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Posted: 7/21/2008 4:16:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:17:13 PM EDT by BIGMITCHBAKER]
I was about to buy an LCD until my son threw a set of keys which hit my PC moniter and now i have a large crack that appears when i turn it on.

So are the LCD TVs just as easy to damage? Do they have a protective lens or something?

Is this gas recharging stuff i hear about plasma TVs true?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:20:52 PM EDT
LCD for computer monitors

Plasma for TVs (they have better contrast ratios and they're usually cheaper)
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:27:55 PM EDT
Plasmas are easier to damage.
They contain gas (duh, that's why they're called "plasma") that can rupture.
The screen covering (polycarb ?) is the same for both, IIRC.

Plasmas have a better picture, but LCDs are beginning to catch up.
And, manufacturers are getting away from plasmas as LCDs close the gap.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:40:54 PM EDT
I understand that picture quality isn't an issue because unless you are viewing a movie in HD format with and HD player you won't notice a difference from a regular TV. Blue ay is the same, but you can use a Blue ray machine and a Blue Ray DVD. Cable in my area only has about 5 channels in HD, he picture quality is amazing on my Sony HD LCD.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:46:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:49:19 PM EDT by JBlitzen]
I got an LCD recently, I love it. I don't know if plasma would look better, or how it would. I've stared at them in stores and still don't see the difference.

I'd suggest getting yours from amazon if you dare; they ship very reliably, support well, and it's a hell of a bargain.

This is my TV, a Samsung LN46A550:

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=728835

The last pic is just a coincidence of what was on some channel before I upgraded $13 to digital cable. It's broadcast at some weird, small, incorrect resolution, and I hadn't magnified it since I wasn't really watching it. The real HD channels I have now are usually full screen and look incredible.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:48:43 PM EDT
I personally prefer LCD myself. They've come a long ways as far as constrast.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:52:21 PM EDT
lcd. We have a plasma TV at work that is the same size/brand as my LCD but it is like a portable heater. I heard by time you have to recharge a plasma tv it will have reached its serviceable life span anyways.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:54:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ben72227:
LCD for computer monitors

Plasma for TVs (they have better contrast ratios and they're usually cheaper)



They are cheaper for a good reason.


I prefer and own LCD.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:55:43 PM EDT
I just had the same question when I got my TV. My philips tv has a 28000:1 contrast ratio and is a fast refresh rate making it on par with plasma plus the lifespan of a LCD. The burnin was what made me go with LCD in the first place
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:57:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:57:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AF1ACURA:
lcd. We have a plasma TV at work that is the same size/brand as my LCD but it is like a portable heater. I heard by time you have to recharge a plasma tv it will have reached its serviceable life span anyways.


I have noticed they put out alot of heat when i walk by them in stores. I live in North Dakota so maybe i should run Plasma in the winter?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:03:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 5:05:33 PM EDT by thompsondd]
LCDs are plastic and do not reflect light.

Plasma are glass and do reflect light.

If the room where it is going to be placed has a lot of light, windows, lamps, etc, plasmas will have reflection (at angles) on the viewing screen. LCDs will not reflect light at angles etc.

I prefer plasmas as they seem to have better picture quality currently. However, for the above reason, I put an LCD in the Living Room as it has full windows, plus a lot of lighting during evening hours from lamps etc. No reflection/glare on the screen at all.

I have a plasma in bedroom.

One other thing to take into consideration; if you are going to connect a high end game system such as PS3 or XBOX, go with either a plasma or an LCD with EXTREMELY low (aka FAST) response rate. Games will have some lag on LCDs.

There is NO reason NOT to buy a 1080p monitor at this point. IMHO, 720p and 1080i have a limited lifespan. They are on the WAY OUT already. Don't get sucked into their pricing.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:07:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

There is NO reason NOT to buy a 1080p monitor at this point. IMHO, 720p and 1080i have a limited lifespan. They are on the WAY OUT already. Don't get sucked into their pricing.


Pbsh...whatever. I challenge you to tell the difference between a 1080i input and a 1080p input on anything smaller than 40".

Also, pretty much every HD source from a satellite/cable provider is *1080i* not 1080p, you'll need a Bluray player to get that 1080p signal you claim is far superior.

For me and the 32" LCD I bought for my bedroom, it was absolutely NOT worth the extra $250 for the 1080p TV vs the 1080i/720p TV that will probably never have a Bluray player hooked up to it.

I have a 56" 1080p TV in my theater room, and it looks absolutely spectacular on 1080i. It might look a bit sharper with a Bluray player hooked up to it, but I honestly couldn't imagine it look much better after seeing some with Bluray players hooked up to the at Best Buy and the like...
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:13:30 PM EDT
Go to amazon.com and look at the top 19 selling TV's (linky not sure the link will work.) All are LCD's, and most are Samsung, either the A550, A650, or A750 series in 40", 46", or 52".
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:14:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 5:15:49 PM EDT by F22_RaptoR]
Plasma's are usually good, although when we were looking at TV's, the LCD's had better picture.

The listed contrast ratio means NOTHING.

Some TV's state its 1,000,000 to one, but when you look at the fine print closely, its really only 10,000 to 1 for "active" contrast ratio.


LG is pretty good, Sharp is arguably the best for the price.

Also, you need to realise, that unless you're watching a 1080i or 1080p movie (either with digital cable or blueray movie) that a REGULAR CRT or projection tv will appear better on normal cable channels.

Since the HD tv's are meant for HD, they cant adjust resolution like compulter monitors do, so they are scaling up the non digital image.


With plasma TV's you also gotta consider, that if you tilt it more than 30 degree's, the TV will be destroyed (due to the plasma screen)


I say LCD, they are more stable, and any 'problems' with burn in are gone with the new-er TV's. They have burn in protection which shifts the image 1 pixel every so often (which you cant see or notice at all) so it cant burn in.


ETA


We got a Vizio 47" LCD HDTV (which is basically uses all LG parts) and its got an incredible picture!

Watched a BluRay movie and it was amazing!
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:22:42 PM EDT
I'm waiting to see if the Mitsubishi Laser DLP lives up to all its hype.
Between LCD and Plasma I used to be strictly in the Plasma camp. Now I am not too sure.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:25:44 PM EDT
Plasma's don't do well unless you have them in a very dark room. Too much glare.

I just bought 450 LCD TV's for our schools - one per classroom. Plasma looked terrible with all the glare.

Av.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:30:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Atencio:
I'm waiting to see if the Mitsubishi Laser DLP lives up to all its hype.
Between LCD and Plasma I used to be strictly in the Plasma camp. Now I am not too sure.


There's different DLP technology out right now. Samsung (maybe others) have LED bulbs that last 100 fold longer and are "instant on" unlike typical incandescant bulbs in most DLP's. I stumbled upon a Panasonic DLP with LiFi technology on sale at Worst Buy last year for $997 (normally $1799) and snatched that up, later to find out just how much better the LiFi tech is than standard DLP bulbs. My TV weighs like 70lbs and couldn't be more than 18" deep. I love it.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:31:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By evo462:

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

There is NO reason NOT to buy a 1080p monitor at this point. IMHO, 720p and 1080i have a limited lifespan. They are on the WAY OUT already. Don't get sucked into their pricing.


Pbsh...whatever. I challenge you to tell the difference between a 1080i input and a 1080p input on anything smaller than 40".

Also, pretty much every HD source from a satellite/cable provider is *1080i* not 1080p, you'll need a Bluray player to get that 1080p signal you claim is far superior.

For me and the 32" LCD I bought for my bedroom, it was absolutely NOT worth the extra $250 for the 1080p TV vs the 1080i/720p TV that will probably never have a Bluray player hooked up to it.

I have a 56" 1080p TV in my theater room, and it looks absolutely spectacular on 1080i. It might look a bit sharper with a Bluray player hooked up to it, but I honestly couldn't imagine it look much better after seeing some with Bluray players hooked up to the at Best Buy and the like...



Just watch a race.......................anything with fast motion.

Also, the PS3 has a BluRay in it.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:32:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

Originally Posted By evo462:

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

There is NO reason NOT to buy a 1080p monitor at this point. IMHO, 720p and 1080i have a limited lifespan. They are on the WAY OUT already. Don't get sucked into their pricing.


Pbsh...whatever. I challenge you to tell the difference between a 1080i input and a 1080p input on anything smaller than 40".

Also, pretty much every HD source from a satellite/cable provider is *1080i* not 1080p, you'll need a Bluray player to get that 1080p signal you claim is far superior.

For me and the 32" LCD I bought for my bedroom, it was absolutely NOT worth the extra $250 for the 1080p TV vs the 1080i/720p TV that will probably never have a Bluray player hooked up to it.

I have a 56" 1080p TV in my theater room, and it looks absolutely spectacular on 1080i. It might look a bit sharper with a Bluray player hooked up to it, but I honestly couldn't imagine it look much better after seeing some with Bluray players hooked up to the at Best Buy and the like...



Just watch a race.......................anything with fast motion.


That's all about refresh rate, not LCD vs Plasma. I've never seen any pixelation out of a quality LCD TV. Seen it on plenty of crappy ones.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:33:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 5:33:15 PM EDT by evo462]
double tap
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:41:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By evo462:

There's different DLP technology out right now. Samsung (maybe others) have LED bulbs


Those are supposed to have very nice pictures. The Mitsubishi uses red, blue, and green lasers instead of bulbs. The picture according to the press releases is supposed to seriously blow away plasma and LCD. Supposed to have 1.8 times the color gamut of typical LCD's.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:42:04 PM EDT
I need something soon. I am running a PS3 through my old 27 inch from the turn of the century.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:44:34 PM EDT
There is a little bit of discussion of plasma vs lcd in this thread
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=714208
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:49:58 PM EDT
LCDLCDLCDLCD
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:16:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BIGMITCHBAKER:
I was about to buy an LCD until my son threw a set of keys which hit my PC moniter and now i have a large crack that appears when i turn it on.

So are the LCD TVs just as easy to damage? Do they have a protective lens or something?

Is this gas recharging stuff i hear about plasma TVs true?


Gas recharging stuff about plasma is a myth. They've been reliable for years now.

Plasma TVs have a glass surface about that's probably about as easy to break as a pane of glass. You'll want to transport them upright so the weight of the glass doesn't break it if you hit a big pothole or something. They're typically much heavier than LCD and use more power. LCD will have a punchier, brighter and vivid picture in brightly lit rooms, but plasma really looks incredible when the lights are low.

I have a plasma.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:16:45 PM EDT
LCD. Samsung!
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:48:48 PM EDT
The general rule of thumb I figured out, when I was shopping around, was this.

If you intend to have a dedicated home theater setup, with a room specifically set aside for it, with controlled lighting, for watching movies, you'll probably get more out of plasma.

For "looser" viewing, where the TV may be in a well lit room, or you may leave it paused for twenty minutes while you cook dinner, or you may play games on it or something, LCD is probably better for you.

I don't know where DLP fits in there. If there's a longevity benefit to it (5 years is the company line for both LCD's and plasma's), I'm not too worried, since the depreciated price of a direct replacement for my TV in 5 years will be considerably less than I paid the first time. I don't know enough otherwise about DLP to say anything, except family members have DLP TV's, and I've not at all been impressed by how fast they turn on.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:53:10 PM EDT
LCD
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:55:07 PM EDT
love my plasma the picture seems why brighter then lcd's i have looked at
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:01:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 9:01:32 PM EDT by JBlitzen]
I've only seen a few store TV's that had their brightness configured properly for the well lit store. I'm thrilled with my LCD's brightness, and I've never seen a brightness problem with plasma's or DLP's in homes. They just never look right in stores.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 11:50:52 AM EDT
plasmas are also power hogs. use about twice as much power as an lcd

it is really up to you on what you like and what your budget allows

there are pros and cons for both
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