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Posted: 9/17/2009 2:17:43 PM EST
Was that handed out like candy, or was it really earned?
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:18:53 PM EST
You should be proud, but I wouldn't begin every conversation with the fact.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:20:05 PM EST
I would be very proud if I were you.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:22:09 PM EST
http://usmilitary.about.com/library/milinfo/navawards/blbronzestar.htm

Eligibility Requirements

Awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Armed Forces of the United States, distin­ guishes himself/herself on or after 7 December 1941 by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight.

(a) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;

(b) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or

(c) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

To justify this decoration, accomplishment or performance of duty above that normally expected, and sufficient to distinguish the individual among those performing comparable duties is required, although less than the requirements for the Silver Star or Legion of Merit. Minor acts of heroism in combat or single acts of merit or meritorious service in connection with military or naval operations may justify this award.

The recipient must be in receipt of Imminent Danger Pay during the qualifying period.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:23:11 PM EST
depends upon if he was an officer or not........
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:24:28 PM EST

The fact that he served and was a part of the greatest generation is reason to be proud enough in my opinion!


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:24:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By Gunwritr:
depends upon if he was an officer or not........

No, Sgt. on a mortar crew.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:24:44 PM EST
My grandfather has one but he won't tell me what he did to earn it.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:25:05 PM EST

Originally Posted By raysheen:

The fact that he served and was a part of the greatest generation is reason to be proud enough in my opinion!



This.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:25:39 PM EST
From what I've read over the last 50 years it wasn't until the VN war that Bronze Stars were sometimes awarded by roster, for successfully showing up at formation 3 days in a row.


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:26:19 PM EST
I'm extremely proud that my Dad served in WWII. He died when I was 11 so I didn't really understand the sacrifice that generation gave to ensure the freedom of basically most of the world.

They were all heroes.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:26:47 PM EST
You should wear it around your neck like Mr. T
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:29:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By capnrob97:
Was that handed out like candy, or was it really earned?

I can't personally vouch personally, but I have heard older WW2 and korean vets complain about how they seem to hand out medals and ribbons more liberally now than they did then. I've heard this as long as 20 years ago.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:31:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By MadnessReigns:

Originally Posted By capnrob97:
Was that handed out like candy, or was it really earned?

I can't personally vouch personally, but I have heard older WW2 and korean vets complain about how they seem to hand out medals and ribbons more liberally now than they did then. I've heard this as long as 20 years ago.

I have heard the same.

Oh well, at least Dad fought in WWII at the Bulge and other spots in Europe.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:34:22 PM EST
This is an excerpt from the Army's Instutute of Heraldry website:

"As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders."

http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Awards/BRONZE%20STAR1.html

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:36:56 PM EST
What the fuck is a 'minor act of heroism?
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:37:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By Gunwritr:
depends upon if he was an officer or not........

No, Sgt. on a mortar crew.



I'm reading a book right now that was written by a WWII Sergeant of a mortar crew.

- Sergeant Don Malarkey -
(Band of Brothers fame)

So, yeah - sounds to me like he did good.


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:39:27 PM EST
No, back then you actually had do something above and out of the ordinary to earn a medal, not just do what you are supposed to and try to rescue a fellow troop.

My Great Uncle Dorce Hickok got a silver star in the Spanish American war, for rallying his pinned down unit to charge a machine gun nest in a church the spaniards set up in Cuba. He was the bugler and stood up under fire to blow charge and rushed the church causing his units members to do the same. Nobody even knew he recieved it until he died and they cleaned out his things and found it with the citation in a scrapbook. Actually have a photo of him in the late 1800's version of a dress blue army uniform.

The medals like candy thing did not really start until Vietnam.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:39:39 PM EST
WW2 and Korea Bronze Stars were a good bit tougher to earn than in later conflicts. Generally, there was some specific action the recipient made, to earn the award. Keep in mind, many units were much stricter than others in award criteria. It was not uncommon at all for CMH recommendations to be downgraded to a Silver Star, and SS down to BS. It could well be your dad was written up as SS, but had it downgraded to BS. But even if not, I think it is still something to be proud of.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:39:59 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:41:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By Gunwritr:
depends upon if he was an officer or not........

No, Sgt. on a mortar crew.

EARNED in that case.



5sub
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:43:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By joker581:
CIB & CMB Conversion
As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall's support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Star_Medal

If you got a CIB or CMB in WWII, you got a Bronze Star. Many others were awarded for various acts of merit or valor, but a WWII Bronze Star alone isn't neccessarily an indicator of anything extraordinary.


Only if retroactive after 1947. OP, was the BS awarded prior to 1947?

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:44:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By Silesius:
You should wear it around your neck like Mr. T



Dammit - dont do that when I am at work. The guy in teh next office popped his head in to see why I started giggling like a girl...
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:45:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Slufstuff:
Originally Posted By joker581:
CIB & CMB Conversion
As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall's support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Star_Medal

If you got a CIB or CMB in WWII, you got a Bronze Star. Many others were awarded for various acts of merit or valor, but a WWII Bronze Star alone isn't neccessarily an indicator of anything extraordinary.


Only if retroactive after 1947. OP, was the BS awarded prior to 1947?


Don't know, my brother got it and the paperwork, I will check next time I see him.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:48:41 PM EST
C'mon really,..... Having a dad that served in WW2 is enough to brag on, let alone the Bronze Star.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:50:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By MadnessReigns:

Originally Posted By capnrob97:
Was that handed out like candy, or was it really earned?

I can't personally vouch personally, but I have heard older WW2 and korean vets complain about how they seem to hand out medals and ribbons more liberally now than they did then. I've heard this as long as 20 years ago.

I have heard the same.

Oh well, at least Dad fought in WWII at the Bulge and other spots in Europe.


He may have known my grandfather then. Grandpa was awarded a bronze star, but I we have no idea what it was for.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:51:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 2:52:07 PM EST by Lightning_P38]
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:55:20 PM EST
I wouldn't brag about it, but I would be proud.
My dad served at one time, never talked to any of his kids about it and I only know because his sister slipped up and said something about when my dad was serving in Germany.
For all I know he could have metals... Bragging make you sound spoiled.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:56:10 PM EST
Brag in what sense? Be exceptionally proud of,hell yes! To use to introduce him on thrown in random conversations,probably not.

My dad was awarded a silver star and bronze star with V in Korea.Both have one hell of a lot of meaning.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:56:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 2:58:07 PM EST by theskuh]
Grandfather received the bronze star in WW2. He was also shot in the chest and blown up twice. He took one purple heart but never talked about the bronze star. I will ask family if they know why he received it. He also survived a mob hit while working for the feds after the war. He died two years ago. Tough ass bastard he was.

I will always remember him rubbing his gunshot wound on the doorway when it rained.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:57:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I wouldn't brag about it, but I would be proud.
My dad served at one time, never talked to any of his kids about it and I only know because his sister slipped up and said something about when my dad was serving in Germany.
For all I know he could have metals... Bragging make you sound spoiled.

I was the poster child of spoiled brat.

I got better.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:57:38 PM EST
My dad has a silver star and 2 purple hearts from Vietnam, he was a specialist , who run a bulldozer, and cleared jungle, but the metals weren't for clearing jungle.

From what he has explained to me, which is just about all he remembers, and what I read on the citation, he was hit from behind by a mortar round, while running and messed his left leg up bad (no knee in left leg, and wears a brace on it today) he was there on the ground, and wouldn't let the medics look at him, until they checked on the guys in his tent, which I think was possibly hit too. According to the citation, he could have saved several lives, although he doesn't know, if he did or not.

Still says to this day, If the damn officer in charge wouldn't have set up the NDP(night defensive perimeter) in a old abandoned firebase, the VC, wouldn't have had the damn place zeroed

He doesn't think he did anything special, just something anyone would do, but I always look to him, and I'm proud of him.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:58:38 PM EST
My Grandfather never said a word about his, I had no idea what he had done till after he died and we found a copy of the citation in a box of papers.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:58:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I wouldn't brag about it, but I would be proud.
My dad served at one time, never talked to any of his kids about it and I only know because his sister slipped up and said something about when my dad was serving in Germany.
For all I know he could have metals... Bragging make you sound spoiled.

I was the poster child of spoiled brat.

I got better.

You sound like it.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:59:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By Gunwritr:
depends upon if he was an officer or not........

No, Sgt. on a mortar crew.

By today's standards, then he probably earned it, and it would be something worth bragging about.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:59:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By 5subslr5:

Originally Posted By capnrob97:

Originally Posted By Gunwritr:
depends upon if he was an officer or not........

No, Sgt. on a mortar crew.

EARNED in that case.



5sub


This
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:01:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 3:13:53 PM EST by Yossarian]
Originally Posted By GI-45:

Originally Posted By raysheen:

The fact that he served and was a part of the greatest generation is reason to be proud enough in my opinion!



This.



+2.

I would tear up watching Black Sheep Squadron thinking about what those guys did and went through. I love em those guys for what they gave me.

And if I were you I would be proud to have a dad who served in WWII (I'm not saying you are not either, just emphasizing).

Hell, he's not my dad and I'm damn proud of him.

Edit: duh...
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:02:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By Fireguy3:
No, back then you actually had do something above and out of the ordinary to earn a medal, not just do what you are supposed to and try to rescue a fellow troop.

My Great Uncle Dorce Hickok got a silver star in the Spanish American war, for rallying his pinned down unit to charge a machine gun nest in a church the spaniards set up in Cuba. He was the bugler and stood up under fire to blow charge and rushed the church causing his units members to do the same. Nobody even knew he recieved it until he died and they cleaned out his things and found it with the citation in a scrapbook. Actually have a photo of him in the late 1800's version of a dress blue army uniform.

The medals like candy thing did not really start until Vietnam.


The Silver Star was not established until the Act of Congress of 19 July 1918. On 19 July 1932, the Silver Star replaced the previous "Citation Star" which was also established in the same Act of Congress - a silver star that was placed on the awardee's campaign medal for the war / campaign in which the citation was awarded retroactively back to the Civil War.

Your uncle could have only been retroactively recieved the Silver Star after 19 July 1932 to replace a previously awarded Citation Star (after 19 July 1918) based on a citation for bravery in dispatches from a general officer's headquarters.

Citation Star

The Citation Star was an award of the United States Army which was first established by the United States Congress on July 9, 1918. The Citation Star was a silver star device pinned to the World War I Victory Medal to denote those who had been cited for extreme heroism or valor. The decoration was made retroactive as an attachment to all service medals back to the American Civil War.

General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, in a letter dated February 26, 1926, wrote:

The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations."

In 1921, Army Regulation 600-40 specified that the Citation Star would be worn above a campaign clasp on the ribbon of the service medal for service which a citation had been given. When displayed on an award ribbon, the Citation Star would be worn before service stars.

The service medals which were authorized for the Citation Star include:

World War I Victory Medal
Civil War Campaign Medal
Indian Campaign Medal
Spanish Campaign Medal
Philippine Campaign Medal
China Campaign Medal
Mexican Service Medal
On July 19, 1932 the United States Secretary of War approved the Silver Star to replace the Citation Star. For those who had received several Citation stars, oak leaf clusters were authorized for the Silver Star.




Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:03:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 3:09:20 PM EST by omega62]
You should be very proud of your father's service in World War II.

As for "bragging," I personally consider it poor form. The word has kind of a negative connotation.

Solemn respect seems a better way to honor such veterans.

My 2 cents.

You asked.

ETA: I had an uncle who won the Silver Star in the Korean war. He got it by running out into a field and exposing himself to enemy machine gun fire so he could drag a wounded lieutenant back to safety.

He always said that the reason he did this was not because he wanted any medals.

It was because he just couldn't stand listening to the wounded officer screaming anymore.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:05:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By omega62:
You should be very proud of your father's service in World War II.

As for "bragging," I personally consider it poor form. The word has kind of a negative connotation.

Solemn respect seems a better way to honor such veterans.

My 2 cents.

You asked.

I know, I wouldn't brag about it, I should have said 'been proud'.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:06:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By joker581:
CIB & CMB Conversion
As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall's support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Star_Medal

If you got a CIB or CMB in WWII, you got a Bronze Star. Many others were awarded for various acts of merit or valor, but a WWII Bronze Star alone isn't neccessarily an indicator of anything extraordinary.


If you think being a combat infantryman or combat medic in WWII wasn't extraordinary... well, I won't say it.

Being an infantry Joe in the front lines during the coldest winter (1944/45) was more than 80%+ of the people on this site have ever done. The Bronze Star is awarded for "meritorious service" in a combat zone. You want to denigrate the meritorious service of those brave men, you do it without me.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:07:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By raysheen:

The fact that he served and was a part of the greatest generation is reason to be proud enough in my opinion!




This
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:07:47 PM EST
Brag? No. Be proud of? Absolutely.

My dad's dad was a Sergeant with his own heavy weapons squad (machineguns, FTW) and won a silver star and two bronze stars for actions that would impress even videogamers. He also got purple heart when a Mauser round went right into his helmet, chopped a notch out of his ear, and exited the back.

His men said he was the bravest man they ever knew and I'm very proud of him. My mom's dad didn't win any medals, but he still did a lot of different things vital to the war effort and I'm extremely proud of him as well.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:10:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By GI-45:

Originally Posted By raysheen:

The fact that he served and was a part of the greatest generation is reason to be proud enough in my opinion!



This.



Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:15:27 PM EST
Be very very proud of him.... I am sure he desrved it!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:16:16 PM EST
that's definitely something to be super proud of!
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:18:14 PM EST
My grandfather had two.
Unfortunately he had a Purple Heart for each though

Lost him last winter.
God Bless the Man.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:34:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 3:35:11 PM EST by Hebrew_Battle_Rifle]
Just showing up in uniform is not "enough"of a reason to consider someone a hero or to take pride in their service. There were lots of folks like Corporal Umpom in the military. I knew two in the MARINES.

I know that during Operation Praying Mantis, Bronze Stars were awarded for Mickey Mouse "accomplishments" that should be sources of embarrassment for the recipients.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:37:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hebrew_Battle_Rifle:
Just showing up in uniform is not "enough"of a reason to consider someone a hero or to take pride in their service. There were lots of folks like Corporal Umpom in the military. I knew two in the MARINES.

I know that during Operation Praying Mantis, Bronze Stars were awarded for Mickey Mouse "accomplishments" that should be sources of embarrassment for the recipients.

Thanks, and there were no photoshop pics in this thread.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:38:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By BBossman:
You should be proud, but I wouldn't begin every conversation with the fact.


He can brag but you can't.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:41:23 PM EST
Originally Posted By Element94:
C'mon really,..... Having a dad that served in WW2 is enough to brag on of an honor, let alone the Bronze Star.


+1

(hope you don't mind the minor revision)

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