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Posted: 12/19/2016 7:58:24 PM EST
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.

Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:00:43 PM EST
It's a challenge but not impossible.

If you don't want the GD answers, you might want to move this post to the DIY Forum.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:01:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:02:55 PM EST
You could consider surface-mount wiring, which might avoid the necessity of doing work in the attic, but it would probably be ugly.


Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:04:00 PM EST
You could hire an electrician.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:04:21 PM EST
They make a thing you can stuff in the hole you cut to hang the ceiling fan, it extends between the ceiling joists. Technically it can be done from the bottom. But it is a pain. Running the power up to it will probably be the hardest part. Its all much easier if you can access it from the top
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:04:32 PM EST
If you can get the wire to where you need it with a pole or broom handle, all other work should be able to be done from the dining room. You will need to be able to get a wire from somewhere, anywhere, to the area. I have a remote on mine, so no wall switch was needed.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:05:15 PM EST
Getting power to the fan will be the biggest challenge. The rest is easy.

Running power to it is going to depend a lot on what you can access from the attic, or how much of the wall or ceiling you are willing to rip open.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:05:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.
View Quote



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an architect . . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:07:01 PM EST
At least you have attic access. There is hope!
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:07:24 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:08:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an [size=4]<font color="#1e84cc">architect </font></font> . . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


View Quote


Did I strike a nerve or something?

Who designs houses other than architects?
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:13:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/19/2016 8:13:56 PM EST by Bigger_Hammer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an "architect " . . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


View Quote


Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:14:24 PM EST
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Originally Posted By edb66:
You could hire an electrician.
View Quote

This would probably be your best option given the other issues you mention.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:16:20 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:17:00 PM EST
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.
View Quote

If you can get the power to it, you're just looking at cutting a hole where you want the fan and installing one of these:

http://www.westinghouselighting.com/lighting-accessories/light-fixture-accessories/support-braces-and-boxes/saf-t-brace,-3-teeth,-twist-and-lock-with-1-1-2-inch-deep-box-0110000.aspx

No need to even go in the attic.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:17:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By usmcmp:

This would probably be your best option given the other issues you mention.
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Originally Posted By usmcmp:
Originally Posted By edb66:
You could hire an electrician.

This would probably be your best option given the other issues you mention.


What kind of ballpark do you think for a ceiling fan install, needing power and the box mounted?

I don't mind installing the fan itself if he'll do the power and box.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:17:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:19:32 PM EST
You'll need enough access to your ceiling joists to hang a ceiling fan junction box which will hold the weight. 



Then you'll need to pull wire to power it. I'm pretty sure code would require the wiring to be run through conduit. Whether or not you'd need a wall switch depends on the fan unit and if both the fan and it's lights are remote controllable. If not, you'll need to pull wire to a wall switch. 

It's always fun doing 'redo' stuff. Stuff like this is totally easy on a new build, before the sheetrock is in the way. Good luck with it.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:19:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an <font color="#1e84cc">architect
. . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize</font> a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an <font color="#1e84cc">architect
. . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?



Lol... are you an architect? You seen really upset about that.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:21:41 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:


Did I strike a nerve or something?

Who designs houses other than architects?
View Quote

Wife and I designed our house, no blueprints, just a drawing on a piece of paper. Worked well as I helped with the construction.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:22:30 PM EST
It can be a lot of work if you have never done something like this before. Mounting the fan is easy. Running wire from a power source to fan and switch can be tricky. You can bet there will be obstacles in the ceiling and wall depending on where you want a switch.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:23:11 PM EST
if your hanging a fan work will need to be done from above...sure you can do it from below and eliminate going upstairs.
I would fire anyone wanting to hang a fan that way in my home.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:23:35 PM EST
Can you get access to the top of the room from the attic?

If so, you are WAY ahead of the game.


You will need to two things

(A) a way to Route power to the area and a switch to to control it (access from the ceiling makes this much much easier)

(B) a Support Box to hold the weight of the ceiling fan and keep it from falling through the sheetrock of the ceiling.

It will mount between the joists of the ceiling. Most are expandable to go in the hole you cut from the bottom, and then extend across to go end to end on the joists.





Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:23:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/19/2016 8:25:35 PM EST by dirtyboy]
If you don't mind the cord being visible, this is an easy job. Anchor the box to a stud, run wire, hang fan. Parents did this, used a chain to help hide the wire, mounted the control box on the wall, plugged the fan box in to outlet.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:25:20 PM EST
Start by removing all drywall in the room. Once you open up the walls and ceiling, the rest is pretty easy.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:29:32 PM EST
Before you tap into any existing power, add up the draw of everything else on that breaker and make sure you don't go over the rating.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:30:58 PM EST
I would install a battery operated model or maybe a wind powered one.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:32:23 PM EST
Easiest thing in the world to do...

Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:40:43 PM EST
Run an extension cord from the wall outlet up the wall and across the ceiling and staple in place.
Hardwire the fan into the extension cord and then paint the cord same color as the ceiling.

Ghetto fabulous.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:44:27 PM EST
Install it on the wall, opposite of an existing switch.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 8:44:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By edb66:
You could hire an electrician.
View Quote


Probably not a bad idea.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 10:49:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By czechsix:
Easiest thing in the world to do...

http://areainspectionservices.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/PorchFan.jpg
View Quote

Not when it's 16' in the air, I'd like to replace mine and when I do it will involve a Genie.  Just replacing the bulbs with a stepladder is sketchy enough.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 10:51:10 PM EST
If you have access from your attic it's fairly easy
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:15:59 PM EST
TXguy you should have known GD would have fun with this.

If you have decent attic access near the fan location, and a circuit near there that could handle a couple more amps, it would be a 200.00 job. Just get a fan with a remote and forget a wall switch.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:23:09 PM EST
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Originally Posted By cruze5:


Or just use wireless electricity
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I don’t know if you’re joking or not. I spent a fair amount of time at Hunter working on such a design. It would still require running electric up to the mounting location. It does make installation very easy.

Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:26:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an <font color="#1e84cc">architect
. . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dropdbombnow:
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize</font> a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.



Do you want to know . . . how I know . . . that an <font color="#1e84cc">architect
. . . did not actually design your domicile ? ? ?


Architects
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:30:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
My dining room has no overhead light. I think it's because there's a giant window there and the architect didn't realize a moody loner with assault rifles would eventually own the place.

If I want to install a ceiling fan, what am I looking at? I'm guessing I can just send power over from a wall socket, but what about physically installing it? The part of the attic over the dining room is pretty small, and I'm pretty not small, so I don't think I can do a whole lot up there.
View Quote
Do you have access about the ceiling?
You might want to reinforce the stud that you connect the junction box to. My father-in-law replaced a ceiling light with a ceiling fan. There are cracks in the ceiling now.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:32:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CTM1:
Run an extension cord from the wall outlet up the wall and across the ceiling and staple in place.
Hardwire the fan into the extension cord and then paint the cord same color as the ceiling.

Ghetto fabulous.
View Quote


I started laughing from the beginning. One step down from external race-track conduit.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:32:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
You'll need enough access to your ceiling joists to hang a ceiling fan junction box which will hold the weight. 

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/attachments/lighting-light-fixtures-ceiling-exhaust-fans/39303d1412353243-will-box-support-ceiling-fan-h177-retrofit-electrical-box-06.jpg

Then you'll need to pull wire to power it. I'm pretty sure code would require the wiring to be run through conduit. Whether or not you'd need a wall switch depends on the fan unit and if both the fan and it's lights are remote controllable. If not, you'll need to pull wire to a wall switch. 

It's always fun doing 'redo' stuff. Stuff like this is totally easy on a new build, before the sheetrock is in the way. Good luck with it.
View Quote



Not for residential that I've ever seen. Fishing wire sucks but a wall switch is a lot nicer.

If he has attic access above it a 2x4 will suffice for a mount as well.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:33:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Bigger_Hammer:
Can you get access to the top of the room from the attic?

If so, you are WAY ahead of the game.


You will need to two things

(A) a way to Route power to the area and a switch to to control it (access from the ceiling makes this much much easier)

(B) a Support Box to hold the weight of the ceiling fan and keep it from falling through the sheetrock of the ceiling.

It will mount between the joists of the ceiling. Most are expandable to go in the hole you cut from the bottom, and then extend across to go end to end on the joists.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/th/content_26/Q2_2010/c26-B00027EWNW-4.jpg
View Quote
Hmm, I wonder how long that junction box can hold the ceiling fan in my father-in-law's house. It's been awhile so I guess the junction box is pretty strong.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:36:11 PM EST
Do ceiling joists run perpendicular or parallel to the wall where you want to mount the switch? If perpendicular, and the switch location is roughly in line with room center, you can just fish tape up to the wall plate inside wall cavity, open up the corner drywall, chisel out a canal for wires, cover wire with metal tap in nail guards, then fish tape across to ceiling fan hole between the joints. Pretty simple.

If switch is a little off, maybe use an outlet in room that is roughly center then use a remote instead of s switch. Hang remote by door. Make sure the circuit can handle the additional fan service.

Both options will only require minimal drywall in corner, where ceiling meets wall, and won't require drilling/fishing blindly through studs or joints.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:39:15 PM EST
Look in the attic and see if there is any conduit near the areas you can get to.
It may be better to get an electrician to put in the box
After the box is in, any idiot can install the ceiling fan.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:40:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/19/2016 11:46:14 PM EST by Renegade13B]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dskeet:
Getting power to the fan will be the biggest challenge. The rest is easy.

Running power to it is going to depend a lot on what you can access from the attic, or how much of the wall or ceiling you are willing to rip open.
View Quote


This. The install is easy once you have the wiring in. Then all you have to do is install a ceiling fan bracket between the rafters and connect the fan.

I did it this summer, but the wiring was already present.

If you don't know much about electrical, it might be worth paying someone to get the wiring done. Also, be aware that you might need a permit depending on local regs.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:45:37 PM EST
Can you get into the space over the room where you want to mount the fan. If you can, it's easy. Cut two pieces of 2x4 so they fitt between the rafters. Another so it bridges the rafters. Glue
and screw the whole thing together. Drill a large hole for wires. Install what you just assembled so it hangs between two rafters. Drill holes and install fans. You'll have to hook up power from
somewhere. Done it many times.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:51:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By BigPapaColt:


Probably not a bad idea.
View Quote

They can coordinate with the carpenter. No big deal as long as you have money.
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 11:54:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 245PDG:

I don’t know if you’re joking or not. I spent a fair amount of time at Hunter working on such a design. It would still require running electric up to the mounting location. It does make installation very easy.
View Quote



sounds like they at Hunter kept you out of the "KNOW" wireless electricty is all the rage these days.
Link Posted: 12/20/2016 12:10:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/20/2016 12:13:30 AM EST by scottfire1957]
Amazingly, I have repaired/fixed/installed appliances without asking ARFCOM.

I bought books. Read them, used them as references. Still have them, though I might update some.

Youtube is also a great reference.

You ask here merely to garner attention to your inabilities; to show your liberal ineptitudes. YOU need a husband.



Edit: I need a reference book to show me emoticons on this newish site!
Link Posted: 12/20/2016 12:11:43 AM EST
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Originally Posted By scottfire1957:

You ask here merely to garner attention to your inabilities; to show your liberal ineptitudes. YOU need a husband.
View Quote


Are you applying?
Link Posted: 12/20/2016 12:14:29 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:


Are you applying?
View Quote


For what?

Link Posted: 12/20/2016 12:14:35 AM EST
Is there a hot & neutral in the switch box? If so than good. If not than finding a circuit just got a bit harder unless you get rid of the half-hot and rewire the switch wiring to be a hot, neutral and ground instead of a hot, switch leg & ground.

Can you get above the wall that the switch is in? A 14/3 will need to be fished down the wall to the switch box and than over to the fan box in the ceiling. You can use 14/2 if you don't want to switch the fan & light seperately. Verify that you are tying into a 15 amp ckt before using 14 gauge wire. 12 gauge may be necessary if it is a 20 amp ckt.

Do you currently have a single-gang box in the wall or a two-gang?

Do you want to change from a single-gang box to a two-gang so that you can have separate switches? If so than verify that you have enough hollow space to add a bigger box by removing the cover plate, pushing a long skinny screwdriver into the wall at an angle through the cut edge of the Sheetrock (that would be covered by the wall plate) & jiggling/feeling for obstructions. If no obstructions than remove the old box. Turn off the ckt, undue all of the wires/connections, remember/understand what all of the wires are for, cut out the old box, trace the new box opening on the wall, cut the bigger hole, fish the wire & install the bigger box.

Mount the fan to a solid, fan-rated box. The style others have mentioned works fine, especially ic you can't get above in the attic. I prefer screwing a piece if 2x4 between the two joists and than screwing a fan-rated pancake box to that. Make sure that you use a fan-rated box.

Hang the fan and install the switches.

If really is that simple...
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