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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/6/2001 10:33:04 PM EDT
I know this may be kind of a simple question, but I was never in the military and was never taught how to use a sling to help support a firearm. The only thing my father taught me about slings was to use it to carry your rifle over your shoulder. So, I am asking the experts..how do I use a sling in the prone and the sitting position? Usually their is one end that was a loop, does this loop go towars the front or the back? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks Sgtar15 [img=left]http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/mica/viper.gif[/img=left]
Link Posted: 4/6/2001 10:36:35 PM EDT
Quite a few variations possible, especially with tac slings. The most common is to weave your support arm between gun and sling past the elbow and bring the hand around behind the front swivel. This cinches the gun in tight for better support.
Link Posted: 4/6/2001 10:51:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2001 11:49:16 PM EDT by sgtar15]
So....Do you meen I put my left arm between the sling and the rifle, then wrap my left hand around the sling so that the sling is touching the back of the befind of my elbow and the front of my wrist? Also, how tight should it be> I assume it should just be snug...correct?? sgtar15 P.S. I know this is a crude drawing, but does a proper sling hold look like this? [img]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=891257&a=6484793&p=45955259[/img]
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 1:30:15 AM EDT
I assume you are asking about the 1907 sling. There is an excellent description on the Fulton Armory's FAQ. Have the rifle with you in front of the computer when you look at this. The priciples should be somewhat tranferrable to other sling types. Once you have gotton used to this sling, using a good example like the Turner (or Tam), there really is no substitute. Talk to any highpower type - 99% plus use this sling. Match rifle shooters use a variant, but it is not as versatile.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 1:57:06 AM EDT
1) If right handed - hold rifle in your right hand with sling hanging beneath the rifle. If left handed - reverse left and right in following steps. 2) Pass left hand and arm from left to right between sling and rifle. 3) Pass left hand back under sling from right to left. 4) Pass left hand back over sling and onto front handgaurd or stock - rest stock in left hand 5) Achieve firm stock weld with buttstock against right shoulder. 6) Draw left forearm to the rear to snug the sling and steady the rifle. Assume you know the rest from here for sitting and prone positions.... if not - will continue in later post. And don't squeeze the trigger - press it straight back - makes a world of difference! [sniper] The Sniper
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 2:23:06 AM EDT
Sniper..Thanks for the great info, that's exactly what I was looking for. Yes i would like more info concerning the prone and sitting positions, like the proper way to lay prone. Again..Thanks Sgtar15
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 5:33:37 AM EDT
sgtar15, You might also consider joining a local rifle club. Look for someone or a club that shoots CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program, formally known as DMC) matches. These guys know what you are seeking (sling use and positions [;)]). Traditional prone position is achieved by laying your body at an angle to the target. If you shoot right handed swing your body left. To find what angle, lay facing the target, holding the rifle at the target, and swing the rifle to your left. It just got more comfortable to hold, didn't it? Now duplicate that angle with your rifle pointing at your target. There are variations and somebody will probably say I'm not telling you the 'proper' way, but this will achieve what your looking for. Again, consider, at least watching, joining a club match. You'll learn lots and have fun.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 6:21:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pogo: I assume you are asking about the 1907 sling. There is an excellent description on the Fulton Armory's FAQ. Have the rifle with you in front of the computer when you look at this. The priciples should be somewhat tranferrable to other sling types. Once you have gotton used to this sling, using a good example like the Turner (or Tam), there really is no substitute. Talk to any highpower type - 99% plus use this sling. Match rifle shooters use a variant, but it is not as versatile.
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Ditto what Pogo said. Forget the rest and get the best! Using the loop and keepers will reduce the pulsing caused by your heartbeat also remember you don't move the rifle to the target you move your body until your position puts the rifle on the target.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 6:26:10 AM EDT
The main idea is to complete a closed triangle out of your hand-elbow-shoulder; this is much more stable than leaving the elbow free to flex. Jim Owens has a webwsite http://www.jarheadtop.com/ where he sells his books on highpower rifle competition. The book about the sling and shooting positions includes a (new to me) way of setting up the sling that eliminated a problem I had with the sling loosening during a string of rapid fire.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 7:17:23 AM EDT
The prone is a snap! Place the left elbow so it will be directly under the rifle, force the butt of the rifle into your shoulder, the relax into the sling and obtain stockweld. Feet can be apart (I usually keep my left leg aligned with the rifle);heels down; back straight; shoulders level with the ground. Just remember to adjust your body to the target so that you have a natural point of aim, otherwise you will end up forcing the rifle back on target against sling tension for every shot. As for sitting, I would have to say if you want to have a good consistant cross-leg position you ought to sit with your rifle and snap in for a while (we did this daily for about 8 weeks before shooting on Paris Island- with or without the rifle you were sitting in a cross-leg ). A proper cross-leg sitting position can become painful if you have not stretched your legs enough. I never had any luck with open leg positions, but they are more comfy from the get go. [url]http://www.jouster.com/articles30m1/slings.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 8:29:31 AM EDT
Forget the damn sling - us snipers in the Corps don't use slings to shoot - why should you? You obviously need to work on something else.... I didn't even use my sling on the KD range for my annual rifle quals - and I still never shot below 243... Slings are overrated... Would you really have time to properly use the sling in a real-life situation - NO! So train as such... out...
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 9:09:16 AM EDT
....and when going from the 300 to 600 you should low crawl in a manner in which you will not be detected.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 10:40:40 AM EDT
I am so damn poor the sling on my 10/22 is made from newspaper string.
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 5:17:53 PM EDT
Hey Sgtar15 Remind me next time we shoot together and I'll show you how to use the sling on my DCM rifle and you can try mine before you go spend your money. But if you're using your scoped AR from the prone, just stick with a bi-pod. If you are putting together a "tactical" AR upper, then the sling is only to hold the weapon when you aren't, not really as a support for shooting. Pthfndr
Link Posted: 4/7/2001 5:37:56 PM EDT
If using the 1907 sling disconect it from the rear of the weapon and find which holes make the best fit fot the position as follows (length will vary for different positions). With sling undone from rear of rifle place weapon, butt down and bottom of rifle facing towards your body. Grasp sling and rotate clock wise 1/2 turn. Place left arm through loop and pull loop up onto bicep. Pull keeper down to cinch loop on arm. Swing upper arm counter clock wise around sling and between sling and fore stock. If you can shoulder weapon in that particular postion with slack in sling, move to next set of holes that make sling loop shorter. I you cannot shoulder rifle because sling is too short, lengthen one set of holes. When done properly you will have to place/ squeeze butt stock into shoulder and you should be able to relax all arm muscles and rifle should remain in position. With slide sling with cammed keeper attach clip to front of rifle with cam keeper forming loop to rear but unattached to sling loop at butt. Again, 1/2 turn clockwise and procede as above. You can adjust this sling much quicker. With rifle shouldered adjust loop with right hand untill sling is tight. Notice location of cam keeper and take up 1 more inch.
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