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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/11/2005 3:29:00 PM EDT
I figure this board has a few intellectuals closer to there college chem days then I am who might be able to answer this question for me.

I am trying to figure out how much energy a hydrogen atom will generate in electrical terms when it is separated from its valance electron.

As in: electron taken off, bumped down a copper wire, and join back up with hydrogen at the other end of said copper wire. Basicly a fuel cell, how much amp, or watts or volts per mole of H2 are created.

I know how much energy it takes to separate the H2 from the O. ~ 65 W/h or 5.5 amps per hour with a 12 V battery with one Mole of water.

If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 3:33:54 PM EDT
why do u want to know? also, i believe it is spelled boolean
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 3:36:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:
I figure this board has a few intellectuals closer to there college chem days then I am who might be able to answer this question for me.

I am trying to figure out how much energy a hydrogen atom will generate in electrical terms when it is separated from its valance electron.

As in: electron taken off, bumped down a copper wire, and join back up with hydrogen at the other end of said copper wire. Basicly a fuel cell, how much amp, or watts or volts per mole of H2 are created.

I know how much energy it takes to separate the H2 from the O. ~ 65 W/h or 5.5 amps per hour with a 12 V battery with one Mole of water.

If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).



Why would the free electron flow if there was no receptors on the other end of the Cu? and what NRG would it take to break that bond w/o the possibiity of a chain reaction?
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 3:36:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Anteverius:
why do u want to know? also, i believe it is spelled boolean



I am just trying to figure out how much less energy the process of joining the hydrogen back with the oxigen and separating the electron makes then separating them in the first place.
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 3:37:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BlackDog714:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:
I figure this board has a few intellectuals closer to there college chem days then I am who might be able to answer this question for me.

I am trying to figure out how much energy a hydrogen atom will generate in electrical terms when it is separated from its valance electron.

As in: electron taken off, bumped down a copper wire, and join back up with hydrogen at the other end of said copper wire. Basicly a fuel cell, how much amp, or watts or volts per mole of H2 are created.

I know how much energy it takes to separate the H2 from the O. ~ 65 W/h or 5.5 amps per hour with a 12 V battery with one Mole of water.

If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).



Why would the free electron flow if there was no receptors on the other end of the Cu? and what NRG would it take to break that bond w/o the possibiity of a chain reaction?



Free electron flows from one end of the copper wire through a load to the ground (ie mother Ion or the Hydrogen in this case)
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 3:46:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By BlackDog714:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:
I figure this board has a few intellectuals closer to there college chem days then I am who might be able to answer this question for me.

I am trying to figure out how much energy a hydrogen atom will generate in electrical terms when it is separated from its valance electron.

As in: electron taken off, bumped down a copper wire, and join back up with hydrogen at the other end of said copper wire. Basicly a fuel cell, how much amp, or watts or volts per mole of H2 are created.

I know how much energy it takes to separate the H2 from the O. ~ 65 W/h or 5.5 amps per hour with a 12 V battery with one Mole of water.

If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).



Why would the free electron flow if there was no receptors on the other end of the Cu? and what NRG would it take to break that bond w/o the possibiity of a chain reaction?



Free electron flows from one end of the copper wire through a load to the ground (ie mother Ion or the Hydrogen in this case)



I don't believe in electron flow. I think the excited valence electrons bump and grind and that allows the transfer of energy. And many think that electricity is at the speed of light except for the resistance in the conductor. Boogus, I say. The time delay is because the valence electrons, during the transfer of energy, lock-up like dogs.
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 4:09:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaveS:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By BlackDog714:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:
I figure this board has a few intellectuals closer to there college chem days then I am who might be able to answer this question for me.

I am trying to figure out how much energy a hydrogen atom will generate in electrical terms when it is separated from its valance electron.

As in: electron taken off, bumped down a copper wire, and join back up with hydrogen at the other end of said copper wire. Basicly a fuel cell, how much amp, or watts or volts per mole of H2 are created.

I know how much energy it takes to separate the H2 from the O. ~ 65 W/h or 5.5 amps per hour with a 12 V battery with one Mole of water.

If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).



Why would the free electron flow if there was no receptors on the other end of the Cu? and what NRG would it take to break that bond w/o the possibiity of a chain reaction?



Free electron flows from one end of the copper wire through a load to the ground (ie mother Ion or the Hydrogen in this case)



I don't believe in electron flow. I think the excited valence electrons bump and grind and that allows the transfer of energy. And many think that electricity is at the speed of light except for the resistance in the conductor. Boogus, I say. The time delay is because the valence electrons, during the transfer of energy, lock-up like dogs.



Be that as it may, we still measure acording to Ohms law and Faradays rules, Amps is considered the flow of electrons, and you are splitting neutrons with your responce. Even if its just the pressure of one electron on the next creating the energy, we measure that in Amps.
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 4:20:50 PM EDT
Oy! My head hurts!
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 5:17:48 PM EDT
I love it when guys on this board geak out!
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 5:52:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:
If perhaps someone can dirrect me to a website with the formula for figuring it out (or hell just give me some ideas for search boolins (sp)).



If I'm understanding your question, and without trying to explain...

try googling along the lines of "fermi level" "conduction band" and "valence band"

You should find enough to read, and the basic functions that quantify separation and flow of electrons in electronics

Link Posted: 8/11/2005 6:10:36 PM EDT
Zero


I'm no electrochemist but I'm pretty sure if your cell consists of one half reaction, and then the same half reaction in reverse, you get no potential.
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 6:54:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By Anteverius:
why do u want to know? also, i believe it is spelled boolean



I am just trying to figure out how much less energy the process of joining the hydrogen back with the oxigen and separating the electron makes then separating them in the first place.



Can't be less energy - that would violate the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. I.e., you could make a perpetual energy machine, and Mother Entropy doesn't like that activity.
www.entropylaw.com/entropy2ndlaw.html
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 1:24:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AeroE:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By Anteverius:
why do u want to know? also, i believe it is spelled boolean



I am just trying to figure out how much less energy the process of joining the hydrogen back with the oxigen and separating the electron makes then separating them in the first place.



Can't be less energy - that would violate the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. I.e., you could make a perpetual energy machine, and Mother Entropy doesn't like that activity.
www.entropylaw.com/entropy2ndlaw.html



Actaully when a H2 and a o2 are joined back to gether it creates about 300MJ vice about 300KJ to separate them. But that usually comes in an explosion, not controlable energy. Though I supose you could use that as a combustion engine.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 1:52:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By AeroE:

Originally Posted By tmleadr03:

Originally Posted By Anteverius:
why do u want to know? also, i believe it is spelled boolean



I am just trying to figure out how much less energy the process of joining the hydrogen back with the oxigen and separating the electron makes then separating them in the first place.



Can't be less energy - that would violate the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. I.e., you could make a perpetual energy machine, and Mother Entropy doesn't like that activity.
www.entropylaw.com/entropy2ndlaw.html



Actaully when a H2 and a o2 are joined back to gether it creates about 300MJ vice about 300KJ to separate them. But that usually comes in an explosion, not controlable energy. Though I supose you could use that as a combustion engine.



Only if it's fitted with a Fetzer Valve.

Link Posted: 8/12/2005 2:15:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
Only if it's fitted with a Fetzer Valve.

skyjude.users.btopenworld.com/Images/Ballbearings.jpg



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