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Posted: 8/3/2009 11:32:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:44:45 AM EST by XDBACKUPGUN]
Say a #10 bolt?




ETA: such as a #10X1.5 bolt
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:34:18 AM EST
By Nominal diamter are you talking about with or without the threads?
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:36:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:44:58 AM EST by XDBACKUPGUN]

Originally Posted By jdessell:
By Nominal diamter are you talking about with or without the threads?


With



Such as a #10x1.5
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:38:55 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:39:25 AM EST
What do you want to know, Major diameter, minor diameter, tap drill size?
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:40:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:41:41 AM EST by XDBACKUPGUN]

Originally Posted By patriotarmory223:
What do you want to know, Major diameter, minor diameter, tap drill size?


I can look all that up in a Machinery Handbook, I want to know the formula used to calculate the nominal diameter.


I cannot find the formula in my book.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:40:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:42:22 AM EST by Kuraki]
ETA I read wrong.

You want to know how to calculate the major diameter for a given thread so that you can turn it out of a piece of bar stock correct?
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:43:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:44:32 AM EST by XDBACKUPGUN]

Originally Posted By Kuraki:
ETA I read wrong.

You want to know how to calculate the major diameter for a given thread so that you can turn it out of a piece of bar stock correct?




I typed it wrong, should be a #10 not an M10.


I want to know the formula that calulates nominal diameter when you only know the # of the scew, I know such a formula exsists, just cannot find it in my Machinerys Handbook.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:44:57 AM EST
10 mm screw, 10 divided by 25.4=.3937 Major diameter is .3937
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:45:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:47:09 AM EST by Cole2534]
(Number X .013")+0.060"

Therefore (10 x 13) + .060 = .190"
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:46:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:47:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 11:47:47 AM EST by Kuraki]

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Kuraki:
ETA I read wrong.

You want to know how to calculate the major diameter for a given thread so that you can turn it out of a piece of bar stock correct?




I typed it wrong, should be a #10 not an M10.


I want to know the formula that calulates nominal diameter when you only know the # of the scew, I know such a formula exsists, just cannot find it in my Machinerys Handbook.

I know of no such formula. Whenever I've needed to know, I just measured a screw or looked it up in my book.


Hah, neat.


Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"

Therefore (10 x 13) + .060 = .190"


Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:47:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Now go cut me some metric threads on an American Lathe!

Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:49:03 AM EST
By looking at that chart the number grows by 1/ 64 with each increment.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:50:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Now go cut me some metric threads on an American Lathe!



You mean you cannot do that?



Link Posted: 8/3/2009 12:05:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Now go cut me some metric threads on an American Lathe!



You mean you cannot do that?



Not without changin gears in my old South Bend

Link Posted: 8/3/2009 12:10:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"

Therefore (10 x 13) + .060 = .190"
This sucks for 00 and 000 screws!

(For UMS, it's like this: d = 0.060" - (# x 0.013"), where # is the number of zeroes.)
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 12:13:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 12:24:29 PM EST by jteal]
i am required to go by the dimensions contained in bac5004-2.

Edited to clarify:

Boeing Proprietary info,

PERMANENT STRAIGHT SHANK FASTENER
INSTALLATION
BAC5004-2
BOEING PROCESS SPECIFICATION
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 12:58:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Now go cut me some metric threads on an American Lathe!



Didn't know that was difficult? IIRC, you only have to change one gear to go from a standard thread only lathe to a metric thread.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 4:54:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By machinisttx:
Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By Cole2534:
(Number X .013")+0.060"




That is it.


I did not write it down in my notes when the instructor talked about it, since he said it was in the Machinerys Handbook.



Thanks!



Now go cut me some metric threads on an American Lathe!



Didn't know that was difficult? IIRC, you only have to change one gear to go from a standard thread only lathe to a metric thread.
It's not. But it's more work than a 1/4-20.

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