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Posted: 4/24/2011 6:41:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2011 6:43:08 AM EDT by BatchelorGroda]
I picked this up yesterday...

It's a 1950's Rockwell-Delta 10x24 machine lathe...Infinite variable speed spindle (50-2500 rpm) and powered crossfeed...all on 100 single phase OR 220 3 phase config.

Aside from being a bit dirty and having the typical light surface rust, it's complete and in working order.

The big "plus" on this machine is that it also uses collets...unfortunately they are 4C's, which are not cheap.

This will be next winters restoration project.

Took the guy 5 minutes to put it into my truck with a forklift, and about 2 hours for me to take it apart to get it out of my truck...using a winch.

It came out of a high school Industrial Arts room. It was never used for production unless it was probably making pot pipes and brass plumb-bobs.

I also received two Mitutoyo mics... two Starret dial indicator sets...Two Mitutoyo verniers and a stainless Starret depth/protractor combo...all of the instruments appear to be of 1980's vintage.

All of this for $750.



Link Posted: 4/24/2011 7:19:49 AM EDT
I hate you.

Seriously though, good score. Best of luck on the restoration.

I still live in the barracks, so I'm very limited in the footprint of what I can have. That wouldnt fit through the door.
Link Posted: 4/24/2011 8:23:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By midwinter:
I hate you.

Seriously though, good score. Best of luck on the restoration.

I still live in the barracks, so I'm very limited in the footprint of what I can have. That wouldnt fit through the door.


Bummer!

This actually has a small footprint...its about 30" x 70".

Link Posted: 4/24/2011 9:32:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2011 9:38:06 AM EDT by DonOhio39]
That's a good score from what I can see. I'm a little envious.

My 12X36 Atlas Craftsman, while having a longer distance between centers, isn't as sturdy a machine as yours. Plus it was bought for the same price as you paid. I did get a shitload of misc stuff with it that I think made the deal worth the money.

Your post sounds as if I don't need to mention that rust removal should be a NONABRASIVE operation. But I've mentioned it anyway, just in case. I've seen several "restored" machines that had the rust SANDED off the formerly precision ground surfaces. Not a pretty sight at all.

Once again, you did good, hope you make good use of that fine machine.

Don in Ohio


ETA Remember that there is a Gunsmithing/machining forum in the ARMORY section. Lots of knowledgeable people over there, eager to answer questions on machining and gun work.



Link Posted: 4/24/2011 2:47:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DonOhio39:
That's a good score from what I can see. I'm a little envious.

My 12X36 Atlas Craftsman, while having a longer distance between centers, isn't as sturdy a machine as yours. Plus it was bought for the same price as you paid. I did get a shitload of misc stuff with it that I think made the deal worth the money.

Your post sounds as if I don't need to mention that rust removal should be a NONABRASIVE operation. But I've mentioned it anyway, just in case. I've seen several "restored" machines that had the rust SANDED off the formerly precision ground surfaces. Not a pretty sight at all.

Once again, you did good, hope you make good use of that fine machine.

Don in Ohio


ETA Remember that there is a Gunsmithing/machining forum in the ARMORY section. Lots of knowledgeable people over there, eager to answer questions on machining and gun work.





Yep...NEVER sand the rails, or most any machined surfaces for that matter.

I actually just got a "liquid" rust remover that's supposedly great for removing light surface rust. I will try it some things.

If that does not work, I would just dip it in an oxalic acid solution as it does not eat the metal like muriatic.

The rest I will have sand-blasted. The cabinet is almost "perfect", except for some surface rust around the bottom 1" of the cabinet and stand.

This one is going to be mostly a cleaning and painting anyway. The rails are not even gouged-up or warped.
Link Posted: 4/24/2011 3:15:42 PM EDT
Nice.
Link Posted: 4/24/2011 3:25:33 PM EDT
I was interested reading in the antiques section of practical machinist about using single edge razors to remove surface rust.The guy (rivett608) gets good results judging from the pics.I have a rusted pratt & whitney level to try this out on next time I get to the store to get razors
Link Posted: 4/24/2011 7:22:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2011 7:25:30 PM EDT by BatchelorGroda]
Originally Posted By paulx:
I was interested reading in the antiques section of practical machinist about using single edge razors to remove surface rust.The guy (rivett608) gets good results judging from the pics.I have a rusted pratt & whitney level to try this out on next time I get to the store to get razors


I used to collect old beer cans at one point.

We would go out to the old dumps and dig them up.

Oxalic acid is by far, the most effective, yet easy-on-the-metal rust remover I have come across.

We would find "mystery cans", take them home and let them sit in an oxalic bath for about an hour.

When done, you would be able to read almost everything on the label.

For tools, regular "catalyst penetrant" types of lube, combined with a Scotch Brite pad usually do the trick.

You can get varying levels of abrasiveness in the pads.

Green = Mild, use it on glass and dishware.

Grey = Medium, will haze a polished surface.

Red = Harsh, will actually abrade the metal.

Those are all available at HomeDepot,,,Even better stuff is available elsewhere.

BTW...I was poking around at the lathe today...There is no rust "pitting" on anything, Just very, VERY light rust on the rails and a couple gears in the head.

Near as I can tell, all of the bolts are rust-free and covered in grimy dirt.

The belts on this machine are (I believe) original...and show almost no wear...still as supple as a new belt should be!

This is gonna be easy.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:35:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2011 4:40:21 PM EDT by Cole2534]
Are you sure it can be run on 220 3ph and 110 1ph?

I don't think I've ever seen a motor do that...

Regardless- the answer is 3ph with a small VFD.

Also pull the chuck and figure out what thread the spindle nose is. If it's 1-1/2 8 you're in luck: that's the same pitch as a South Bend 9".

Mentioning that machine on practical machinist will get you banned, so don't. That's a website for professionals and they do not tolerate machines of lesser quality. Rather, homeshopmachinist should take care of you.

Welcome to the world of Old Iron Syndrome. This shit multiplies like BRD only dreams it could. :)

Good luck!

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Link Posted: 4/27/2011 6:38:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cole2534:
Are you sure it can be run on 220 3ph and 110 1ph?

I don't think I've ever seen a motor do that...

Regardless- the answer is 3ph with a small VFD.

Also pull the chuck and figure out what thread the spindle nose is. If it's 1-1/2 8 you're in luck: that's the same pitch as a South Bend 9".

Mentioning that machine on practical machinist will get you banned, so don't. That's a website for professionals and they do not tolerate machines of lesser quality. Rather, homeshopmachinist should take care of you.

Welcome to the world of Old Iron Syndrome. This shit multiplies like BRD only dreams it could. :)

Good luck!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Im not absolutely sure on the 220 3-phase...but I believe the motor is listed as 110 single....maybe it can also be 220, not necessarily "3 phase", but 3 wire? I will have to look at it later.

I pulled the chuck...kind of a bitch...near as I can tell, it has never been off and the spindle end looks brand new...It is definitely 1.5" *Tpi

Is this machine kinda like a HiPoint?

I used to have an old Atlas/Craftsman...this new machine is 100x beefier...I chuckled when I saw the genuine STEEL gears
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 7:32:14 PM EDT
If it says 220v, and not 240v, its not 3 phase. No big deal, my similarly sized south bend is 110v and it works fine.

That's a good sign on the spindle nose. To measure the pitch, and 8 is very easy, use a tape measure in this case. There should be an 1/8" between each thread crest.

That machine isnt really high point grade, but the two aren't real easy to relate in this fashion. Its also not a Sig Sauer. It is a decent starting point to see if you like machines for sure.

It looks like it has a lead screw, that's good regardless of your desire to cut screw threads. This will allow you to power feed the carriage and that's infinitely useful.

The most important tool your lathe has is your imagination on how to use it.

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Link Posted: 4/28/2011 1:41:57 PM EDT
Yep, you have power feed and the ability to cut threads.
I am assuming the machine has a thru spindle? If so, you can chamber barrel blanks if you desire.
A quick change tool post would be a nice addition.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 2:18:06 PM EDT
Very nice lathe, it's a small too room / maintenance lathe. You need to check out Travers Tool at Travers.com good selection of machine tools at good prices.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 2:20:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DonofKalifornia:
Very nice lathe, it's a small too room / maintenance lathe. You need to check out Travers Tool at Travers.com good selection of machine tools at good prices.


Has a quick change box so you can cut threads, see if you got metric gears for the box. Most likely it is 220 single phase, maybe even 110.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 6:22:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DonofKalifornia:

You need to check out Travers Tool at Travers.com good selection of machine tools at good prices.

+1 for these guys, they usually beat MSC's prices and ship fast. Get on their mailing list, many good deals to be had there.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 10:51:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Originally Posted By DonofKalifornia:

You need to check out Travers Tool at Travers.com good selection of machine tools at good prices.

+1 for these guys, they usually beat MSC's prices and ship fast. Get on their mailing list, many good deals to be had there.


Also its fun to deal with NYC
Link Posted: 5/3/2011 6:22:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/3/2011 6:23:31 AM EDT by BatchelorGroda]
Originally Posted By jchewie1:
Yep, you have power feed and the ability to cut threads.
I am assuming the machine has a thru spindle? If so, you can chamber barrel blanks if you desire.
A quick change tool post would be a nice addition.


The motor is 110 or 220 single phase just to clear that up.

Yes, it has a through-spindle that takes 4C collets...somewhat rare collets, but collets nonetheless. They go up to 3/4.

I am looking for a quick-change post.

Originally Posted By DonofKalifornia:
Very nice lathe, it's a small too room / maintenance lathe. You need to check out Travers Tool at Travers.com good selection of machine tools at good prices.


This one is just fine for me. I have very few plans to use it. I just like old, quality machines.
Link Posted: 5/3/2011 3:40:42 PM EDT
I think he's meaning tooling- boring bars, taps, drill, the expensive part of the operation! :D

With regard to a quick change tool post- I am not sure if I like mine yet. Its great for running preformed tools, no doubt. For running something I grind it's a pain in the ass. I dont grind the same angle everytime so some of that economy of speed is lost. However for running boring bars and the like it seems pretty slick.

If you have any questions please ask- I'm no master machinist, but I like to think I have a decent handle on things.

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