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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 9/6/2010 12:12:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 12:12:41 AM EDT by marksman121]
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T



Also we can not have studded in CA.



Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:17:29 AM EDT
Blizzaks really have no (non studded) equal on snow and ice. If you're talking off road then the Dunlops will probably be fine. You can always get some Goodyear MT/Rs or Bridgestone MTs and have them siped to help out on ice and hard packed snow. Most tires intended for use in mud will clear themselves of snow pretty well too. My MT/Rs served me very well both on and off road in Iceland for several years. I did have the outer tread blocks siped but even before I did that they gripped very well.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:25:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 12:27:51 AM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
Blizzaks really have no (non studded) equal on snow and ice. If you're talking off road then the Dunlops will probably be fine. You can always get some Goodyear MT/Rs or Bridgestone MTs and have them siped to help out on ice and hard packed snow. Most tires intended for use in mud will clear themselves of snow pretty well too. My MT/Rs served me very well both on and off road in Iceland for several years. I did have the outer tread blocks siped but even before I did that they gripped very well.


Good to hear. I was hoping they would be similar to the snow tires. I really did not want to buy a set of 'winter only' tires along with a new 'regular' set. I wonder how the Dunlops would do on the packed snow/ice on the road though.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:26:12 AM EDT
You can't beat an actual snow tire for snow performance, but depending on what you need you may be able to find a AT/MT that's good enough. I just put on some Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors that will probably be good enough at everything I need them to do. But they probably won't see a repeat of last years "Snowmageddon" or do any real offroading either.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:28:31 AM EDT
On snow, any aggressive AT or MT will work fine. Snow is easy to drive through. On ice, the more edges to grip, and the softer the rubber, the better. This is why some people sipe their tires, as Chairborne previously mentioned. I've been running BFG ATs for the last 15 odd years on various trucks. They are great in the snow, and since I keep getting the stiffer tires, just OK on ice. The Blizzaks or Nokian tires are good on ice without studs.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:32:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 12:33:49 AM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By Prime:
You can't beat an actual snow tire for snow performance, but depending on what you need you may be able to find a AT/MT that's good enough. I just put on some Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors that will probably be good enough at everything I need them to do. But they probably won't see a repeat of last years "Snowmageddon" or do any real offroading either.



It will be about 70% packed snow/ice on the road during the winter and the rest getting through deeper stuff on the rural areas that don't get plowed. I was hoping to find a set of ATs that would be okay even if they were not as great as a real snow tire. I thought the Dunlop's tread pattern would be good in the powder and still be okay on the packed/ice. But I don't have experience with the tires past the stock ATs.

eta- Are larger 'gaps' in the pattern going to be a plus or minus on the ice?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:33:56 AM EDT
The biggest diffrence is the tire compound. A snow tire will give you better grip in snow/slush conditions. The snow tire will stay soft in the cold, a regular tire compound will get hard. I run snow tires in winter , there cheap insurance i guess.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:36:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tamas:
The biggest diffrence is the tire compound. A snow tire will give you better grip in snow/slush conditions. The snow tire will stay soft in the cold, a regular tire compound will get hard. I run snow tires in winter , there cheap insurance i guess.

By the time you drop a grand for another set of tires, and another $300 on rims, mounting, and balancing I wouldn't say it's "cheap" insurance. Car tires are much cheaper than truck tires, especially in something like blizzaks. I couldn't see running two different sets of tires so I found the best compromise I could, and the MT/Rs I had fit the bill well. Fortunately I don't have to worry about snow and ice in my present location.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:37:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By tamas:
The biggest difference is the tire compound. A snow tire will give you better grip in snow/slush conditions. The snow tire will stay soft in the cold, a regular tire compound will get hard. I run snow tires in winter , there cheap insurance i guess.


Can you guys use studded in PA? I have always wondered how much of a difference that makes over the non studded snow tires.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:38:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By tamas:
The biggest diffrence is the tire compound. A snow tire will give you better grip in snow/slush conditions. The snow tire will stay soft in the cold, a regular tire compound will get hard. I run snow tires in winter , there cheap insurance i guess.


Much truth here; I would add only that tire profile affects traction substantially on snow and ice. Love seeing the guys with mud-only, stupid-wide tires on the ice up here. They're easy to find in the ditches.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:40:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wunbadweel:
Originally Posted By tamas:
The biggest diffrence is the tire compound. A snow tire will give you better grip in snow/slush conditions. The snow tire will stay soft in the cold, a regular tire compound will get hard. I run snow tires in winter , there cheap insurance i guess.


Much truth here; I would add only that tire profile affects traction substantially on snow and ice. Love seeing the guys with mud-only, stupid-wide tires on the ice up here. They're easy to find in the ditches.

Super Swampers in snow=doh!
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:43:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Originally Posted By Prime:
You can't beat an actual snow tire for snow performance, but depending on what you need you may be able to find a AT/MT that's good enough. I just put on some Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors that will probably be good enough at everything I need them to do. But they probably won't see a repeat of last years "Snowmageddon" or do any real offroading either.



It will be about 70% packed snow/ice on the road during the winter and the rest getting through deeper stuff on the rural areas that don't get plowed. I was hoping to find a set of ATs that would be okay even if they were not as great as a real snow tire. I thought the Dunlop's tread pattern would be good in the powder and still be okay on the packed/ice. But I don't have experience with the tires past the stock ATs.

eta- Are larger 'gaps' in the pattern going to be a plus or minus on the ice?


Larger gaps and harder rubber(load range D or E) will be a hindrance on the ice. Those Dunlops look like they'll do OK––-have you checked the reviews on Tire Rack regarding their ice performance? For what you are talking about, any decent set of ATs would probably do as well. I've broken trail(been the first dude down a long dirt road) on a couple feet of snow with a 4wd Tacoma and BFG A/Ts. No issue with traction, the only possible problem I could have had was with the smaller and lighter vehicle getting clogged up with snow.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:50:18 AM EDT
You'll also have to consider fuel economy and road noise when looking at MTs. You'd probably be pretty well served with a good AT like the BFG AT KOs. I read a story on a 4Runner forum about a guy who pulled a UPS truck out of the ditch in snow on a set of Firestone Destinations, which are good tires, but not anything really special.
I'd suggest seeing if your vehicle has an online forum. Someone somewhere has already done this.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:51:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 12:52:14 AM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By FDC:
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Originally Posted By Prime:
You can't beat an actual snow tire for snow performance, but depending on what you need you may be able to find a AT/MT that's good enough. I just put on some Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors that will probably be good enough at everything I need them to do. But they probably won't see a repeat of last years "Snowmageddon" or do any real offroading either.



It will be about 70% packed snow/ice on the road during the winter and the rest getting through deeper stuff on the rural areas that don't get plowed. I was hoping to find a set of ATs that would be okay even if they were not as great as a real snow tire. I thought the Dunlop's tread pattern would be good in the powder and still be okay on the packed/ice. But I don't have experience with the tires past the stock ATs.

eta- Are larger 'gaps' in the pattern going to be a plus or minus on the ice?


Larger gaps and harder rubber(load range D or E) will be a hindrance on the ice. Those Dunlops look like they'll do OK––-have you checked the reviews on Tire Rack regarding their ice performance? For what you are talking about, any decent set of ATs would probably do as well. I've broken trail(been the first dude down a long dirt road) on a couple feet of snow with a 4wd Tacoma and BFG A/Ts. No issue with traction, the only possible problem I could have had was with the smaller and lighter vehicle getting clogged up with snow.


They sound good.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Dunlop&tireModel=Rover+M%2FT+Maxx+Traction

How much more noise should I expect over the stock ATs with those Dunlops? The tread pattern is more aggressive then any I have had in the past. Wonder if it would drive me crazy during the summer.

eta-

Originally Posted By Prime:
You'll also have to consider fuel economy and road noise when looking at MTs. You'd probably be pretty well served with a good AT like the BFG AT KOs. I read a story on a 4Runner forum about a guy who pulled a UPS truck out of the ditch in snow on a set of Firestone Destinations, which are good tires, but not anything really special.
I'd suggest seeing if your vehicle has an online forum. Someone somewhere has already done this.


Will check it out.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 1:34:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 1:46:57 AM EDT
It's more expensive to run snow tires, but not as much more expensive as folks think. Consider this: You're gonna put miles on a set of tires. If you get a set of snows and another set for warmer months, you only drive the snow tires for four months or so. They'll last several seasons. Likewise, your regular tires will still last for as many miles, whether you spread those miles out over 5 years or 15.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 1:51:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By FDC:
On snow, any aggressive AT or MT will work fine. Snow is easy to drive through. On ice, the more edges to grip, and the softer the rubber, the better. This is why some people sipe their tires, as Chairborne previously mentioned. I've been running BFG ATs for the last 15 odd years on various trucks. They are great in the snow, and since I keep getting the stiffer tires, just OK on ice. The Blizzaks or Nokian tires are good on ice without studs.


MT's will AT's might not, the problem with snow is it can build up on the tire.

MT's are designed to be "self cleaning" to keep mud from building up in the tread, they will do the same in snow. AT's might not be as good at keeping the snow from building up.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:03:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Waldo:

I've never had a dedicated snow tire on any of my 4x4 trucks. I've run both A/T and M/T tires in the winter and never really noticed much difference in day to day winter driving.

I keep a set of tire chains in the bed during winter for some of the really bad places I go.


I'm the same and have lived in the snow belts off Lake Erie my entire life. The only thing I ever watch is tire width. A wide tire will tend to float on the hard packed snow and not get a lot of traction. I had one set of pro-comp mud terrains in 33/12.5/15 that tended to spin in packed snow and slush. They worked great in 4x4.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:59:33 AM EDT
Look for the snow designation on the tires. My AT/TA-ko's actually have the extreme snow designation and work great on my K1500. I leave for work about 2 hours before our roads get plowed and 12" of snow is no problem at all unless it is that heavy wet sleet mix, then I need 4wd if it is any more than about 6-8" deep. What you are putting the tires on matters too, every vehicle has its preference. My wife's Rav4 prefers the car-style snow tires with lots of little pockets (not talking about the siping), AT/TA's worked like crap on that light little buggy.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 3:13:02 AM EDT


Snow is where my tires belong. They kick butt in it.

Trxus MTs aired down to 10 psi will stomp ANY snow tire. We do runs in 5-6 feet of snow, no problem as long as you aren't climbing steep hills. Helps having front and rear lockers...
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:21:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 6:22:52 AM EDT by ar15newcomer]
i had BF A/T KO's on my little s10 blazer and had no trouble in snow that i was plowing with my front bumper and everything underneath the blazer they have the snow flake on the side of the tire to. they are snow rated.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:05:18 AM EDT
bump
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:09:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:11:51 AM EDT
My wrangler has BFG All terrian KO's and no problem this past winter in 54" of snow. Good off road and on.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:12:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:13:59 AM EDT by VacaDuck]

Originally Posted By marksman121:
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T
http://www.1010tires.com/images/tires/Dunlop/Dunlop_RoverMTMaxxT_lg.jpg


Also we can not have studded in CA.




Are you sure about this?

The sell them at the Les Schwab in Susanville. I know half the town runs them in the winter, including a couple CHP officers on their personal vehicles.

ETA:

You are wrong. From the CHP website:

I have studded tires installed on my vehicle. Are they legal in California? When?
The California Vehicle Code [Section 27454 (e)], permits studded tires to be used on vehicles between November 1 and April 30 of each year. The number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway cannot exceed three percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway.

Since there could be some confusion on this issue, you may wish to write to the CHP. That way you will receive an official response that you can carry in your vehicle. The mailing address is:

California Highway Patrol
Office of Public Affairs
P. O. Box 942898
Sacramento, CA 94298-0001


Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:16:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:16:31 AM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By VacaDuck:

Originally Posted By marksman121:
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T
http://www.1010tires.com/images/tires/Dunlop/Dunlop_RoverMTMaxxT_lg.jpg


Also we can not have studded in CA.




Are you sure about this?

The sell them at the Les Schwab in Susanville. I know half the town runs them in the winter, including a couple CHP officers on their personal vehicles.

ETA:

You are wrong. From the CHP website:

I have studded tires installed on my vehicle. Are they legal in California? When?
The California Vehicle Code [Section 27454 (e)], permits studded tires to be used on vehicles between November 1 and April 30 of each year. The number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway cannot exceed three percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway.

Since there could be some confusion on this issue, you may wish to write to the CHP. That way you will receive an official response that you can carry in your vehicle. The mailing address is:

California Highway Patrol
Office of Public Affairs
P. O. Box 942898
Sacramento, CA 94298-0001




I always get told that they are illegal all year when I go in for tires. Will check those out too then. Nov 1- April would pretty much cover it for the Sierra too.

Anyone used studded before?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:17:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By marksman121:
Originally Posted By VacaDuck:

Originally Posted By marksman121:
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T
http://www.1010tires.com/images/tires/Dunlop/Dunlop_RoverMTMaxxT_lg.jpg


Also we can not have studded in CA.




Are you sure about this?

The sell them at the Les Schwab in Susanville. I know half the town runs them in the winter, including a couple CHP officers on their personal vehicles.

ETA:

You are wrong. From the CHP website:

I have studded tires installed on my vehicle. Are they legal in California? When?
The California Vehicle Code [Section 27454 (e)], permits studded tires to be used on vehicles between November 1 and April 30 of each year. The number of studs or the percentage of metal in contact with the roadway cannot exceed three percent of the total tire area in contact with the roadway.

Since there could be some confusion on this issue, you may wish to write to the CHP. That way you will receive an official response that you can carry in your vehicle. The mailing address is:

California Highway Patrol
Office of Public Affairs
P. O. Box 942898
Sacramento, CA 94298-0001




I always get told that they are illegal all year when I go in for tires. Will check those out too then. Nov 1- April would pretty much cover it for the Sierra too.

Anyone used studded before?

My BIL lives in Susanville and he runs them on his vehicles. Other than a lot of road noise, they work very well.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:19:20 AM EDT
For a good year round 4x4 tire that is also outstanding in snow take a look at the Goodyear Duratracs... I can't say enough about them
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:30:58 AM EDT
Here in Pa we can use studs for the winter months. I use 3 sets of tire on my car. I use use pilot a\s for the spring and fall, pilot sports for the summer and ws60( which they no longer make) for winter. Price will very by size. I only use one set of wheels on my car. If i dont change my own tire , i just got to sears. They have free mount and bal for life if you buy the tires from them, if you only bought snow tires form them , they have a snow tire change over which is 10 bucks a tire to mount and bal.

You just need to figure out if its worth the money to you. I drive 120 mile round trip to and from work so for me i think the investment is worth it. Some years it pays off having snow tires , like last winter we got a ton of snow, some years we hardly get any. Your tires will last a long thime though, With 2 sets of tires you will most likley see at least 4 season on the snow tires(depending on how much you drive and temp when installed).
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:45:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:48:26 AM EDT by 300BR]
A/T and M/T tires will work well in un-packed snow (in other words, most any road before anybody else drives on it). But, as more people drive on the road, the more packed the snow becomes, and the more siping and tread compound will become an issue. A/T's and M/T's even siped are all but useless on wet snow that gets hard packed. If the surface turns to glare, nothing will help you but studs. I've watched stopped vehicles slide sideways off the crown of the road into the ditch. I have slid 25-30 yards across a parking lot at less than 5 MPH with siped A/T's, hit another vehicle and started a domino effect. So, if you are in an area that gets glare ice conditions more that 2 or 3 times a winter. Get studs. The new carbide studs will last 2-3 seasons if you drive sanely.

I tried siping my Toyo A/T's. I went back to studs. NO COMPARISON.

The Cooper Discoverer M+S studded are an excellent value. I bought my last set used and this will be their 3rd winter.

Once you've driven in bad conditions with studded snow tires, you'll wonder why everybody else is driving so slow.

John
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 5:46:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 300BR:
A/T and M/T tires will work well in un-packed snow (in other words, most any road before anybody else drives on it). But, as more people drive on the road, the more packed the snow becomes, and the more siping and tread compound will become an issue. A/T's and M/T's even siped are all but useless on wet snow that gets hard packed. If the surface turns to glare, nothing will help you but studs. I've watched stopped vehicles slide sideways off the crown of the road into the ditch. I have slid 25-30 yards across a parking lot at less than 5 MPH with siped A/T's, hit another vehicle and started a domino effect. So, if you are in an area that gets glare ice conditions more that 2 or 3 times a winter. Get studs. The new carbide studs will last 2-3 seasons if you drive sanely.

I tried siping my Toyo A/T's. I went back to studs. NO COMPARISON.

The Cooper Discoverer M+S studded are an excellent value. I bought my last set used and this will be their 3rd winter.

Once you've driven in bad conditions with studded snow tires, you'll wonder why everybody else is driving so slow.

John


Liking the sound of the studded tires. Ice is a big issue getting up some of the hills in Truckee.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:26:51 PM EDT
Next time you are in Truckee go to Stones Tires on pioneer trail next to the concrete plant. Dave or Travis will be able to give you the skinny on what works around there.

I had BFG's on my Toyota when the freeway was icy and I had to slow for another spinout. Have you considered a disposable truck btw?

I had Bridgestone Dueler Revo's on an SUV and they kept me out of 2 accidents. The Revo's are discontinued and the Revo 2's are out. I have a brand new set on the Toyota.

You can read the reviews on Tirerack to get an idea of what people think works. I have BFG Rugged Trails that came on a 3/4 ton and drove a couple of thousand miles through snow and Ice on 80. They did OK but I felt them break out a few times. I also got pathetically stuck in the snow once just pulling off the road.

I think that when choosing tires for Truckee, go with studs if you can. The narrower the better. I always pick for how they do in the worst weather around here. For an AT obviously I am partial to the Revo's. I think the wedge design tends to find a part of the tread that will bite while a block design will break loose sooner.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:32:26 PM EDT


I run these on my Discovery and have never had problems in the snow. I need to invest in a set of chains for the ice just in case. The wife's car gets a set of Blizzaks. They can't be beat.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:37:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T
http://www.1010tires.com/images/tires/Dunlop/Dunlop_RoverMTMaxxT_lg.jpg


Also we can not have studded in CA.







I have these exact tires. They are effin good to go. I put them on last October. Used them through hunting (sand, mud) and through winter (snow, slush) and during the summer (rain). They have performed better than I had hoped. I will never use another tire on my truck again.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:39:08 PM EDT
Don't get much snow where we live here but I haven't had a complaint about the Revo's I run on my old 80 series Land Cruiser when it does get snowy.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:47:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 9:47:57 PM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By groovyrascal:
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Looking at the Dunlop Rover M/T Maxx Traction for when I need to replace the trucks tires. I was wondering how much more traction I would get on snow and ice with snow tires like Blizzaks than with the 'off road' tread. The 'all seasons' that came on the truck were not so great on the snow and are worn down and look like summers now.

Is there a big difference in the traction between the two on soft powder?

Dunlop Rover M/T
http://www.1010tires.com/images/tires/Dunlop/Dunlop_RoverMTMaxxT_lg.jpg


Also we can not have studded in CA.



I have these exact tires. They are effin good to go. I put them on last October. Used them through hunting (sand, mud) and through winter (snow, slush) and during the summer (rain). They have performed better than I had hoped. I will never use another tire on my truck again.


Good to hear.

I am looking at getting a Tacoma later on(next year or sooner) instead of the current truck. Anyone know what size tires can fit w/o having to get a lift? Looking at the 2006 and newer TRD models.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:51:24 PM EDT
BFG Mud Terrain's

WIN!

I had some Federal MS351 AT's on my xterra and never had a problem bombing down streets that weren't plowed when we had 18" of snow on the ground.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:02:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ChrisLe:
For a good year round 4x4 tire that is also outstanding in snow take a look at the Goodyear Duratracs... I can't say enough about them


+1 on the Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac. Classified as an AT but works well down here in the Georgia Clay. Very quiet on the highway, I use them on my Jeep Wrangler and I commute 140 miles a day.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:03:00 PM EDT
Needed new tires this summer so I got the BFG A/T KOs. I'm still looking into getting a set of chains though in case we get another ridiculous snow fall again this winter. I HAVE to be able to get around (one could say lives depend on it) and my old tires worked great in snow when new, but when they got worn over the years they really lost their traction. Snow wasn't as bad as when it freezes. Then I got stuck for 5 minutes until I could dig by hand through the frozen tire ruts enough to rock myself free.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:22:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:22:23 PM EDT by Sleepy1988]
How will chains do on dirt or gravel roads with varying snowy and icy conditions? Will you be able to get through ice and thick, soft powder?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:24:15 PM EDT
Really depends on the tread pattern of the tire.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:26:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:27:40 PM EDT by hoosier122]
Most off-road tires are too wide to be decent snow tires.

Yeah, I know it's NY times, but it's a source. http://www.nytimes.com/1990/12/30/sports/l-narrow-vs-wide-in-tire-safety-001090.html
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 11:09:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By hoosier122:
Most off-road tires are too wide to be decent snow tires.

Yeah, I know it's NY times, but it's a source. http://www.nytimes.com/1990/12/30/sports/l-narrow-vs-wide-in-tire-safety-001090.html


I agree and have proven this to be very true with my jeep, and my old 2wd pickup.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 11:24:16 PM EDT
When I lived in northern CO, I kept a set of studded tires mounted up for all 4 corners - on plain old steel OEM wheels.

Studded tires are worth the effort. Braking & cornering are just as important as launching the vehicle. The tire clowns in Loveland thought it was overkill to run them on the front end of a 2wd pickup. One year I swapped the rears only, just to see if they were right... After a good scare I drove home like an old lady & swapped the fronts!

Nothing special, just plain old 7.50-15 mud tires with studs in every hole. Nice & narrow, went through mud & snow like it had chains on.

Find 4 ugly wheels now, while it is still warm out. Snows last several seasons, and your summer tires can be a better (less compromise) choice for the vehicle. Studded truck tires are cheaper than blizzaks too...

Lem
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 11:39:43 PM EDT
This thread needs more pics.



Tires in that picture are Yokohama Geolanders. I run them all year long and have never gotten stuck because I had ineffective tires. But there was one time in greasy mud that I almost went over a large cliff...

That said, I put Blizzaks on all my limousines in the winter time. For on road driving in the winter, their grip is unmatched by anything other than chains.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:13:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Originally Posted By 300BR:
A/T and M/T tires will work well in un-packed snow (in other words, most any road before anybody else drives on it). But, as more people drive on the road, the more packed the snow becomes, and the more siping and tread compound will become an issue. A/T's and M/T's even siped are all but useless on wet snow that gets hard packed. If the surface turns to glare, nothing will help you but studs. I've watched stopped vehicles slide sideways off the crown of the road into the ditch. I have slid 25-30 yards across a parking lot at less than 5 MPH with siped A/T's, hit another vehicle and started a domino effect. So, if you are in an area that gets glare ice conditions more that 2 or 3 times a winter. Get studs. The new carbide studs will last 2-3 seasons if you drive sanely.

I tried siping my Toyo A/T's. I went back to studs. NO COMPARISON.

The Cooper Discoverer M+S studded are an excellent value. I bought my last set used and this will be their 3rd winter.

Once you've driven in bad conditions with studded snow tires, you'll wonder why everybody else is driving so slow.

John


Liking the sound of the studded tires. Ice is a big issue getting up some of the hills in Truckee.


Most of the people who'll tell you this works or that works don't really know the limits of their equipment or haven't been in a situation where studs would have been the only thing to save them. What they're really saying is A/T's or M/T's have worked... SO FAR! If you want to experiment with your fenders, get some A/T's or M/T's. If you want to be the guy at the end of the winter with a straight vehicle. Run studs. Yeah, they're expensive and noisy, but CHEAP insurance against that *one* day. Do you think these guys with their A/T's and M'T's will be there to pay when you slide off the road and do a couple barrel rolls? I didn't think so.

John

Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:28:14 PM EDT
From what I've heard, MT works good for power and straight line travel, but don't have the lateral stability or bite for more compacted snow. I have read of a few people on swampers and other aggressive tires having zero control on side angles, where if they stop they will slide on the snow until it levels out or they hit something.

Of course, once you sipe you can gain that better compacted snow grip, but it still won't beat a real winter tire, since they have a different type of rubber that stays pliable in colder weather, as well as full depth siping.

My BFG a/t's did fine for me last winter (a few intersections get iced over here, and get a little annoying), hoping my Cooper ST work ok this winter.
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