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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 9/30/2011 6:44:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:07:17 PM EST by Flamicane]
First of all, I know that most of GD knows diddly-squat about saltwater tanks; but I know there are a few experts on the boards. The question I have doesn't really need any experience behind it anyway.

So, I'm torn on the upgrade for my current 46 Gallon Aqueon Bowfront between a 55 gallon and 100 gallon tank.



  • 46 Gallon Aqueon Bowfront 36 x 16 x 21

  • 55 Gallon Rectangular 48 x 13 x 20

  • 100 Gallon Rectangular 60X24X18



Here is the deal:

I actually own the drilled 100 gallon tank, stand, and canopy but I need to replace the tank because of concerns about the front left seam. I bought the tank for dirt cheap and had originally intended to flip it. The replacement tank would cost me about $250 and I would need an external overflow or two (~$100)

Here is the actual tank as setup by previous owner:

My wife is not too thrilled about the honey pine colored furniture. Most of the furniture I own is made from cherry wood.

Next up is the 55 Gallon tank:

I own this tank and stand as well. I bought this for the Oceanic tank itself that is almost in mint condition. Unfortunately the furniture sucks and would need to be upgraded, preferably with a cherry wood finish. The local fish store has a canopy and stand setup that would cost ~$430 in a cherry color. The furniture looks kinda like the below pic here (but with cherry finish):


So what should I do hive-mind? 55 or 100?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:53:54 PM EST
Saltwater tanks are extremely efficient fish killing machines.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:58:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
Saltwater tanks are extremely efficient fish killing machines.



I must be doing something wrong...mine are still all alive after a few years.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:03:24 PM EST
100.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:14:40 PM EST


Go big or don't go at all.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:17:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:18:47 PM EST by mousehunter]
Consider how you will aquascape it. Most people tend to not think of the tank as a whole, but as a 2 dimensional living canvas. That is great for showing off colorful fish - but gives you no depth for plants or corals.

A normal 75 is a 4ft tank. When you try to shave it down to 55 you loose an inch or two off the top (height), but far more critically off the back (the depth). It becomes far more 2D rather than 3D. If you want a 55 - serious consider a 55 (56) show - which is a 75 scaled down to 56 by making it 3 ft, while maintaining height and depth. One added bonus - it is possible to light it with a single metal halide pendent. Point source light kicks ass.

Given your options - do the 100. It has a lot more depth to develop.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:18:41 PM EST
100g but go with drilled instead of hang on overflows, they suck. 55's are too narrow front to back to get a nice aquascape usually.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:25:39 PM EST
I got a 100 I think its the smallest tank one should own
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:26:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By mousehunter:
Consider how you will aquascape it. Most people tend to not think of the tank as a whole, but as a 2 dimensional living canvas. That is great for showing off colorful fish - but gives you no depth for plants or corals.

A normal 75 is a 4ft tank. When you try to shave it down to 55 you loose an inch or two off the top (height), but far more critically off the back (the depth). It becomes far more 2D rather than 3D. If you want a 55 - serious consider a 55 (56) show - which is a 75 scaled down to 56 by making it 3 ft, while maintaining height and depth. One added bonus - it is possible to light it with a single metal halide pendent. Point source light kicks ass.

Given your options - do the 100. It has a lot more depth to develop.


I have two T5 Fixtures and I will be building an Cree LED fixture as well. I'm just deciding on the tank before I start putting that together. I've already built a Cree 3w (70w total) assembly inside of a CurrentUSA PC fixture for my 37 gallon tank. If I go the 100 gallon route I will probably build two wide islands.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:33:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:36:12 PM EST by ChrisGarrett]
Go 100gal.

I'm at 75g, which is fine for my needs, but 100g will be that much bigger. A bigger tank is a better and more accomodating tank.

What about refinishing the existing canopy and stand? Sawdust would be a problem, but it might be the easier way to go?

Chris
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:35:45 PM EST
Talk to I_LIKE_PORKCHOPS. He's a hardcore aquarium guy.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:37:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:40:40 PM EST by JD762]
Go with the 100. You wont gain much with the 55 gallon over the 46 bow and IMO a well done 46 bow is better than a standard 55 visually.

What do you plan livestock wise? Fish only? FOWLR? Reef? A 100 gallon reef, as Im sure you know, aint cheap. I would keep the 46 a reef and turn the 100 into a simple FOWL and maybe some softies and add some really nice non reef safe/large colorful fish like some triggers and angels.

Im rocking an 8 gallon biocube reef tank right now as my first salt water tank. Ive been keeping large, exotic predatory fish for years. Well until I recently moved to Florida where they all were illegal.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:40:12 PM EST
Always go bigger. You'll never wish you went smaller.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:43:27 PM EST
100, besides where are you going to put all your current stock?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:47:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By JD762:
Go with the 100. You wont gain much with the 55 gallon over the 46 bow and IMO a well done 46 bow is better than a standard 55 visually.

What do you plan livestock wise? Fish only? FOWLR? Reef? A 100 gallon reef, as Im sure you know, aint cheap. I would keep the 46 a reef and turn the 100 into a simple FOWL and maybe some softies and add some really nice non reef safe/large colorful fish like some triggers and angels.

Im rocking an 8 gallon biocube reef tank right now as my first salt water tank. Ive been keeping large, exotic predatory fish for years. Well until I recently moved to Florida where they all were illegal.



I've been contemplating a FOWLR predator tank but I'm not sure. Right now I only have a few corals, inverts, and a pair of Ocellaris clowns in my 46. My 37 gallon is a full blown SPS reef tank. I think if I go for the FOWLR idea I'll just sell some of my fish in the 37 and move my clowns over.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:54:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 8:09:00 PM EST by Windustsearch]
I like 90 gallon tanks best, they have the width and some extra height. Stands in general suck though, and almost all of them are too low.

ETA- mine is 48" long, 18" wide, and 24" tall. It is a good sized tank with good dimensions, but not so large that it is difficult to fit through doors, around corners, etc.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:11:29 PM EST
Large tanks (>75 gal.) have more stable water chemistry and temperature. Thats a big plus for salt water. The down side is that a large tank usually has a large biolaod. People can't seem to NOT load them up with too much/too big of fish. Which eat a lot of food. Which crap a lot. Which puts a large detrius load in the tank.

This large bioload needs filtering (either undergravel biol or external), a strong active chemical filter (usually activated carbon in an external pressure canister).

If you don't do this - you will live with algae and curse the day you got into saltwater. There are no shorts and there is NO magic algae powder.

These things usually get implemented through external plumbing (in the base or elsewhere). That means a fair amount of water turnover per hour (there are formulas - use them and don't shortcut). IME - that amount of water turnover can be pretty noisy. Just FYI. You'll also need to do water changes regularly (2x month or so). That gets messy if in a nice room - believe me.

DFon't forget to use high quality check-valves for water drains to the stand. That way when power goes out - you don't drain the tank onto the floor. A tiny siphon hole drilled into the drain hard line is a good back-up - (check vales that aren't tested regularly can get funky and stick).
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:12:44 PM EST
Another vote for the 100 and refinish the stand yourself.
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