a good article on it too.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 6:16:56 PM EDT
We all learn the hard way sometimes but we never forget it.

I learned about hi-lifts the same way. Got down on my hands and knees to look at something under the truck. Handle fell down and cracked me on the back of my head.
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 11:10:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2014 11:15:37 AM EDT by Keekleberrys]
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 5:28:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2014 5:30:48 PM EDT by maggiethecat]
Didnt read the thread, so forgive me if it's been mentioned.
Just like a first aid kit is useless without knowledge, recovery gear is also. Dangerous even.

Learn how to properly use the gear, and when. Your 8K winch may be plenty, until you are frame deep in mud. thenis it enough?

There is an Army TM that is great for learning self recovery.

EDIT:
Deadsled's link. Learn it.
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