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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/31/2005 7:57:05 PM EDT
Im needing a new pair so is my gf , Im looking for something with a 6 inch side on it my gf is looking for a shoe type of hiking shoe , any ideas?. I sell redwings at work and Im looking at the redwing 8681 but I think there going to be to expensive Im going to call for a price tommrow but I think there going to be over my price range ($120) . What type of feet tires yall run? What about the ladies out there any thing thats really nice and not to costly ?the reason I ask is we are going on vaction week after this.Yes ,I know this is a big no-no getting hiking shoes/boots right before we leave and not breaking them in but my current ones are not going to cut it and she doesnt have a pair right now .TIA
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 8:04:30 PM EDT
As an avvid backpacker, I'd like to offer this:

I prefer to use trail running shoes. There is no need for heady-duty support when your pack weight is under 30lbs (like mine). It is my opinion that "ankle support" is a misnomer, for the most part. Watch how you step, and appreciate how much better light shoes feel after a long day.

The most comfortable pair of shoes I own are a pair of Montrail Vitesse. I've got hundreds of miles on these babies, and their as comfy (with a set of "Superfeet") as the day I bought them. Buying shoes is a personal thing. Head to an outfitter with a BIG selection, and try a bunch out. Talk to other backpackers. Bring your pack with you and load it up. Walk up/down inclines in the store (a good store will have these) to make sure yourfeet don't slip. Slipping and moisture is what causes blisters.

Get a good pair of wool socks (I dig Thorlos, but that's just me).
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 8:39:51 PM EDT
Vasque sundowners are one of the tried and true most popular hiking boots. They can be a bit pricey at $169 locally, but you get what you pay for. Don't buy shoes online. You need to go to a good outfitter and try on a bunch and walk around.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:36:27 AM EDT
Thanks guys , Ill check into them today. BUMP for the day shift
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:38:46 AM EDT
I wear Hi-Teks and they run between $70-$100 a pair. THe pair that I am on right now were bought the first of October. So for they have lasted longer than any other boot that I have used (which is saying a lot).
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:50:53 AM EDT
+1 Hi Teks
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 5:14:02 AM EDT
I wear Danner Explorers but they're a bit out of your price range.

In general, boots by Danner, Vasque or Asolo should fit your bill. Check out the closeouts at Campmor to see if they have anything in your price range.

As SubnetMask said, you don't always need a rock solid boot if you're keeping your pack weight low and if you're careful about where you step. Personally I like a more solid boot because I tend to go on long (7-10 day) backcountry trips where my pack is >30 lbs and I'm in mountainous country.

Price isn't always a good indicator of quality. I wore out a pair of $180 Timberland boots in two 10-day trips. I won't buy Timberland again.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:34:48 AM EDT

I have to second the trail running shoe statement. Even on long trips, there's no need to lug a massive pack. Trim your pack weight down to < 30, put on some trail running shoes (just make sure they have a solid insole) and you'll enjoy your hiking that much more.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:41:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Jon3:
I have to second the trail running shoe statement. Even on long trips, there's no need to lug a massive pack. Trim your pack weight down to < 30, put on some trail running shoes (just make sure they have a solid insole) and you'll enjoy your hiking that much more.



+2

and an extra pound on your feet will be noticed more than you might expect after a few miles.
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