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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/2/2002 8:10:34 AM EDT
I haven't had time to post since I got home last Friday, too much running around. I'm home on my 10 days leave after boot camp. It's the best feeling in the world. Boot camp is only as hard as you make it. Unless you are weak minded, anyone can do it. They say the Marine Corps marksmanship program is the best in the world and I believe it now. I now know I can consistently hit a man at 500 yards with an M-16A2. I shot high Expert, 235 out of 250 possible points. It's good to be back for a few days. Any questions just ask away.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:12:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:12:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2002 8:15:34 AM EDT by Citabria7GCBC]
congrats! though its not the USMC, that i will be going to, what advice do you have on making PT at the USAFA (when i go there) a little more easy? i do have a personal trainner getting me physically fit to marine corps standards. and i have also lost lots of weight and have gotten stronger! but still anything or any tips would be great.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:12:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:21:27 AM EDT
Way to GO Cypher214. WOOO HOOO.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:27:47 AM EDT
Next I'm going to Infantry Training Batallion, Camp Geiger, Camp Lejeune, NC. After 6 weeks of infantry training I'll go to my first permanent duty station; where that will be I don't know yet. As far as making PT easier... Just keep a positive mental attitude, that will help you with many things. I remember many times laying in a puddle of my own sweat doing pushups for IT (Incentive Training) and telling myself it was making me stronger, it wasn't just a punishment. You have to find good in it even when you're hurting. "Pain is temporary; Pride is forever." When I went in I was 223lbs. and was really hurting after running a mile and a half. Now, I'm a little under 200 (I have a large frame) and 3 miles is no sweat. The USAF's PT is nothing compared to the USMC (no offense or anything). They build you up. They don't expect you to show up and be able to do 100 pushups, run 10 miles, and lift a howitzer above your head. For us it was a gradual buildup. By the last week the majority of my company could run the O-course in under 50 seconds. Look around online and you should be able to find what the obstacles are like. Just remember what you went in for and let that motivate you.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:29:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:29:43 AM EDT
Congrats Cypher....I am proud to hear you made it, and had a great time doing so.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:32:55 AM EDT
OOORAH, DEVIL DOG!!! Congrats on earing your eagle, globe and anchor. I have a good buddy that was a Marine, and I know it's quite an acheivement to get through it! M@
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:34:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cypher214: Next I'm going to Infantry Training Batallion, Camp Geiger, Camp Lejeune, NC. After 6 weeks of infantry training I'll go to my first permanent duty station; where that will be I don't know yet. As far as making PT easier... Just keep a positive mental attitude, that will help you with many things. I remember many times laying in a puddle of my own sweat doing pushups for IT (Incentive Training) and telling myself it was making me stronger, it wasn't just a punishment. You have to find good in it even when you're hurting. "Pain is temporary; Pride is forever." When I went in I was 223lbs. and was really hurting after running a mile and a half. Now, I'm a little under 200 (I have a large frame) and 3 miles is no sweat. The USAF's PT is nothing compared to the USMC (no offense or anything). They build you up. They don't expect you to show up and be able to do 100 pushups, run 10 miles, and lift a howitzer above your head. For us it was a gradual buildup. By the last week the majority of my company could run the O-course in under 50 seconds. Look around online and you should be able to find what the obstacles are like. Just remember what you went in for and let that motivate you.
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no offence taken. the Airforce is more Brains than muscle. (no offence) so i figure by training to the USMC standards, (trainers husband is a Marine) then i get the best of both worlds. dont get me wrong, i know ya'll are smart too. anyway, thanks for the advice!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:35:21 AM EDT
Congrats!!!! [beer] Make us proud!!!!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:43:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cypher214: Next I'm going to Infantry Training Batallion, Camp Geiger, Camp Lejeune, NC. After 6 weeks of infantry training I'll go to my first permanent duty station; where that will be I don't know yet.
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Congratulations. If anyone tells you not to bring your wallet/money to the field, don't listen to them.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:44:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By oneshot1kill: [b]Semper Fuc*ing Fi Cypher214!!![/b] Becoming a Marine is one of the greatest feelings in the world especially when you go home on leave after boot camp and you are just on fire. When I got out of boot camp, I was so motivated, and proud to be an American fighting man. It's an incredible accomplishment and an even better feeling inside knowing that you belong to a brotherhood who's history predates the USA and was instrumental in securing our freedom before the politicians took it away. Congrats, be proud and represent the Corps in a proper manner. BTW, when you complete school and get stationed with your unit, don't let the negative attitudes of some Marines get you down, it is nothing like boot camp and depending on your unit, many of the Marines will seem like sh*tbirds, just do your thing and stay motivated, screw the sh*tbirds who want to get out after a year and have no discipline any more. This poor attitude by my platoon NCO's really caught me by surprise and got me down a little, I guess I was just into the whole idea of being a lean mean green amphibious monster and Esprit De Corps. Good luck my brother.
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I'd like to echo every word of OS1K's post; he said it all very well. Welcome to the family. I'm very happy for you that you're as proud of your accomplishments as I was when I came home on boot leave. When you get to your duty station, find a Lance Corporal or Corporal who looks like they know what they're doing and emulate them. The best advice I got as far as making a good impression and pushing your potential is to always act like the best Marines of the next higher rank. In other words, if you're a PFC, find the most squared away Lance Corporal and work like him, PT like him, be squared away like him. Eventually, the Staff Sergeant will be treating you like a LCpl, and your pros and cons will reflect. It'll be a matter of, "PFC Cypher has been doing a Lance Corporal's job and carrying himself like a Lance Corporal since he got here. We damned sure ought to promote him as soon as possible so he gets paid as a LCpl." Keep your drinking under control. I saw a lot of otherwise outstanding Marines brought low by overindulgence and the poor decision making that almost always follows. Again, welcome to the family, brother. If you ever have any questions, feel free to email me directly and I'll be happy to tell you what I know. Semper Fidelis Jeff
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:45:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2002 8:48:51 AM EDT by PFC_Kramer]
first welcome to the brotherhood! 2nd ..stay away from Lejeune for a duty station...anywhere but here! seriously.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:55:07 AM EDT
CONGRATULATIONS!!!![beer]
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 3:10:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
Originally Posted By oneshot1kill: [b]Semper Fuc*ing Fi Cypher214!!![/b] Becoming a Marine is one of the greatest feelings in the world especially when you go home on leave after boot camp and you are just on fire. When I got out of boot camp, I was so motivated, and proud to be an American fighting man. It's an incredible accomplishment and an even better feeling inside knowing that you belong to a brotherhood who's history predates the USA and was instrumental in securing our freedom before the politicians took it away. Congrats, be proud and represent the Corps in a proper manner. BTW, when you complete school and get stationed with your unit, don't let the negative attitudes of some Marines get you down, it is nothing like boot camp and depending on your unit, many of the Marines will seem like sh*tbirds, just do your thing and stay motivated, screw the sh*tbirds who want to get out after a year and have no discipline any more. This poor attitude by my platoon NCO's really caught me by surprise and got me down a little, I guess I was just into the whole idea of being a lean mean green amphibious monster and Esprit De Corps. Good luck my brother.
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I'd like to echo every word of OS1K's post; he said it all very well. Welcome to the family. I'm very happy for you that you're as proud of your accomplishments as I was when I came home on boot leave. When you get to your duty station, find a Lance Corporal or Corporal who looks like they know what they're doing and emulate them. The best advice I got as far as making a good impression and pushing your potential is to always act like the best Marines of the next higher rank. In other words, if you're a PFC, find the most squared away Lance Corporal and work like him, PT like him, be squared away like him. Eventually, the Staff Sergeant will be treating you like a LCpl, and your pros and cons will reflect. It'll be a matter of, "PFC Cypher has been doing a Lance Corporal's job and carrying himself like a Lance Corporal since he got here. We damned sure ought to promote him as soon as possible so he gets paid as a LCpl." Keep your drinking under control. I saw a lot of otherwise outstanding Marines brought low by overindulgence and the poor decision making that almost always follows. Again, welcome to the family, brother. If you ever have any questions, feel free to email me directly and I'll be happy to tell you what I know. Semper Fidelis Jeff
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Welcome Aboard!!! Above is some of the best advice that you will ever receive. I will also extend the offer to email me directly if you have any questions. I spent my last 6 years at MCAS New River which is attached to Camp Geiger, so on the rare occasion when you get some liberty if you need to know where a good place to eat or the like is located just ask. You are going to become intimate with the area around Verona as a "Geiger Tiger". Don't expect to sleep under a roof very often while you are there. Don't let the cab drivers rip you off!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 3:25:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 3:27:06 PM EDT
Well done.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:24:05 PM EDT
Congrats!!!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:30:18 PM EDT
Congratulations on becoming a Marine, did the lobotomy hurt?
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:41:44 PM EDT
Congrats Bro. Semper Fi ALWAYS! MOS 2531, Camp Pen/Okinawa 81-84 Take no Shit!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:53:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By PFC_Kramer: ..stay away from Lejeune for a duty station...anywhere but here! seriously.
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Camp Lejeune is the Marine Corps, what the hell are you talking about????
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:03:40 PM EDT
Congratulations!! We have the best fighting force in the world and you are helping to keep it that way.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:09:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By PFC_Kramer: first welcome to the brotherhood! 2nd ..stay away from Lejeune for a duty station...anywhere but here! seriously.
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Been to The Stumps or Fuji yet?
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:13:44 PM EDT
Congratulations. You'll do our country proud. [marines]
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:20:58 PM EDT
Congratulations Cypher and [b]THANK YOU[/b] for making the decision to serve your country. God bless. [marines]
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:32:50 PM EDT
I wish you the best and hope you hold that proudness through your time. You are now a member of the Armed Service. Understand it don't matter Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine. The only time it does is in the bar. Under fire we are all one and work has a team. We never leave our own behind. We take care of those who came before and who will come after. It is more than just Hell Week. It is a sense of pride from the heart that no one and I mean no one will ever take away from you. Cypher214...I am proud of you. I back you 110% and will carry you if ever needed. If your family ever needs anything you send ME an e-mail and I will tell you if I can do something. Trust in your team but believe in GOD. What do you want to be in the Marines. How do you want your future to proceed. Special field or training. Remember not all are Special Forces. You my friend might be heading to Baghdad or even Pakistan. You will keep your ears open and your head down. Your decision for live now involves those of your team remember that. Trust in you and trust in God That's all I can say GRUNT. I am proud of you for this position you are in. I swear I wish I was there with you and had the physical ability to do it,..GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY Please stay safe
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:58:02 PM EDT
Congratulations Cypher214! My son is also USMC and if your parents are like me they couldn't be prouder of what you have accomplished. One of the best days in my life was watching my son graduate boot camp and become a [b]UNITED STATES MARINE[/b]. It's something you will always be and no one can take it from you. Semper Fi
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 7:10:40 PM EDT
Welcome to the family Devil Dog!. Reality check, Boot Camp is like sex. The feeling only lasts so long. You will see living examples of this when you get to the fleet. Avoid the sea lawyers and shit birds. Be your own man. Give the Corps the best you have. When it seems like the Corps is not giving you it's best, put those feeling aside and give more. You don't realize it now but if you give anything less, when you are an old fart ex-Marine you will be ashamed of yourself when you look back on your time in the Corps. I am still in contact with a few guys I served with. The slackers all have deep regrets and attribute their behavior to the ignorance of youth. You are a Marine. Don't ever be embarrassed to walk, talk and live your life like a Marine. Embrace the culture, use the lingo, learn the history because now it's your family history. I suggest you read up on the history of the Marine Corps because it is the history of our republic and your new family. Read "With the old breed at Peleliu and Okinawa" by Eugene Sledge. It will give you a graphic look at the life of a combat Marine. Read "Flags of our fathers " by James Bradley. Semper Fidelis is not just our motto, it's a way of life. Never embarrass or let down the family.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 7:59:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2002 8:02:31 PM EDT by DvlDog]
Sukebe was able to verbalize what i have held inside for years. welcome to the family cypher. when you get off the island youre locked and cocked and when you you reach your first duty station you will be shocked by some of the NCOs and salty LCpls. dont let it get you down. keep pressing your cammies everynight (unless you got the new ones) keep your wall locker squared away, dont be afraid to take initiative or take charge of group of fellow PFC or Lances when on working party etc. well actually if i think for a minute i could probably come up with a list culled from my own experience and that of my friends: 1. that girl at Toby's doesnt REALLY like you 2. gear adrift is not gear-a-gift, some shitbird will sell your kevlar at saigon sams for cab fare 3. the 203/SAW/240G is only cool till the first time you have to hump it 4. the Navy WILL lose your medical records, Xerox EVERYTHING and keep copies. 5.29-Palms is NOT the "Jewel of the Marine Corps" 6. its a proven fact: the farther from home your duty station the happier you are in the Corps. if youre from NJ and get stationed at Lejuene you will be UA because you got pulled over or stuck behind an accident trying to go home for a weekend to bang high-school-suzy. guys who go to Okie never want to come home 7.WEST-PAC (trust me on this one) 8.Jacksonville NC just might be the asshole of the earth. get a laptop or take up literature and try not to venture out in town too often. 9. have fun. more opportunities for spontaneous adventure will present themselves to you during your junior enlisted years than any other time in your life. carpe diem 10. eat at the chowhall. on PFC pay Domino's to the barracks will send you to the poorhouse. 11. avoid the payroll deduction for savingsbonds. they're a bad deal. youre already contributing to your country by being a US Marine. let civilian suckers buy savings bonds. see a broker while on bootleave and open an IRA with a mutual fund. set up an allotment and you'll have a nice little nestegg when you get out. 12. DO NOT get married untill you are at least a Corporal or 24yrs old whichever comes first. thats all i can think of. i dont mean to sound preachy. just passing some knowledge.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:08:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cypher214: I haven't had time to post since I got home last Friday, too much running around. I'm home on my 10 days leave after boot camp. It's the best feeling in the world. Boot camp is only as hard as you make it. Unless you are weak minded, anyone can do it. They say the Marine Corps marksmanship program is the best in the world and I believe it now. I now know I can consistently hit a man at 500 yards with an M-16A2. I shot high Expert, 235 out of 250 possible points. It's good to be back for a few days. Any questions just ask away.
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Congratulations, Semper Fi Brother!!!! [marines]
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:09:03 PM EDT
as soon as you get to your permanent duty station, find your most highly motivated peers. prefferably the ones with loft career goals in the military, such as recon, ocs, ranger school, and things of this nature. keep each other motivated, and keep a friendly rivalry going. trust me it does absolute wonders to keep you on the right track, and eventually the higher ups will notice that your group is going somewhere in the corp and will help you get into the schools you want. some times just being around these friends can make you forget the shit birds and chicken shits are even there. congradulations on entering into the service of our great nation. (just because I am going into the army airborne doesn't meen I can't congradulate you on the corp) [:D]
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 3:22:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/3/2002 3:25:12 AM EDT by SgtKiwi]
Originally Posted By PFC_Kramer: first welcome to the brotherhood! 2nd ..stay away from Lejeune for a duty station...anywhere but here! seriously.
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LMAO... Spent my full four years there (less deployments). Cypher, once again, welcome to the ranks. You've earned it. I still remember it like it was yesterday. [b]GET ON MY F**KING QUARTERDECK!...LOUDER...LOUDER...LOUDER...[/B] And thast voice that a Marine Drill Instructor uses. They all seem to have "that voice". Good to Go Cypher. Now work on earning that blood stripe for the dress blues. edited to add: If you were like me and wore glasses while at Parris Island.. [b] You have a goofy tan line on the back of your head from the rubber strap[/b]. Nobody told me, had to learn it from a hot chick. Semper Fi, Ken
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 4:30:17 AM EDT
CONGRATIONS I've never been so proud of perfect stranger. Keep it touch.
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 4:30:38 AM EDT
Congratulations Cypher214.
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 5:04:06 AM EDT
Congrats...wish I had a time machine as I envy your acomplishment! Good luck in everything you do.
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 6:29:58 AM EDT
More great advice above from Sukebe and DVLDOG. As far as a reading list, I would recommend the following: "Making The Corps," by Thomas E. Ricks "Marine!: The Life Of Chesty Puller," by Burke Davis "The Root: The Marines in Beirut, August 1982-February 1984," by Eric Hammel "Force Recon Command," by Alex Lee "The Battle for Hue: Tet 1968," by Keith William Nolan "Grown Gray in War: The Len Maffioli Story," by Bruce H. Norton (anything by Major Bruce H. "Doc" Norton. He's a Vietnam era Force Recon Corpsman who became a Marine officer.) "The Bridge at Dong Ha," by John Grider Miller Just a few from my library, but a good place to start.
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 6:48:15 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22: When you get to your duty station, find a Lance Corporal or Corporal who looks like they know what they're doing and emulate them. The best advice I got as far as making a good impression and pushing your potential is to always act like the best Marines of the next higher rank. In other words, if you're a PFC, find the most squared away Lance Corporal and work like him, PT like him, be squared away like him. Eventually, the Staff Sergeant will be treating you like a LCpl, and your pros and cons will reflect. It'll be a matter of, "PFC Cypher has been doing a Lance Corporal's job and carrying himself like a Lance Corporal since he got here. We damned sure ought to promote him as soon as possible so he gets paid as a LCpl."
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That's good advice in the business world as well. Congratulations Cypher214. I know you're proud of yourself, and rightfully so. As a non-military man, I have nothing to offer but my congratulations and my thanks for your service. God bless you and keep you safe. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 6:59:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 10:36:45 AM EDT
Congratulations Cypher214! [):)] [50]
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 1:44:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2002 1:45:44 PM EDT by kpel308]
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 6:52:57 PM EDT
Congratulations young soldier. I'm very proud of you. Take care and thank you. Sincerely, -T.
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 7:33:51 PM EDT
Thanks for all the advice and compliments. I'm looking forward to doing my part to keep our country free. Millions of people have fought bravely and many have died to make our country what it is and someone has to be there to continue the fight if need be. It fills me with pride to know that if my country needs me I'll be there ready to defend her as part of the greatest fighting force the world has ever known. Saw a Marine Corps T-shirt recently that put it very well "USMC: Pray for Peace; Train for War".
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