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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/12/2002 2:22:52 PM EDT
If it is zero degrees outside today and it is supposed to be twice as cold tomorrow how cold will it be? [>:/] [bounce]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:26:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 2:27:05 PM EDT by Corporal_Chaos]
Using what temperature measurement?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:28:21 PM EDT
Cold enough to freeze the nose residents. Stepped-init
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:40:41 PM EDT
It will still be zero degrees. Freezing is freezing... doesnt get any colder... What do I win?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:43:54 PM EDT
You do need a point of reference. But if it is 0 degrees C today then tommorow it will be -17 degrees C If it is 0 degrees F Then it will be -32 degrees F.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:44:51 PM EDT
Not true ComputerGuy. You could convert zero degrees Farenheit to Celcius and multiply that times negative two for the answer. The only way this wouldn't work is with Kelvin measurements because zero degrees Kelvin is as cold as cold can get and has thus far proved impossible to achieve. At least this is my understanding of temperatures.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:45:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ComputerGuy: It will still be zero degrees. Freezing is freezing... doesnt get any colder... What do I win?
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Trust me, it can get colder. There is a big difference between 0 deg F and -20 deg F Stepped-init
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:48:35 PM EDT
Well……. I really wasn’t expecting an answer. It was just one of those “silly” Questions like, Why do you press harder on a remote control when you know the battery is dead? [:I] I just thought you guys might have more!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:49:21 PM EDT
Hot and cold are subjective terms...so, twice as cold as 0 degrees would be a subjective experience unique to the individual. IOW, twice as cold as 0 degrees may be -1 degrees for a resident of Fiji, or it may be -50 degrees for an Alaskan.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:52:15 PM EDT
True in some instances Yankee but it can also be said that cold was used to refrence which way the temperature was moving, thus meaning that the temperature would fall into the negative spectrum as opposed to hot which would indicate a increase in the temperature.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:53:21 PM EDT
-32.00 F -35.54 C -255.37 K
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:58:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos: True in some instances Yankee but it can also be said that cold was used to refrence which way the temperature was moving, thus meaning that the temperature would fall into the negative spectrum as opposed to hot which would indicate a increase in the temperature.
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Are you trying to define "q"?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 2:59:06 PM EDT
I think your conversions are incorrect. I believe -32 degrees F is 241 degrees K.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:00:55 PM EDT
Just presenting what I believe to be the logical evaluation of the original question. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:05:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos: I think your conversions are incorrect. I believe -32 degrees F is 241 degrees K.
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I don't think so.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:09:54 PM EDT
Yes, I'm almost positive of it. Let me do some looking. I'm a little rusty on my chemestry right now but I'll find the exact conversions.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:12:01 PM EDT
OK.... Sure. But how do you say "tortilla" ? [smoke]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:12:53 PM EDT
But, the other guy isn't correct in the conversions either, I don't think, but, then again, I'm not sure what his point was: C to F: (9/5*Temperature in F) +32 F to C: (Temperature in F -32) *5/9 C to K: (Temperature in C + 273.15)
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:15:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 3:19:07 PM EDT by Corporal_Chaos]
-32 degrees Fahrenheit equals 237.594 degrees Kelvin. The general rule (for 'close enough' situations) is that to convert from Fahrenheit to Kelvin you add 273, drop the F and add a K. That means that 0 degrees K would be in the area of -270ish degrees F, which has never occured in nature and has yet to be duplicated in science. It is a common theory that all molecular motion stops at 0 degrees Kelvin.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:23:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos: -32 degrees Fahrenheit equals 237.594 degrees Kelvin. The general rule (for 'close enough' situations) is that to convert from Fahrenheit to Kelvin you add 273, drop the F and add a K. That means that 0 degrees K would be in the area of -270ish degrees F, which has never occured in nature and has yet to be duplicated in science. It is a common theory that all molecular motion stops at 0 degrees Kelvin.
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Please re-read. 0 K is much colder than "-270ish" F.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:24:29 PM EDT
Oh, I guess you meant C.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:28:42 PM EDT
No, think about, you reverse the equation and subtract 273 (roughly) from 0, drop the F and add the K. It is actually slightly higher than that but not much.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:31:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 3:32:15 PM EDT by Corporal_Chaos]
Oops. you're right, I booped. Thanks for the correction. Summer time out of school kills brain cells. [:)] I confused Fahrenheit with Centigrad.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:35:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos: I think your conversions are incorrect. I believe -32 degrees F is 241 degrees K.
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You're close. -32F = 237.59K Since the Q was ".. 0 deg and twice as cold..." 0 K = -459.67F or -273.15C (x2) -255.37K or -273.0K I Had obviously used F, but while double checking my math and cross checking, I found the anamoly between C and F.. I'll stop here as 0 degrees Kelvin is the point at which all motion in matter stops; it is known as "absolute zero." and theoreticly impossible to go lower than that. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:37:58 PM EDT
It seems we both jumbled[:)]. At least we knew what we meant[:D].
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:50:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos: Oops. you're right, I booped. Thanks for the correction. Summer time out of school kills brain cells. [:)] I confused Fahrenheit with Centigrad.
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Centigrad? Isn't that the city the Russians and Nazis were fighting over in WW2?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:54:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:54:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 3:57:35 PM EDT by Corporal_Chaos]
It may be slightly misspelled but it is equivalent to Celsius. EDIT TO FIX SPELLING.....[:)]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:59:11 PM EDT
[sleep]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 10:28:42 PM EDT
Well.......... Answer me this, How do you play Chinese scrabble?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 10:38:07 PM EDT
Ask Feldman
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:03:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:09:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:19:49 PM EDT
Why are there Interstate Highways in Hawaii? If you're not supposed to drink and drive, why do they check your driver's license before selling you alcohol? Why do you park in the driveway, but drive on the parkway? I wouldn't know about the temperature. It was 117 high 91 low yesterday here in Kuwait.
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 1:27:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Lady_Glock: Well.......... Answer me this, How do you play Chinese scrabble?
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I really don't know, but if it's anything like how they play checkers, than it's probably weird!! [;D]
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 10:49:13 AM EDT
[>:/] I am confused….. So what you guys are saying is that you don't think it will ever be "twice as cold as 0 degrees" in either Fahrenheit or Celsius And we have to switch to "absolute zero." In another scale. In all scales absolute zero Equals -273.15 degrees Celsius, or about -460 degrees Fahrenheit, Or the degrees C plus 273.15, which is Kelvin, Or F plus 460. which is the degrees Rankine, Therefore when we say "twice as cold," we should mean this by it: "half the temperature on the Kelvin (or Rankine) scale." By this definition, "twice as cold as 0 C" is half of 273.15 K, which is 136.57 K. Converting this back to Celsius, we get -136.58 C (or -230 F.) That's very cold.. [whacko] -[smash] [smoke]
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 11:17:33 AM EDT
I have developed a coldness scale based on tongue sticking. Room Temperature: Tongue sticks to anything with super glue on it. Zero degrees: Tongue sticks to polished chrome or Hilary's ass. Minus 20 degrees: Tongue sticks to steel. Minus 40 degrees: Tongue sticks to rough aluminum. Minus 60 degrees: Tongue sticks to girfriend's lips. Minus 80 degress: Tongue sticks to, well, we won't go there. As you can see, it can't get any colder than 80 below.
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 12:07:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marvl: I have developed a coldness scale based on tongue sticking. Room Temperature: Tongue sticks to anything with super glue on it. Zero degrees: Tongue sticks to polished chrome or Hilary's ass. Minus 20 degrees: Tongue sticks to steel. Minus 40 degrees: Tongue sticks to rough aluminum. Minus 60 degrees: Tongue sticks to girfriend's lips. Minus 80 degress: Tongue sticks to, well, we won't go there. As you can see, it can't get any colder than 80 below.
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If it can't get any colder than 80 below, at what temperature does you Tongue stick to the roof of your mouth?
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 12:14:48 PM EDT
I guess that wasn't imponderable after all. It has been pondered to death.
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 1:21:17 PM EDT
Lady_Glock: In all scales absolute zero Equals -273.15 degrees Celsius, or about -460 degrees Fahrenheit, Or the degrees C plus 273.15, which is Kelvin, Or F plus 460. which is the degrees Rankine, Therefore when we say "twice as cold," we should mean this by it: "half the temperature on the Kelvin (or Rankine) scale." By this definition, "twice as cold as 0 C" is half of 273.15 K, which is 136.57 K. Converting this back to Celsius, we get -136.58 C (or -230 F.)
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I [b]meant[/b] to stop by to take a peek without posting (I'll never learn), but now I've got two burning questions! Lady_Glock, you nailed the right number [u]and[/u] the reason. A muddled, or misdirected definition is the secret to any good math puzzle (If a hen and a half lay an egg and a half in a day and a half...). So... Was the query a red herring all along (while you were you sitting on the trump card)? [:P] marvl, is the sticky tongue coefficient of 7075 T-6 w a nominally 0.002" thick chromic hard anodized coat of MIL-A-8625E [b]really lower[/b] than type M, class 1 Manganese on HC/MS steel w a 0.000035" thick phosphate coating? [:D]
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 2:45:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hank: think about it- when absolute sero is attained in a space, all molecular action or movement is stopped. for that to truly happen, everything around it, and around that, and around that (ad infinitum) would have to cease as well, being that even two air molecules moving causes some sort of heat, even measurable down to the millionths of degrees (c/f/k)...
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That's not bad reasoning, unless you could attain perfect vacuum. If the surrounding media had sufficiently low density, it is conceivable that a small sample could attain absolute zero and not be reheated by its environment for some time (until an errant molecule bumped into it). As for how to cool it if it's in a vacuum, there are ways to cool things using lasers. Since temperature is entirely equivalent to vibration of atoms/molecules, if you can suppress the vibration of atoms by laser bombardment, the sample will be cooled down. It sounds bass-ackwards, but there has been a Nobel prize awarded for this technique. You're definitely right, though, that cooling something to absolute zero using simple heat transfer just can't work unless the whole universe is at absolute zero.
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 3:03:19 PM EDT
Oh come on everyone. It's an incomplete question! It's like trying to solve a math with only one number. 2 + ? = ? "Cold" is a relative term. It has to have a frame of reference. In some areas, zero degress might be considered warm. Now, this topic is silly. The next one might be twice as silly. How silly would that be? [img]http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/mica/monk.gif[/img]
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