Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 12/21/2003 11:12:45 AM EDT
I have this wireless internet camera; I don't know why, I guess just to play with. It works swell on my LAN but I haven't been able to allow anyone outside of my router\firewall to access it.

Anyone know what I need to do to allow access the camera? I have a Linksys wireless Internet video camera and a Linksys wireless router.

I haven't found anything that says just do this and this and it will work.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 11:20:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 11:22:58 AM EDT by FLGreg]
Install Mico$oft NetMeeting. I am sure someone else here will suggest a much better product to use but NetMeeting is already in your operating system if you have Windows 2000 or above.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 11:27:10 AM EDT
Net Meeting? That is a computer thing isn't it? This cam is it's own sever and isn't connected directly to a computer. I think what I need are instructions on router settings to enable access through the NAT firewall. I have no idea if that makes any sense but it sounds good.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 2:30:54 PM EDT
How do you access the camera on the lan? You will probably have to write a rule for the router firewall that will allow people to access that port.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 2:56:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 2:59:20 PM EDT by FLGreg]
OK.... So, there is an Ethernet port that your network cable plugs directly into on the camera? What is the make and model of the Web Cam and your router? You will need to find out what port the camera operates on and, as someone else said, configure a rule on your firewall to let the signal out. Do you have a static IP address from your ISP?
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 3:06:33 PM EDT
The camera has it's own internal LAN address, which can't be accessed directly if you aren't behind the firewall. That is my problem. I should be able to set the router to allow access but I haven't been able to do that. I don't know why there isn't a button that says "ALLOW ACCESS FROM THE INTERNET" for this device. Or something like that. Why does everything have to be so damn primitive?
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 3:16:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 3:25:00 PM EDT by Oslow]
Originally Posted By FLGreg: OK.... So, there is an Ethernet port that your network cable plugs directly into on the camera? What is the make and model of the Web Cam and your router? You will need to find out what port the camera operates on and, as someone else said, configure a rule on your firewall to let the signal out. Do you have a static IP address from your ISP?
View Quote
Actually, the camera is wireless, but yes it is a stand alone device. Linksys BEFW11S4 Wireless Router Linksys WVC11B wireless internet cam Camera port is (I think) 80 The router is set to "Obtain IP address automatically" Just adding the camera IP to the DMZ doesn't do it
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 3:43:54 PM EDT
Sounds like you want to forward port 80 to the camera. The options should be under advanced -> forwarding in the admin for the router.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 3:44:33 PM EDT
Port 80 is the standard port for a webserver. You will need to configure a pinhole through the router to the outside world for anyone not on your internal network. Do you have the [url=ftp://ftp.linksys.com/pdf/wvc11b_ug.pdf]User's Manual[/url] for the camera? And also for the [url=ftp://ftp.linksys.com/pdf/befw11s4ug.pdf]Router[/url]? Good Luck
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 4:05:26 PM EDT
PINHOLE Right
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 6:24:33 PM EDT
Also, some isp's block port 80 so that you can't set up a webserver.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 6:30:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By serrada: Also, some isp's block port 80 so that you can't set up a webserver.
View Quote
Ok, I guess that's why there is a way to set an alternate port. So if someone wanted to access the camera, what IP address would they use?
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 6:49:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 6:57:21 PM EDT by FLGreg]
Originally Posted By Oslow:
Originally Posted By serrada: Also, some isp's block port 80 so that you can't set up a webserver.
View Quote
Ok, I guess that's why there is a way to set an alternate port. So if someone wanted to access the camera, what IP address would they use?
View Quote
Since you have a dynamic IP address from your ISP you need to find out what it is for that day. Usually you are "leased" an IP address that changes once the lease "expires" or you log off or turn off the router. For that time period you have the same IP address. go to [url]http://www.whatismyip.com/[/url] to find out what it is right now. Did you read those manuals I gave you links too? They should have all of the info to get you set up. Edited to add - your router should have the external IP address and then it passes packets to and from each device on your internal network so the webcam should have that IP address too
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 7:00:25 PM EDT
I have the IP address of the router; I read through the manuals; I've tinkered around with the router settings. So if someone just types in the router address they should go directly to the camera? You don't have to add the port number or anything? That doesn't seem to be happening. Oh ,well, I suppose I'll get it sorted out eventually. I just didn't think it should be that difficult.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 7:05:03 PM EDT
Your wireless camera will be assigned an IP address by your router. Set your router to allow access to this IP address directly when accessed via outside the router, usually through the use of an assigned port. I have never done it, but I believe that's how it works.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 7:08:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 7:15:16 PM EDT by serrada]
If you can use port 80 it would be something like this: your ip: 12.34.56.78 http://12.34.56.78 If you had to change your port number to say 60, it would look like this: http://12.34.56.78:60 Edited to add: You may be able to do it with your DMZ host setting. Use the lan address of the camera. Try it with the camera set to port 80 and a different port like 60.
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 7:27:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2003 7:48:33 PM EDT by Oslow]
OK, but it doesn't work. It doesn't work if I have someone else try it; it doesn't work if I try the address from my computer. If I put in the address that the router says is the WAN address, it works from my computer but not from outside. Maybe it will work tomorrow. Thanks Edited to add: I thought putting device in the DMZ would allow access but that doesn't seem to be the case; thus the problem.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 12:26:10 AM EDT
the IP address that your router assigns to connections that it is managing are hidden from the outside world-- which is the purpose of a router... You have to access it using the IP that is assigned to your router from your ISP... When you acces this IP address over the internet, depending on what local IP addresses are mapped, your router will redirect incoming traffic to those internal connections... I believe if you use the DMZ settings it will be wide open to your camera-- not sure how secure your camera is, or if security is needed...
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 12:29:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 3:57:48 AM EDT
I put the camera IP address in the DMZ. I did the port forwarding thing (I tried this using the DMZ and without the DMZ) I can't access the camera using the routers external IP address. If I put the camera IP address in the DMZ and use the routers WAN IP address (from the router status page), I go directly to the camera. If I take the camera address out of the DMZ and use the router WAN IP address, I access the router; so that part seems to work. But, I still can't access the camera (or the router) using the external IP address and no one else can access anything with any address. Adding the port number to the external address doesn't work either. Maybe it just won't work.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:24:47 AM EDT
in the security tab (assuming a linksys router) do you have "Block WAN Request" disabled? If it is enabled it may not allow requests from the outside world into your local net. I'm not 100% certain on this, but it seems logical to me.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:49:43 AM EDT
in the security tab (assuming a linksys router) do you have "Block WAN Request" disabled?
View Quote
That is disabled, which means (I think) that Internet access is enabled. [whacko] I'm not going for a degree in computer science here, I just want to enable access to my camera. If I was building something like that I would put a switch on it - ON / OFF. I guess I may have to contact Linksys and see if any of their people know how to let their router access their camera.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 3:10:33 PM EDT
Let's try this again. Set your camera back to the default settings. I think it is port 80 and an ip address of 192.168.1.115. On the router clear the dmz settings and the port forwarding settings. Now add a new port forwarding setting as follows: port range: 2084 - 2085 protocol: both ip: camera's ip (192.168.1.115) click apply now to access, you should be able to type in your wan ip address (the one that does not start with 192) followed by a colon and the port number. ex. http://216.239.53.99:2084 Now the manual says that you need to have dhcp disabled. Whether this is actually needed for it to work is debatable. I think that they might have put this in here so that you don't forward to an ip that is not there. But, if it still doesn't work, you might have to set up your computer and camera with static ip addresses and then turn the router's dhcp off.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:34:46 PM EDT
The silly thing still won't work with the external address; I've tried it fortyleven ways. It still works swell on the LAN. I can hit the camera with what the router calls the WAN address if I have DMZ on; with the DMZ off, I access the router. So it seems that the port forwarding is not working and the DMZ alone won't allow access from the internet. As for shutting off the DHCP, I have 4 computers and a printer on the network. I'll fumble through that some day when no one is around. OR, maybe the whole thing is screwed up and will never, ever work in which case I have a nice internal security camera. Thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 10:33:09 AM EDT
With the port forwarding set up and DCHP disabled, I still can't access from the internet. Linksys has a webserver that is supposed to allow access to your camera, they give you a free setup to try it out. It doesn't seem to work. [rolleyes] But I was wondering if they made this hard to do so people would buy their sevice. Part of the problem is the manual: [b]Port forwarding can be used to set up public sevices on your network. When users from the Internet make certain requests on your router, they will be directed to the specified IP.[/b] What does "certain requests" mean? Why do they have to speak in code? Why not just say do this, this and this? I thought someone would say "yeah, I set one of those up last week, here is what you have to do".
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 10:47:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/23/2003 10:53:16 AM EDT by cluster]
man now I wanna we how the qauilty of this cam.. you ARE going to let us take a peek after this is all worked out.... right ? wow I cant believe a simple webcam has stomped the collective knowledge of ARFCOM!!!1 pst..! how many ARFCOM members does it take to hook up a web-cam? [:D] couldnt help it man ... IM feeling < toni the tiger > great today!
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 12:45:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 1:02:06 PM EDT
Ok, I learned something else today. I decided to set up a web server to test out my router and see if we are missing something. I have a d-link, but it should be similar( call it virtual server instead of port forwarding). Well, I use the ports that I gave you(2084-2085) and it doesn't work. Hmm, so now I try even numbers 1000,2000, still nothing. So I just come up with an insanely big number 32000, and it works like a charm. So, I start backtracking to see where this stops at. The magic number? 5000. Now here's what's weird about the whole thing. I'm on Cox cable. They openly admit to filtering ports 25,80, and 135. But, it seems that they are filtering 0-4999, or something close to that(I didn't go through and check all of the ports. It seems that they want to eliminate any kind of standard server from their home service. So you might want to use an insanely high port number.
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 1:03:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Troy: From the outside of your network, everyone will be hitting the same IP address whether they want web, FTP, or mail, but the router will determine what type of connection they want (i.e., "certain requests") by the port number they are requesting, and will route the request to the appropriate machine.
View Quote
Yeah, I think that is how it is supposed to work. Sounds good and I'm sure that in most parts of the universe it does work just that way. Right here and right now though, the stupid port fowarding has suspended operations.
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 1:08:33 PM EDT
[b] So you might want to use an insanely high port number.[/b] 32000? That's pretty high; how about 29999?
Link Posted: 12/23/2003 3:28:06 PM EDT
Geeeezzzz, I tried a bunch of ports; no luck. There must be something going on with my ISP that won't let this work. By the way, the picture is not that great with this camera unless you have a lot of light.
Top Top