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Posted: 9/21/2005 9:00:02 PM EDT
What does 140mph winds do to a house?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:01:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Your off to see the Wizard.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:01:55 PM EDT
I feel perfectly safe...
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:02:49 PM EDT
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:03:24 PM EDT
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:03:36 PM EDT
I always wondered why the City I live in (Outside of Fort Worth) required Hurricane ties on the superstructure.

Now I know
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:03:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Wolf, straw, you know the story.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:06:35 PM EDT
Anything over 100 mph you dont want to mess with. It will wreck your shit and if you get stuck outside...
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:06:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?




Depends on a number of factors....


My home survived 130 mph with only shingle damage. My rental home (3 miles away) took $11,000 in damage. Trees/falling branches can mess your home up quickly.

Oh yes, keep in mind that Florida homes have some of the strictest building codes that were enacted after Andrew. Those changes may be responsible for minimizing the damage.

If you're in the path of this storm, I'd leave.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:07:53 PM EDT
I hope your roof is attached very securely.


Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:10:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty



I'm a JBT. I've got food, water, ammo, etc. House isn't mine it's my roomies. Can't leave due to work.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:10:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Winds of 140 MPH are in the upper F2 range when it comes to tornadoes. An F2 tornado can toss cars. It can rip the roof clean off a well constructed home. It will damage a mobile home beyond recognition (literally). It will knock down walls on less than well built homes.

Now, consider a home is only exposed to a tornadoes winds for a very short period of time, usually for just seconds. Homes in the path pf this hurricane will experience these winds for hours.

Being that the home will be exposed to an equal amount of wind over a longer period of time, expect a well built home to lose it's roof and very likely some of it's walls.

That's just the wind damage. If you are vulnerable to storm surge, well then multiply the damage x10.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:10:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Your roof will be blown off if your windows get penetrated and broken. The new codes in Florida call for more nails for shingles and plywood. They have a decking nail called a ring-shanked nail that keeps the plywood down up to 150mph..but this does'nt take into account the Godawful gusts which can come from any direction, they can drop directly vertical and pound your house like a hammer. When that 100mph whine starts, it goes straight through your body like someone scraping their finger nails on a chalkboard. The wind does'nt stop..it just keeps pounding and pounding. You'll hear trees crack a fall with a thump on the ground. You hear branches and debris hit your roof, siding, windows it's amazing what will fly at 100mph. You also have to hear the pounding rain that is being driven by the wind..sounds like ball bearings hitting the house.

This storm is'nt a hurricane to be ridden through. It is a monster that is hungry and it will devour trees, houses, cars, fences, signs, lights anything that is standing that is made-made or God-made will go down.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:11:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Your off to see the Wizard.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:12:46 PM EDT
The local news just said the storm is the size of the GULF and getting worse
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:14:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Your roof will be blown off if your windows get penetrated and broken. The new codes in Florida call for more nails for shingles and plywood. They have a decking nail called a ring-shanked nail that keeps the plywood down up to 150mph..but this does'nt take into account the Godawful gusts which can come from any direction, they can drop directly vertical and pound your house like a hammer. When that 100mph whine starts, it goes straight through your body like someone scraping their finger nails on a chalkboard. The wind does'nt stop..it just keeps pounding and pounding. You'll hear trees crack a fall with a thump on the ground. You hear branches and debris hit your roof, siding, windows it's amazing what will fly at 100mph. You also have to hear the pounding rain that is being driven by the wind..sounds like ball bearings hitting the house.

This storm is'nt a hurricane to be ridden through. It is a monster that is hungry and it will devour trees, houses, cars, fences, signs, lights anything that is standing that is made-made or God-made will go down.




130 MPH took a complete eight foot section of my privacy fence and had it airborne for over 100 feet.

Don't even ask me about my storage shed.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:15:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.




Nope..not true. Shingles (30 year+) can withstand 70-80mph, decking can hold 110mph, but if the windows get penetrated, they'll be gone. My roof held 110mph from Opal, and 80mph sustained from Ivan.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:15:12 PM EDT
O..k..
What did you do
to piss off the
Big Bad Wolf ???

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:15:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



I'd suggest you not be in it when you find out.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:16:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Eyes melt... skin explodes... everybody dead....


Sorry... watching Repo Man again.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:16:33 PM EDT
Little pig, little pig let me come in...
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:17:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:20:28 PM EDT
two words
geodesic dome
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:23:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.




Nope..not true. Shingles (30 year+) can withstand 70-80mph, decking can hold 110mph, but if the windows get penetrated, they'll be gone. My roof held 110mph from Opal, and 80mph sustained from Ivan.



Agreed. We see 60-70MPH nearly every year with an occasional shingle lost.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:25:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty



I'm a JBT. I've got food, water, ammo, etc. House isn't mine it's my roomies. Can't leave due to work.



Dude go stay in an hotel at least you'll have concrete around you....
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:26:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.




Nope..not true. Shingles (30 year+) can withstand 70-80mph, decking can hold 110mph, but if the windows get penetrated, they'll be gone. My roof held 110mph from Opal, and 80mph sustained from Ivan.



In Florida building codes with PERFECT installation.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:26:45 PM EDT
I'm in the same boat as you, couldn't leave if I wanted to. Hurricane duty is a "normal" way of life in South Florida. Pack your duty back with plenty of changes of clothes, food, water etc. If you don't have shutters, but have the time, get some plywood and board up the window openings. Flying debris will shatter the windows, allowing air inside, next thing to go is your roof.

You might also want to take any important documents (ins., etc.) with you in a waterprrof container. If you are in a flood prone area you might want to move your computer and other electronics from the floor to somewhere higher. Other than that hunker down and hope for the best.

Oh yeah.....enjoy the light show if your out on the road. Pretty eerie watching the bright blue flashes on the horizon when the transformers blow from the water intrusion.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:27:25 PM EDT
You have one of them big liberty gun safes right? Lock yourself in it.


Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:35:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:
You have one of them big liberty gun safes right? Lock yourself in it.





That's a freaking brilliant idea as a last resort.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:36:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.




Nope..not true. Shingles (30 year+) can withstand 70-80mph, decking can hold 110mph, but if the windows get penetrated, they'll be gone. My roof held 110mph from Opal, and 80mph sustained from Ivan.



In Florida building codes with PERFECT installation.



And we now have the strictest codes in America. 6 nails per shingle, I think it's a nail every 6 inches on the decking. I had my roof re-done after Ivan and put in the new ring-shanked at about 4inches per..sometimes more. I also had the 40 yr. shingles and 30# felt. In the attic we doubled the bracing with 2x4's and 2x8'sd plus we use the new wood glue on every joist.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:56:07 PM EDT
1. The bad news: As of 12:35 AM CDT this early Thursday morning, Rita now has sustained winds of 175 MPH - the third worst storm on record.

2. The good news: You don't have to worry about 140 MPH winds any more.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:57:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:
The local news just said the storm is the size of the GULF and getting worse



Thats a big ass hurricane
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:15:53 PM EDT
I'm thinking that a guy could make a killing building poured wall concrete residential structures. Ever seen a parking garage torn apart by high winds?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:26:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



Your off to see the Wizard.



Plenty of room in Kansas. Try to land in the corner of a field, less driveway to pour that way.

Jim
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:28:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Social_Zombie:
two words
geodesic dome



Two words.

Golf Ball.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:34:23 PM EDT
im just glad they both missed me this time
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:36:54 PM EDT
Depends on what kind of house, and how close it is to water or the coast line. If you sit through 140mph in a house you will at some point say "i should have left"

The shingles are gone for sure, so it is going to rain in/ruin the ceilings. The house will hum and vibrate and howl like you hadn`t imagined, and you`ll think it won`t ever end. You will probly vow never to sit through one like that again.

If it isn`t brick i wouldn`t even think about it, i wouldn`t stay in my brick home again through something close to 140. Seeing as how you have to stay, i think i would get to one of the schools or somthing.

Power is going to be out for a long time.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:38:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 10:39:30 PM EDT by 22bad]

Originally Posted By gmtmaster:

Originally Posted By 22bad:
The local news just said the storm is the size of the GULF and getting worse



Thats a big ass hurricane



And so far it looks like it is going to bullseye Houston on saturday
we have good drainage on this side of town, I just hope the roof makes the trip
eta: or rather, I hope the roof DOESN'T take any trips
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:40:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:

Originally Posted By Social_Zombie:
two words
geodesic dome



Two words.

Golf Ball.




Yeah.

My desire for a partly underground home seems a better idea every day.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:10:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?




cleans the leaves outta the gutters.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:14:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:
What does 140mph winds do to a house?



If you get hit by anything over 100 you are in a lot of fucking trouble.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:15:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty



I'm a JBT. I've got food, water, ammo, etc. House isn't mine it's my roomies. Can't leave due to work.



Can you bunk down at work?

It's what most smart cops do.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:02:22 AM EDT
If you stay in your house for 140mph wind, make sure you can get back out.

Keep a saw ,hammer ,ax or whatever in case it comes down on you.


At that speed a lot of damage can come from pieces of your neighbors house hitting yours.

Try to to think safe.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:31:26 AM EDT
You are scared because of your "fight or flight" instincts. Use them. Since you can't fight a hurricane...... GTFO!

Seriously, guys. Everyone down there. Be smart. This is NOT macho time. (not saying that to anyone here specifically. I just mean in general.... concerned.)
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:41:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:

Originally Posted By Social_Zombie:
two words
geodesic dome



Two words.

Golf Ball.



+1!
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:55:49 AM EDT


This is a "get the hell out of Dodge" storm y'all. Don't bug-in with a CAT4 on the way, let alone a potential CAT5. Not much makes it through one this strong without some darn serious damage.

No joke. We live in a very robust concrete building here in FL. It was originally built by Army Corps of Engineers during the early days of the space program and is designed to survive hurricanes - CAT3 - but not CAT4, let alone CAT5.

Wooden house - leave. The structure might well make it but way too risky to be inside and find out "nope - it didn't make it this time". Roof not tied down with metal straps or cables to real masonry walls - leave. Windows not shuttered or boarded - leave.

Most of the time you'll come back to a mess to clean up but not much else. The problem with CAT3 or CAT4 though (even with a strong concrete structure) is the "nope - it didn't make it this time" syndrome.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 1:13:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Social_Zombie:two words
geodesic dome



two words. pressure differential
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:38:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By jadams951:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty



I'm a JBT. I've got food, water, ammo, etc. House isn't mine it's my roomies. Can't leave due to work.



Can you bunk down at work?

It's what most smart cops do.



Yeah...I'm going to head to my command station on friday.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:38:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jadams951:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Where are you? What precautions have you taken? Do you have insurance? Can you leave? Patty



I'm a JBT. I've got food, water, ammo, etc. House isn't mine it's my roomies. Can't leave due to work.







Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:53:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 9:01:07 AM EDT by FLGreg]

Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60. Most are gone at anything over 100.




Nope..not true. Shingles (30 year+) can withstand 70-80mph, decking can hold 110mph, but if the windows get penetrated, they'll be gone. My roof held 110mph from Opal, and 80mph sustained from Ivan.



In Florida building codes with PERFECT installation.



+1 on the good workmanship remark. I believe the FL Building Code calls for new houses to be built to withstand winds of 110 to 150 miles per hour depending on location. I'm 60 miles each way from the coasts and my house (built a year ago) is supposed to withstand a 110MPH storm.

Do a Google search for: ASCE 7-98 Windspeed Map for your particular state.

Oh, and to answer your question (Insert the storm of the week [here]):


Category One Hurricane:
Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). Storm surge generally 4-5 ft above normal. No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage. Hurricane Lili of 2002 made landfall on the Louisiana coast as a Category One hurricane. Hurricane Gaston of 2004 was a Category One hurricane that made landfall along the central South Carolina coast.


Category Two Hurricane:
Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt or 154-177 km/hr). Storm surge generally 6-8 feet above normal. Some roofing material, door, and window damage of buildings. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to mobile homes, poorly constructed signs, and piers. Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of the hurricane center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings. Hurricane Frances of 2004 made landfall over the southern end of Hutchinson Island, Florida as a Category Two hurricane. Hurricane Isabel of 2003 made landfall near Drum Inlet on the Outer Banks of North Carolina as a Category 2 hurricane.


Category Three Hurricane:
Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr). Storm surge generally 9-12 ft above normal. Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by battering from floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland 8 miles (13 km) or more. Evacuation of low-lying residences with several blocks of the shoreline may be required. Hurricanes Jeanne and Ivan of 2004 were Category Three hurricanes when they made landfall in Florida and in Alabama, respectively.


Category Four Hurricane:
Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr). Storm surge generally 13-18 ft above normal. More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows. Low-lying escape routes may be cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain lower than 10 ft above sea level may be flooded requiring massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 miles (10 km). Hurricane Charley of 2004 was a Category Four hurricane made landfall in Charlotte County, Florida with winds of 150 mph. Hurricane Dennis of 2005 struck the island of Cuba as a Category Four hurricane.


Category Five Hurricane:
Winds greater than 155 mph (135 kt or 249 km/hr). Storm surge generally greater than 18 ft above normal. Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 ft above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles (8-16 km) of the shoreline may be required. Only 3 Category Five Hurricanes have made landfall in the United States since records began: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, Hurricane Camille (1969), and Hurricane Andrew in August, 1992. The 1935 Labor Day Hurricane struck the Florida Keys with a minimum pressure of 892 mb--the lowest pressure ever observed in the United States. Hurricane Camille struck the Mississippi Gulf Coast causing a 25-foot storm surge, which inundated Pass Christian. Hurricane Andrew of 1992 made landfall over southern Miami-Dade County, Florida causing 26.5 billion dollars in losses--the costliest hurricane on record. In addition, Hurricane Gilbert of 1988 was a Category Five hurricane at peak intensity and is the strongest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record with a minimum pressure of 888 mb.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:55:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Shingles fly at 50 MPH. Decking goes at 60....



DAMN!

That is some fast moving house parts.

The deck should definitely be on the interstate headed out of town, especially if can travel at 60mph.

what kind of gas mileage does your deck get?

h.gif
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