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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/20/2004 2:09:21 PM EST
My cable company is offering an upgrade to 3 Meg (up from their standard 1.5 Meg service) for more money, I was told Windows tops out at something like 1.2 or 1.5 Megs. So what should I go with? Will the 3 Meg give me faster downloads or what. Thanks for any info.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:13:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By fireguy:
My cable company is offering an upgrade to 3 Meg (up from their standard 1.5 Meg service) for more money, I was told Windows tops out at something like 1.2 or 1.5 Megs. So what should I go with? Will the 3 Meg give me faster downloads or what. Thanks for any info.



I'm running about 380KB/s (a bit more
than 3Mb) and its fine. In fact, I have
100Mb LAN that works fine.

The bottleneck on the upward limit on
network bandwidth is the PCI bus, not
the OS.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:13:50 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:16:19 PM EST
Windows is not your limiting factor, even at gigabit x-fer rates.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:17:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:29:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/20/2004 2:29:55 PM EST by SNorman]
Windows "tops out" at 1.2 Mbit? Uhhh... OK. Now that I know this, I guess my 100MBit ethernet will downgrade to 1.2 Mbit.

The faster your Internet connection, the more likely you'll hit a bottleneck on the other side's Internet connection. For example, running 1.5 Mbit/sec Cable but you only get 10KB/sec download speed from a site. Their connection is slow. I can go to a Windows server in the datacenter and download from somebody with a fast connection (like Microsoft) at 800KB/sec (i.e. 8MBit/sec) and the bottleneck is still probably on our connection.

Link Posted: 8/20/2004 2:41:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:

Originally Posted By TheCynic:
Originally Posted By fireguy:

The bottleneck on the upward limit on
network bandwidth is the PCI bus, not
the OS.



PCI bus is 32 bits wide at 33 Mhz which 127.2 Mb/sec in theory. I routinely run video from my hard drive at 16 Mb/sec on my PCI IDE controller without even breaking a sweat. That's almost a T3 connectoin - it is 10 T1 connections worth of data.



Yeah. We ran into this problem at Nortel where
our VPN device, which was a glorified PC, could
not handle GigE rates because of the 127MB
PCI bus limit. Therefore, we had to go to a
completely new architecture. Of course, we lost
a fortune having to redesign everything and I
bailed out a few months before the development
team was laid off and the product was shipped to
Romainia for sustaining development.


Link Posted: 8/20/2004 3:15:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/20/2004 3:15:26 PM EST by AlphaBobRI]
I get 496KBps (or just under 5megabits per second) to all major web sites and I'm running WinDoz.

Older, non-XP, versions need to be tweaked. See DLSREPORTS and look for the 'tool' link on the left. You want to run the Tweak Test, which will tell you what you need to do to speed up things. On a Win-ME system, it will almost double your download rate, if your cable company is supplying it to you quick enough.

To some extent it also will be impacted by your CPU speed. As a reference, my older 1Ghz box will top out around 3mbps, while a 2.4Ghz will keep up with 5mbps.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:39:27 PM EST
I have a 3MB conection and I have gotten up to 1MBps download speeds sometimes. I think it depends on some of your computer factors, but also depends on what condition the lines outside your house are in.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:48:38 PM EST
Operating system is not generally a network performance factor at least until you get into the range of 20-50MBytes/sec. Anything will handle a 10 megaBIT/sec connection just fine.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:01:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/20/2004 5:02:34 PM EST by Not_A_Llama]

Originally Posted By Paul:
PCI bus is 32 bits wide at 33 Mhz which 127.2 Mb/sec in theory.



125.9 MB/s, actually.

32 bits = 4 bytes
33*1x10^6 = 3.3x10^7 cycles/sec
~=1.32x10^8 bytes/sec
/1048576 byes/megabyte
125.885 MB/sec

It's all trivial, though, since actual throughput is much lower.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:12:13 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 7:28:43 AM EST
At the moment I'm using an old P3/751 MHz laptop - 100 MHz front side bus - 512MB 100 MHz SDRAM - running XP/SP1 on a cable system.

I usually exceed 1MB/Sec download speeds. I just downloaded the full XP SP2 (266MB) in 244 seconds (1.08 MB/Sec - 1116 KB/sec transfer rate.)

I also ran a speed test on the speakeasy network.

2004-08-21 11:34:09 EST: 8596 / 921
Your download speed : 8802999 bps, or 8596 kbps.
A 1074.5 KB/sec transfer rate.
Your upload speed : 943396 bps, or 921 kbps



Link Posted: 8/21/2004 8:33:06 AM EST

My cable company is offering an upgrade to 3 Meg (up from their standard 1.5 Meg service) for more money, I was told Windows tops out at something like 1.2 or 1.5 Megs. So what should I go with? Will the 3 Meg give me faster downloads or what. Thanks for any info.


You were told this by someone who does not have any idea what they are talking about, 3Mb services don’t come close to the top end performance possible with Windows or anything else for that matter.

The real limiting factor with a 3Mb service is the servers you are accessing out on the Internet. When you do find servers with enough bandwidth to serve a 3Mb connection it is amazing how fast stuff downloads. But even when doing downloads from bandwidth limited servers the nice thing about 3Mb on your end is you can connect to several different servers and do different downloads at once and still get fast speeds.

If the cost difference is not too great the 3Mb will be worth it BUT ONLY if you download a lot of LARGE files. If you don’t download a lot of large files 1.5Mb is more than enough for surfing the Internet.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 8:50:55 AM EST
I only pay 29/mth for 3MB DL / 256K Up...???

How much is it elsewehere???

MT
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 8:55:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 8:56:15 AM EST by Max_Mike]

I only pay 29/mth for 3MB DL / 256K Up...???

How much is it elsewehere???



That is pretty cheap in most places 3Mb will run $45 and up.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:05:20 AM EST

I only pay 29/mth for 3MB DL / 256K Up...???

BTW, no DSL or Cable provider is offering 3MB service. I've see a few ads from Charter and BellSouth that lie about that. It's an exaggeration by a factor of eight.

I just setup my great-nephew's computers on Charter 3Mbps service, and it doesn't "feel" any faster than his old 128kbps ISDN when downloading web pages. The latency is greater with the cable so when you download lots of little images from web sites, the latency rather than the capacity dominates. Of course, when he downloads a file, it is very fast. Most of the work he does is via telnet sessions, so the cable is annoyingly slower than his old 128kbps ISDN. He switched because BellSouth jacked-up the prices on ISDN again.

$29/month is a great price. He's paying $15 per month for the first year and will be charged "an unspecified amount" (yes, they actually have that phrase in the contract) after that.z
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:10:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 9:11:26 AM EST by warlord]
fireguy: How much are you paying per month for your connection?
I'm So. Cali-fornia, I'm with Adelphia Cable, my connection speed is to 3 Mbps-down and to 256 Kbps-up according to their website for $40/month. Adelphia has recently started new service with 4 Mbps-down and 512 Kbps-up for $60/month. But as always the actual speeds can vary due to traffic & equipment.

I have an AMD 2100 CPU & Windows XP, and I can download at 3.3 Mbps on fast days, and on slow days down to 56Kbps.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:12:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:

PCI bus is 32 bits wide at 33 Mhz which 127.2 Mb/sec in theory. I routinely run video from my hard drive at 16 Mb/sec on my PCI IDE controller without even breaking a sweat. That's almost a T3 connectoin - it is 10 T1 connections worth of data.



Only if you have a very old PC. Current PCI bus rates of 66MHz and 100MHz are common, and many workstation and server class systems have 64-bit PCI slots.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:13:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:That's almost a T3 connectoin - it is 10 T1 connections worth of data.


A T3 is 28 T1s.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:25:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 9:26:57 AM EST by Max_Mike]

BTW, no DSL or Cable provider is offering 3MB service. I've see a few ads from Charter and BellSouth that lie about that. It's an exaggeration by a factor of eight.

I just setup my great-nephew's computers on Charter 3Mbps service, and it doesn't "feel" any faster than his old 128kbps ISDN when downloading web pages. The latency is greater with the cable so when you download lots of little images from web sites, the latency rather than the capacity dominates. Of course, when he downloads a file, it is very fast. Most of the work he does is via telnet sessions, so the cable is annoyingly slower than his old 128kbps ISDN. He switched because BellSouth jacked-up the prices on ISDN again.



There is no exaggeration here about Charters 3Mb service here; latency is also not a problem. I consistently get download speeds 50 to 100 times dial-up. There is no way his 3Mb cable connection should feel like ISDN there is some other problem. I suspect the connection to his house.

For downloading web pages 3Mb will not feel that different but when downloading a 200mb file the difference is amazing.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:30:07 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 9:31:31 AM EST by warlord]
Here is a comparision chart from Aldephia website:
(sorry no link because you have to be subscriber to access this page)


How Speeds Affect What You Do

Following are examples of how speed affects the time it takes to complete common tasks on the internet:

Sending an email with 2 Mb file attachment(s) (e.g., video clip, audio file, digital photos, etc.)
- 56K Dial-up: over 5 minutes
- 128 Kbps upload: 2 minutes
- 256 Kbps upload: 1 minute
- 512 Kbps upload: 30 seconds

Uploading 20 medium-quality (e.g., 500 Kb each) digital photos to a website
- 56K Dial-up: almost half an hour
- 128 Kbps upload: 10 ½ minutes
- 256 Kbps upload: 5 minutes
- 512 Kbps upload: 2 ½ minutes

Downloading a typical MP3 audio song (5 Mb)
- 56K Dial-up: 13 minutes
- 1.5 Mbps upload: <30 seconds
- 3 Mbps upload: <15 seconds
- 4 Mbps upload: 10 seconds

Uploading or downloading a 5 minute, high-quality digital video clip (37.5 Mb when recorded at 1-megabit per second)
- 56K Dial-up: Over 1 ½ hours
- 128 Kbps: 40 minutes
- 256 Kbps: 20 minutes
- 512 Kbps: 10 minutes
- 1.5 Mbps: 3.3 minutes
- 3 Mbps: 1.7 minutes
- 4 Mbps: 1.3 minutes

Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:35:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 9:39:12 AM EST by Andreuha]
is that 3 megaBIT or megaBYTE?
If it's bits, TAKE IT. If it's bytes, only take it if you do ALOT of downloading or hosting, because I've honestly very rarely came across servers which even let me download at one megabyte.

Edit to add:
My ISP used to kick ass before alot of people signed up. I remember downloading from Microsoft at nearly 3 megaBYTES per second... Nowadays I think I'm capped at 10megabits down/1 megabit up.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:49:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By Andreuha:
is that 3 megaBIT or megaBYTE?
If it's bits, TAKE IT. If it's bytes, only take it if you do ALOT of downloading or hosting, because I've honestly very rarely came across servers which even let me download at one megabyte.

Edit to add:
My ISP used to kick ass before alot of people signed up. I remember downloading from Microsoft at nearly 3 megaBYTES per second... Nowadays I think I'm capped at 10megabits down/1 megabit up.



What? Do you have a partial T3 or something?
10 Mb would allow you to transfer at over a MB
per second. A T1 connection is only 1.54 Mbs...

Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:52:29 AM EST
I am paying for 700 kps
and getting 500 kps currently under a business connection cable hook up is that good ?
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:54:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By TheCynic:

Originally Posted By Andreuha:
is that 3 megaBIT or megaBYTE?
If it's bits, TAKE IT. If it's bytes, only take it if you do ALOT of downloading or hosting, because I've honestly very rarely came across servers which even let me download at one megabyte.

Edit to add:
My ISP used to kick ass before alot of people signed up. I remember downloading from Microsoft at nearly 3 megaBYTES per second... Nowadays I think I'm capped at 10megabits down/1 megabit up.



What? Do you have a partial T3 or something?
10 Mb would allow you to transfer at over a MB
per second. A T1 connection is only 1.54 Mbs...




No, I live in NYC and have Cable. ISP is Optimum Online.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:54:37 AM EST

Originally Posted By Lightning_P38:

Where did you work at Nortel? RTP? I worked at Nortel several years ago (DMS and Meridian products), office was in Richardson.



I worked on the Contivity VPN product in
Boxboro / Billerica. I started just after NT
purchased Bay. First two years were
awesome as we were still kindof a startup
(beer on tap, free food, pool table, etc).
Then it all went to shit when corp found out
that we were having fun and being productive.
Corperate bitches. I hope I have that kind
of opportunity again.

Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:57:32 AM EST
Windows is slow and bloated, but I can still get 50 Mb/s around my home LAN on bulk transfers.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:59:42 AM EST

Originally Posted By Andreuha:

Originally Posted By TheCynic:
What? Do you have a partial T3 or something?
10 Mb would allow you to transfer at over a MB
per second. A T1 connection is only 1.54 Mbs...




No, I live in NYC and have Cable. ISP is Optimum Online.



Damn. I thought that the upward limit
on cable was like 5Mbs. You've got a
good thing going there.

Link Posted: 8/21/2004 11:09:16 AM EST
my 1.5 hi speed dsl is $60 dollars a month. :|

but it ends up turning out to be $65 dollars.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 11:21:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 11:21:36 AM EST by Andreuha]

Originally Posted By TheCynic:

Originally Posted By Andreuha:

Originally Posted By TheCynic:
What? Do you have a partial T3 or something?
10 Mb would allow you to transfer at over a MB
per second. A T1 connection is only 1.54 Mbs...




No, I live in NYC and have Cable. ISP is Optimum Online.



Damn. I thought that the upward limit
on cable was like 5Mbs. You've got a
good thing going there.




Nope.. I got my cable modem before they shipped them pre-capped. It's a Motorolla SB4100, with 38mbps symmetrical up/down.

I used to get REALLY good speed out of it, and I mean REALLY good speed. Now I've got a mixture of ISP-side speed reduction and a router with 3 computers on it, which further reduces speed. No complaints, though. I just downloaded Asherons Call 2 to check it out off of Gigex.com- Average speed was around 5500kbps. Not what I could be getting, but still pretty good by any standard
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 11:22:54 AM EST
all I know is I just got this on DSLreports.com

2004-08-21 16:25:01 EST: 2419 / 239
Your download speed : 2477982 bps, or 2419 kbps.
A 302.4 KB/sec transfer rate.
Your upload speed : 245453 bps, or 239 kbps.


that any good ?
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 11:46:06 AM EST
I'm using a five year old Gateway PII 450MHz machine with 256MB of RAM and have a Charter 3Mb cable connection going through a Linksys router with Windows 98 as the OS.

When I upgraded from the 2Mb they had before, I actually saw a drop in speed for a few days until I made a huge deal about it with their "customer service" people. After a few tweaks on my computer and them doing whatever the hell it is they did, my speed went back up. Checking my speed on various test sites, my nominal download speed is around 2.7Mb/s and when downloading files I usually do so at around 200Kb/s. Sometimes faster, sometimes slower depending on the server I'm connecting to.

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