Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 3/18/2009 5:21:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2009 4:46:56 PM EST by ds3_09]
I've never had a bike. I had a quad about 9 years ago. A honda 400EX I think it was called.

I have always wanted a dual sport. I am in a rural area close to a good sized town. I am likely to be moving to a much more rural area close to a much smaller town.

Basically it would be for fun. Some light commuting on care free days on the weekend. Maybe more if I like it enough. I'd probably find longer routes on country roads for fun. I would most definitely do some trails. Probably not hardcore. I know it wouldn't be ideal but I'd like to take it to Little Sahara (probably fairly rarely) to rip some dunes up occasionally. I don't know what to expect with a dual sport but I'd like to be able to get some air with this thing if the conditions are right. I don't know if this can be done well with the heavier bikes. I really have no clue.

I want to get a new bike. I can swing it. I'm going to be a licensed dentist by June so the money shouldn't be a problem.

I'm just not sure if I should get a 250cc, 400, 650 or what. I'm really leaning towards a Suzuki DR-Z400S. If I went with a 250 I'd likely get a Yamaha WR250R. If I went bigger it's a tossup between a Honda xr650l or a Suzuki DR650se.

Like I said I'm leaning towards a dr-z400s.

What does arfcom think?

Oh yea is it normal to pay MSRP for these or can you usally get them for less? I have no idea.

UPDATE!! Here are crappy pics of my new bike. My son keeps saying it's the coolest motorcycle in the world and it's his .




Link Posted: 3/18/2009 6:04:09 PM EST
Dual sports are awesome bikes. They are fun to ride, handle a lot of different roads and surfaces well. They are tough, reasonably priced and easy to drive.

The 200/250's are very capable bikes. They do tend to freuqently start seeming a bit lacking at highway speeds (depending on the model). The bigger 650's are great bikes and many a 650 Dual sport has gone on extremely long trips. Unfortunately, the 650s are quite a bit heavier than the littel 250 class bikes...

The 400 class bikes have alsways struck me as a valid compromise. Somewhat heavier than the 250's but with a fair bit more displacement. I'm not currently looking at bikes but I'd be very temped by Suzuki's DR400.

I do run a DR200 in MSF classes. This bike has seen a hard life before we ever got it, and it sees more hard use in the course (Lots of idling, not a lot of cooling, constant shifting/clutching, etc). The DR200's have held up very well, as has every other Suzuki product we've run (12 out of 15 bikes).

I would not hesitate to consdier the DR400...
Link Posted: 3/18/2009 6:13:15 PM EST
Originally Posted By frozenny:
Dual sports are awesome bikes. They are fun to ride, handle a lot of different roads and surfaces well. They are tough, reasonably priced and easy to drive.

The 200/250's are very capable bikes. They do tend to freuqently start seeming a bit lacking at highway speeds (depending on the model). The bigger 650's are great bikes and many a 650 Dual sport has gone on extremely long trips. Unfortunately, the 650s are quite a bit heavier than the littel 250 class bikes...

The 400 class bikes have alsways struck me as a valid compromise. Somewhat heavier than the 250's but with a fair bit more displacement. I'm not currently looking at bikes but I'd be very temped by Suzuki's DR400.

I do run a DR200 in MSF classes. This bike has seen a hard life before we ever got it, and it sees more hard use in the course (Lots of idling, not a lot of cooling, constant shifting/clutching, etc). The DR200's have held up very well, as has every other Suzuki product we've run (12 out of 15 bikes).

I would not hesitate to consdier the DR400...


The MSRP is $6099. What would be reasonable for me to offer for one at a dealer right now?
Link Posted: 3/18/2009 6:27:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/18/2009 6:30:46 PM EST by matt33]
I have a 2008 WR250R. They are probably the highest performing of the 250cc DS bikes, IMHO by a considerable margin. The WR is close to a DRZ400s in peak HP, but does give up some torque down low. I really like the WR's EFI, aluminum frame, 6 speed tranny, lighter weight, and superior suspension. I added a set of Dunlop D606's, Protaper bars, eliminated the OEM rear taillight assy, and had the dealer set up the suspension for me (6', 170lbs). The WR will get to 85 MPH fairly quickly, and I've hit 95 MPH indicated, though that takes some patience and a good strech of road. My WR is now perfect for my off road and rural road use. If you want to buy a used bike, there aren't many WR's around since they just came out in 2008. I've seen some outstanding deals on DRZ's, that might be a better way to go if you're on the fence between these two and cost is a factor. Either way, you'll end up with a great bike that's tons of fun.


Link Posted: 3/18/2009 6:30:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By matt33:
I have a 2008 WR250R. They are probably the highest performing of the 250cc DS bikes, IMHO by a considerable margin. The WR is close to a DRZ400s in peak HP, but do give up some torque down low. I really like the WR's EFI, aluminum frame, 6 speed tranny, lighter weight, and superior suspension. I added a set of Dunlop D606's, Protaper bars, eliminated the OEM rear taillight assy, and had the dealer set up the suspension for me (6', 170lbs). The WR will get to 85 MPH fairly quickly, and I've hit 95 MPH indicated, though that takes some patience and a good strech of road. My WR is now perfect for my off road and rural road use. If you want to buy a used bike, there aren't many WR's around since they just came out in 2008. I've seen some outstanding deals on DRZ's, that might be a better way to go if you're on the fence between these two and cost is a factor. Either way, you'll end up with a good bike.
http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q304/mccullm6/bikeali048.jpg

http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q304/mccullm6/bikeali035.jpg


How much would you offer on a new one given MSRP is $6090?
Link Posted: 3/18/2009 6:35:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
Originally Posted By matt33:
I have a 2008 WR250R. They are probably the highest performing of the 250cc DS bikes, IMHO by a considerable margin. The WR is close to a DRZ400s in peak HP, but do give up some torque down low. I really like the WR's EFI, aluminum frame, 6 speed tranny, lighter weight, and superior suspension. I added a set of Dunlop D606's, Protaper bars, eliminated the OEM rear taillight assy, and had the dealer set up the suspension for me (6', 170lbs). The WR will get to 85 MPH fairly quickly, and I've hit 95 MPH indicated, though that takes some patience and a good strech of road. My WR is now perfect for my off road and rural road use. If you want to buy a used bike, there aren't many WR's around since they just came out in 2008. I've seen some outstanding deals on DRZ's, that might be a better way to go if you're on the fence between these two and cost is a factor. Either way, you'll end up with a good bike.
http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q304/mccullm6/bikeali048.jpg

http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q304/mccullm6/bikeali035.jpg


How much would you offer on a new one given MSRP is $6090?

In 2008, MSRP was $5899. I offered and paid $5700 plus sales tax. There was no charge for assembly and freight, though many dealers try to add this crap. I paid a little over $6k with 6% sales tax and tags in PA. The way the economy is right now, I'd offer $5,500 for one and see what happens.
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 10:17:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/19/2009 10:18:47 AM EST by IIRC]

The MSRP is $6099. What would be reasonable for me to offer for one at a dealer right now?




A few months ago, a dealer by me had 3 leftover, but still brand new, 2007 DRZ's that they were selling for $4499.99

When I went to look, the only one they had left was the SM model, which I didn't want.

Anywhoo, they might be willing to deal more than you'd think. Especially if it's a leftover model.
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 10:29:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/19/2009 10:30:48 AM EST by ds3_09]
Ok I went and looked at some today. I am going to get a Yamaha WR250R. It just felt the most comfortable to me. I am a small guy. About 5' 10" 155lbs. The DRZ-400 was nice but for some reason the seat just hurt my bony ass. I just felt better on the WR250R even though the seat looks even narrower it felt good. I can tell it will handle better just sitting on it. I think it will suit my needs perfect. I will most definately be using it to drive around on country roads and to hit some trails. I may not be really aggressive for a while. I looked at Riding jackets, gloves, helmets, etc also.

I gotta admit I felt nervous even sitting on these. My parents drilled into me my whole life how they are death traps. I have always really wanted a dual sport. I bought my sport quad when I was 18 or 19 only because my dad would not cosign on a dual sport bike.

I can't hardly believe the insurance quote I was given for about $150 for an entire year. WOW. I don't know what it customary but that is good enough for me.
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 1:36:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
Ok I went and looked at some today. I am going to get a Yamaha WR250R. It just felt the most comfortable to me. I am a small guy. About 5' 10" 155lbs. The DRZ-400 was nice but for some reason the seat just hurt my bony ass. I just felt better on the WR250R even though the seat looks even narrower it felt good. I can tell it will handle better just sitting on it. I think it will suit my needs perfect. I will most definately be using it to drive around on country roads and to hit some trails. I may not be really aggressive for a while. I looked at Riding jackets, gloves, helmets, etc also.

I gotta admit I felt nervous even sitting on these. My parents drilled into me my whole life how they are death traps. I have always really wanted a dual sport. I bought my sport quad when I was 18 or 19 only because my dad would not cosign on a dual sport bike.

I can't hardly believe the insurance quote I was given for about $150 for an entire year. WOW. I don't know what it customary but that is good enough for me.


One of the most awesome perks of riding a dual sport.

Take the MSF course, and buy the best gear you can possibly afford - it WILL save your ass. The thing with a dual sport, if you really ride it, is that you WILL be off that bike a time or two (or twenty if you ride like me). Gear works, and if you buy good gear it's actually comfy and increases your enjoyment.

You chose a GREAT bike, btw....if I had the funds I'd be on one right now. It will be my next bike.
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 1:37:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/19/2009 1:54:07 PM EST by Alacrity]
I agree the WR250R is by far the best dirt performing 250 DS out there, likely the best all around as well - but the HP isnt comparable to the DRZ - about 30% short.

2008 Suzuki Dr Z400sm Graph



2008 Yamaha Wr250r Graph


Still one helluva bike. I wouldn't hesitate to buy one if thats what fit me. Suspension is tops. The DRZ is a fine DS as well - does everything pretty well but does no one thing as well as some more focused others. Which made it the perfect compromise bike for me. I have a soon to be plated '06 DRZ-E - but the WR sounds spot on for what your doing - especially so since it fit.

Gonna parrot Swingset - get good gear and wear it. Theres always bargains out there. Lid and Boots spend as much as you can afford - and make sure they fit like your bike. As long as it has Snell - theres no best only comfort. If you dont have a good group to ride with (and maybe even if you do - I had to unlearn some crap imparted by well meaning friends) theres plenty of good skills DVDs out there since sounds like you may not have much dirt exp. Always much to learn Hell I'm going to try to get to a few schools this year.

My parents had the same attitude. But better to start with some hesitation and respect than recklessness. You'll be fine. Hell you're on a gun board, imagine you already have respect for items that demand it.

Luck
Alac
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 1:58:56 PM EST
Just bought an "08 WR250X this Saturday, was looking for an R, but at $4,000 cash with 590 babied miles, I jumped at it. Dirt wheels are coming to me soon! Dealer's prices ranged from about 5-6K by me, I like the black frame, swingarm, etc. Good luck!
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 4:09:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/19/2009 4:34:25 PM EST by matt33]
Originally Posted By Alacrity:
I agree the WR250R is by far the best dirt performing 250 DS out there, likely the best all around as well - but the HP isnt comparable to the DRZ - about 30% short.

2008 Suzuki Dr Z400sm Graph
http://image.motorcyclistonline.com/f/10493920/122_0810_37_z+2008_suzuki_dr_z400sm+graph.jpg


2008 Yamaha Wr250r Graph
http://image.motorcyclistonline.com/f/10493836/122_0810_39_z+2008_yamaha_wr250r+graph.jpg

Still one helluva bike. I wouldn't hesitate to buy one if thats what fit me. Suspension is tops. The DRZ is a fine DS as well - does everything pretty well but does no one thing as well as some more focused others. Which made it the perfect compromise bike for me. I have a soon to be plated '06 DRZ-E - but the WR sounds spot on for what your doing - especially so since it fit.

Gonna parrot Swingset - get good gear and wear it. Theres always bargains out there. Lid and Boots spend as much as you can afford - and make sure they fit like your bike. As long as it has Snell - theres no best only comfort. If you dont have a good group to ride with (and maybe even if you do - I had to unlearn some crap imparted by well meaning friends) theres plenty of good skills DVDs out there since sounds like you may not have much dirt exp. Always much to learn Hell I'm going to try to get to a few schools this year.

My parents had the same attitude. But better to start with some hesitation and respect than recklessness. You'll be fine. Hell you're on a gun board, imagine you already have respect for items that demand it.

Luck
Alac


The graph isn't really a fair comparision. The chrono numbers you post are not for the Suzuki DRZ400s (dual sport version). The Suzuki DRZ 400s vs. the WR250R is a fair comparision and one I'd like to see. The supermoto version you posted has tuning and is equipped similarly to the off road only DRZ "E" version (at least that's what I've read, I'm not entirely sure of the differences though), so you could probably find chrono figures for an off road only WR250F to compare. Also, that is the lowest WR250R chrono chart I've ever seen posted. Guys on thumpertalk get much better numbers than that with an EFI tuner, airbox, and slip-on change. My WR250R title says "29.5 HP" (which may be optimistic), though every dyno run I've seen even for a bone stock WR250R is over 25 HP.

Link Posted: 3/19/2009 6:07:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/19/2009 6:11:34 PM EST by CEFPARTS]
Welcome to the DS club! You will have a blast. Take your time and get acquainted with the bike. Do smaller trips first. If your yard is big enough, practice riding in 1-2nd gear and learn balance. I grew up on dirt bikes but just yesterday, I grabbed the front brake while taking a side road and the front tire washed out. I was almost over the handle bars when I stomped my foot down to catch myself and luckily got the bike and myself back upright, then I was just headed for the ditch... Got it gathered back up and got on down the road, thanking God and cursing my stupidity for a) going a little too fast into a turn on a gravel road and b) not using my rear brake cause I have been thrown like that before and I should know. One of the most important things everyone learns about motorcycles is ALWAYS wear safety gear. Must haves are a good helmet, eye protection, and motocross boots. Then you can think about how you ride and what items you would like that provide more protection. Good luck and have fun. Wes


ETA: You can check into ADVrider for regional forums with like minded individuals http://www.advrider.com/ Great place!
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 8:34:46 PM EST
I joined the Dual Sport club last year with an old used DR250S. It's a great bike, but I got tired of the kick-start and the high seat height. I thought about the various D/S models around and ended up ordering a new DR650. I'm not tall, only 5'9" and wanted a lower seat height. The DR650 has one of the lowest seat heights of the bikes mentioned. It's suspension is not as good as the other bikes, but I plan to upgrade to Eibach springs front and rear. It maybe a little heavier, but I've found I'm on the road more often than the dirt, so the extra power of the 650 is nice.
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 11:14:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By matt33:
The graph isn't really a fair comparision. The chrono numbers you post are not for the Suzuki DRZ400s (dual sport version). The Suzuki DRZ 400s vs. the WR250R is a fair comparision and one I'd like to see. The supermoto version you posted has tuning and is equipped similarly to the off road only DRZ "E" version (at least that's what I've read, I'm not entirely sure of the differences though), so you could probably find chrono figures for an off road only WR250F to compare. Also, that is the lowest WR250R chrono chart I've ever seen posted. Guys on thumpertalk get much better numbers than that with an EFI tuner, airbox, and slip-on change. My WR250R title says "29.5 HP" (which may be optimistic), though every dyno run I've seen even for a bone stock WR250R is over 25 HP.



The DRZ supermoto version is almost identical to the "S" model. The only difference is gearing, 15/41 vs. 15/44. The FCR, cams, compression, etc. is only for the E (and maybe K, not sure).

On an otherwise stock DRZ, the airbox mod, jet kit, and pipe will have you pushing 35-37 hp.

I have the 3x3 mod, 39mm FCR MX, and full Yoshimura, I'm sure it would stomp a WR-X until it came to gas mileage, weight, insurance cost, or the fact that not only can you smoke much larger bikes on a 400, you can also do it on a 250!
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 11:14:25 PM EST
If you're going to ride trails/offroad do yourself a favor and buy "real" offroad riding boots.

Brian
Link Posted: 3/19/2009 11:31:18 PM EST
I grew up riding dirt bikes as a kid and always wanted a dual-sport. When I was a kid we called them "enduros"....but it seems that over the years an "enduro" has become an MXer frame, w/ a 4stoke and a headlight. What we referred to as "enduros" have become known as "dual-sports". With that said I bought my first one brand new in 2003. I bought a 2003 Kawasaki KLR650. It was a great bike. A bit big and heavy for any SERIOUS trail riding and DEFINITELY not a track bike.....but great at what it was designed to do. I used to take delight in running down the highway in Arizona and seeing a dirt road that lead up into the mountains and being able to just turn down it and go. I had a good friend that had Kawasaki's version of the 400. It was a very nimble and fun little bike, but lacked the necessary power, especially up top to really be safe for highway commuting in my opinion. If you're gonna use it as everyday transportation I'd say a 650 is a must. If you're sticking to local roads, not much highway, want a more capable trail bike....go w/ one of the 400s as they're lighter, more narrow and nimble, etc. A KLR650 though is more of what I like to refer to as a "tri-sport" bike. You CAN trail ride with it to a certain point, it IS street legal and performs adequately on the highway.....but unlike the smaller "dual sports" you can outfit it to tour on w/ a few additions...i.e. a nice Corbin seat, and an array of saddle & luggage bags. There's also the issue of riding 2 up. Do you have a girlfriend, wife, etc? Anything smaller than the 650 will make riding 2 up uncomfortable and ill-advised, especially on the hwy. All things to consider. For my money you cannot go wrong w/ the Kawasaki KLR650. Although....if I ever buy another one.....I'm going all the way next time....and since the Triumph Tiger is no longer a true dual sport....I'll be purchasing the KTM Adventure 990R , or the BMW F 800 GS
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 9:33:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2009 9:35:00 AM EST by Alacrity]
Originally Posted By matt33:
The graph isn't really a fair comparision. The chrono numbers you post are not for the Suzuki DRZ400s (dual sport version). The Suzuki DRZ 400s vs. the WR250R is a fair comparision and one I'd like to see. The supermoto version you posted has tuning and is equipped similarly to the off road only DRZ "E" version (at least that's what I've read, I'm not entirely sure of the differences though), so you could probably find chrono figures for an off road only WR250F to compare. Also, that is the lowest WR250R chrono chart I've ever seen posted. Guys on thumpertalk get much better numbers than that with an EFI tuner, airbox, and slip-on change. My WR250R title says "29.5 HP" (which may be optimistic), though every dyno run I've seen even for a bone stock WR250R is over 25 HP.


Its fair. In fact, it might be the best power comparison between the two bikes available. As JoshD noted the 2008 S and SM share the same lump.

In this test, we have a responsible, objective, third party (all assumed - could be they're all on Suzuki's payroll) - a MotoMag, as opposed to a aftermarket mfg pimping its wares or a individual who bought a single $60 dyno (assuming you meant dyno instead of chono) run somewhere the conditions/parameters of the run arent known. Its not the absolute power that's important in the Motorcyclist test - Ive seen various claims for higher and lower peak HP for the '08 DRZ-S/SM. Its the relative difference in power - roughly the WR produces a third less peak HP - as well as the difference in power curves, when its produced, etc. Results across different dynos, at different altitudes, under differing condition arent nearly as useful when comparing two engines.

When the SAE dictated new protocols for engine power measurement - you had a change in almost every powerplants rated output - some up/some down. Did the engines actual output change? Nope - just the testing parameters. Why "absolute" horsepower measurements are virtually impossible to achieve. It always comparative - and no series of engines produce identical power over their entire production runs - or thoughout its individual life.

Could be that of the individual test bikes, the DRZ was a ringer and the WR a piker - but both results are within reason from what I've seen posted for both.Regardless, the difference is enough that the claim I often see - the WR produces about the same HP as the DRZ - just aint true.. All that said, buying a bike solely on peak HP aint a real good reason - and few do so. The WR has enough from all reports.

I'm not pimpin one over the other - merely putting the objective info out there. In fact the WR, for many uses, would be preferable to me. Plus I'm a Yamaha guy anyway. I'm enamored with it - and will likely have one sooner or later. If I could have scored one for $4k when Andersons was blowing them out - I might have one now.

BTW, speaking of Thumpertalk, theres plenty of dynos - Sisneros and others, of DRZ-S - warmed over producing 40hp+. The non-Kali E/K produces about 38-42 - more uncorked - and the E's go about 285 wet. Theres even a bigbore that's close to 50hp. How do these compare to the 30-32hp WR250R postings - theres really no way to know.

Just glad that the OP got a bike that FIT him - all the hype in the world dont mean shit after an hour with a bike that dont work for ya.

Luck
Alac
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 12:21:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By Alacrity:
Just glad that the OP got a bike that FIT him - all the hype in the world dont mean shit after an hour with a bike that dont work for ya.


QFT.

IIRC, Scott Summers (former Honda XR riding GNCC champion) pulled his fastest lap times on the XR250R or XR400R, not the big boy model at the time XR600 or XR650R (I can't remember exactly when the test was done). And Summers wasn't some flyweight 18 y/o kid who "couldn't handle" a big bore bike - he normally rode the XR600R as his race bike.

Brian

Link Posted: 3/20/2009 12:39:02 PM EST
my first one was a suzuki drz 400s, it sucked off road. I ended up riding it onroad all the time. I would get a 250 dual sport because of the weight. I think my bike was just to heavy and was hard to control, I have a real dirt bike, a 300 kawasaki and it is a pleasure to ride off road because its made to. I also have a suzuki v strom 650, suzuki still claims its a dual sport but I only ride that on the street. I bet once you get a taste of street riding you wont go back to dual sport. Also the smaller one have small tanks so if you plan on going a long ways to ride off road you may have a problem. With the drz I would get 80 mpg and it was a 2 gallon tank.
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 12:50:01 PM EST
Get ALFLAC

Good luck with the bike.
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 5:04:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2009 5:08:35 PM EST by ds3_09]
Pics were added to the 1st post.

I got my bike today, the insurance, and some gear. I added a 4 year extended warranty so it has a 5 year warranty.

Man I gotta say this may be a little 250cc but to me it feels like it really moves. I can see why so many people hurt themselves on these things.

I've just been driving it around my country neighborhood roads and to a park that has some small trails right across from my neighborhood and gravel roads around it. The trails are way to small to even think about going fast.

I feel fairly comfortable just riding it around taking it easy. It took about 10 min for me to feel good about taking off in it though. I kept killing it or freaking taking off way to fast scaring the bejeesus out of myself. I just was not used to the clutch or the twist throttle at all. My sport 4-wheeler had a thumb throttle (I know everyone hates those). I've got a handle on mild take offs and riding around. I keep forgetting the turn signal doesn't turn off on it's own. I got it into neutral a couple of times instead of second.

I need to do better keeping track of what gear it is in. I would about 90% of the time but on some turns I wasn't totally sure so I would down shift all the way to first and then bring it back up to what I wanted before releasing the clutch.

I can say I definitely need ALOT more practice. I want to take a safety course as soon as I can. I don't think I will want to take this into town until I am alot more practiced and confident in my abilities. I also don't think I'll be taking any jumps until I have a better handle on it. I'd be scared right now with the twist throttle if I ride it to rough and take jumps It'll cause me to give it alot more throttle on accident than I mean to making me lose control.

I really had a blast riding it don't get me wrong. I am just trying to be honest with how I feel my skill level is right now. I need alot of practice.

I think I may buy I think it's called a link or linkage (I'm not sure) to make it just a tad shorter. It feels fine most of the time but once or twice when I stopped it felt really heavy not because it is heavy but instead since it is so tall and I was just slightly off balance.

Are there any good books for good riding technique instruction?
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 5:16:11 PM EST
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
Pics were added to the 1st post.

I got my bike today, the insurance, and some gear. I added a 4 year extended warranty so it has a 5 year warranty.

Man I gotta say this may be a little 250cc but to me it feels like it really moves. I can see why so many people hurt themselves on these things.

I've just been driving it around my country neighborhood roads and to a park that has some small trails right across from my neighborhood and gravel roads around it. The trails are way to small to even think about going fast.

I feel fairly comfortable just riding it around taking it easy. It took about 10 min for me to feel good about taking off in it though. I kept killing it or freaking taking off way to fast scaring the bejeesus out of myself. I just was not used to the clutch or the twist throttle at all. My sport 4-wheeler had a thumb throttle (I know everyone hates those). I've got a handle on mild take offs and riding around. I keep forgetting the turn signal doesn't turn off on it's own. I got it into neutral a couple of times instead of second.

I need to do better keeping track of what gear it is in. I would about 90% of the time but on some turns I wasn't totally sure so I would down shift all the way to first and then bring it back up to what I wanted before releasing the clutch.

I can say I definitely need ALOT more practice. I want to take a safety course as soon as I can. I don't think I will want to take this into town until I am alot more practiced and confident in my abilities. I also don't think I'll be taking any jumps until I have a better handle on it. I'd be scared right now with the twist throttle if I ride it to rough and take jumps It'll cause me to give it alot more throttle on accident than I mean to making me lose control.

I really had a blast riding it don't get me wrong. I am just trying to be honest with how I feel my skill level is right now. I need alot of practice.

I think I may buy I think it's called a link or linkage (I'm not sure) to make it just a tad shorter. It feels fine most of the time but once or twice when I stopped it felt really heavy not because it is heavy but instead since it is so tall and I was just slightly off balance.

Are there any good books for good riding technique instruction?


Congrats, sounds like you're having fun already.

There are a lot of good books & videos out there. A good vid for dual sports that I got alot out of is http://www.dualsportriding.com/

Proficient motorcycling is a great book too, for street and general motorcyle stuff.

I wouldn't lower the bike if you can touch comfortably at a stop - that's ideal for a dual sport. You don't need to flat foot one it's just getting used to a higher center-of-gravity. I can't really get my feet flat on my TTR250, or any dirt bike I've ever owned. Lowering it will limit your suspension.

You have, honestly, the perfect bike to learn on. Light, agile, plenty of power but not too much and if (when) you spill it, big effin deal it's a dirt bike.

Get your MSF, practice like nuts and stay out of traffic until you're comfortable. Practice everything that a motorcycle can do, and will do. Stopping, turning, panic-stops, swerving, you name it. The more comfortable you get on the bike and muscle-memory you can get into your system the better you'll transition to the street and the many "oh shits" that will throw at you. I spent a lot of time in a field really getting used to things and it's a great way to learn.

Link Posted: 3/20/2009 5:19:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2009 5:21:11 PM EST by ds3_09]
One question guys. The manual says shift to 2nd at 10mph, 3rd at 15mph, 4th at 20 mph, 5th at 25mph, and 6th at 30. I'm guessing it depends how much throttle you are giving it because it doesn't feel or sound quite right if I get in the higher gears at the speeds listed in the manual. So is it best to just go by sound and feel? That just seemed like way to soon to shift for the higher gears like it was starting to bog down some.
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 5:50:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2009 5:53:36 PM EST by IIRC]
These vids will be pretty helpful. I hope you take the time to watch them.
Keith Code's No BS Bike

How To Countersteer

ETA: Just shift by sound and feel. If you've ever heard an engine run, you'll know if you're revving too high for the gear you're in. Those shifting speeds are for optimal fuel efficiency and minimal wear on parts, not very practical.
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 5:52:14 PM EST
Sound and feel's fine for shifting - those are likely optimal economy shift points. What's it say about break in? - that's another can of worms.

Another decent DVD is Dirtwise - Shane Watts vid - decent presentation of basic skills and some useful skill drills from an offroad/trails/enduro not MX/track perspective. Simple but important stuff like body position, control operation, movement dynamics etc to riding obstacles to ascents/descents. Good production and fairly interesting. You can fast forward over the Wattsy leg humping - thats about the only complaint I hear.

Ease into it, learn your bike, develop your skills - you'll be going fast enough shortly. Just realize your limits and push them a bit. Practice the boring stuff- stop/starts, hard braking, turns, slow riding - you'll develop more than just tooling around. After a while it will be second nature as Swingset points out. Then you can fool around with wheelies and air.

Dirt's softer than tarmac, but gear up anyway. Next step is buying tools and learning to wrench.

Luck
Alac



Link Posted: 3/20/2009 7:22:42 PM EST
Outstanding!! Congrats on your new bike man!
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 7:24:57 PM EST
Anyone have a recommendation for some decent off roading boots? They were running low at the dealer and had none in my size. I don't want crap but I don't need top of the line. Please don't recommend a $500 pair of boots is what I'm trying to say.

I got a pair of gloves for riding trails, a pair for riding pavement, a helmet for trail riding, and I a scorpion jacket made for warm weather for pavement. I kinda feel goofy in the jacket but its comfortable and seems like it would protect me. I plan to get a 2nd helmet for any days I just want to ride it in to town.
Link Posted: 3/20/2009 7:36:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
Pics were added to the 1st post.

I got my bike today, the insurance, and some gear. I added a 4 year extended warranty so it has a 5 year warranty.

Man I gotta say this may be a little 250cc but to me it feels like it really moves. I can see why so many people hurt themselves on these things.

I've just been driving it around my country neighborhood roads and to a park that has some small trails right across from my neighborhood and gravel roads around it. The trails are way to small to even think about going fast.

I feel fairly comfortable just riding it around taking it easy. It took about 10 min for me to feel good about taking off in it though. I kept killing it or freaking taking off way to fast scaring the bejeesus out of myself. I just was not used to the clutch or the twist throttle at all. My sport 4-wheeler had a thumb throttle (I know everyone hates those). I've got a handle on mild take offs and riding around. I keep forgetting the turn signal doesn't turn off on it's own. I got it into neutral a couple of times instead of second.

I need to do better keeping track of what gear it is in. I would about 90% of the time but on some turns I wasn't totally sure so I would down shift all the way to first and then bring it back up to what I wanted before releasing the clutch.

I can say I definitely need ALOT more practice. I want to take a safety course as soon as I can. I don't think I will want to take this into town until I am alot more practiced and confident in my abilities. I also don't think I'll be taking any jumps until I have a better handle on it. I'd be scared right now with the twist throttle if I ride it to rough and take jumps It'll cause me to give it alot more throttle on accident than I mean to making me lose control.

I really had a blast riding it don't get me wrong. I am just trying to be honest with how I feel my skill level is right now. I need alot of practice.

I think I may buy I think it's called a link or linkage (I'm not sure) to make it just a tad shorter. It feels fine most of the time but once or twice when I stopped it felt really heavy not because it is heavy but instead since it is so tall and I was just slightly off balance.

Are there any good books for good riding technique instruction?


Your dealer should be able to lower the rear by changing the position of the rear suspension link. The bike comes set up in the taller position, though it can easily be lowered .9" without affecting suspension travel. The front end can also be raised and lowered as needed. I had mine lowered the .9" in the rear, it made a subtle change. You can also buy a "Yamalink" which lowers the rear a total of around 2" (when combined with above method). I'm 6' tall, so the Yamlink wasn't needed. BTW, great choice! I love my WR.

BTW, the OEM rear tail light is not a good fit for heavy offroading. I bought this:
http://www.wheelingcyclesupply.com/shop?action=category&cat_id=119#2626
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 4:50:06 AM EST
Anyone know if 2007 Fox Racing F3 boots are decent? I can get them for around $170.
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 5:18:37 AM EST
One thing with riding boots is you may have to move the shift lever up, then if your riding with normal shoes you have to lift your whole leg to shift. I had a paint mark on the lever area for both settings and would adjust when going off road wearing boots. Im glad you got the smaller model, it should handle well off road. Just be aware the take off wont be great on the street, even my 400s took off fast but once I almost got hit by a concrete truck getting on the freeway because you run out of power faster then a bigger bike. I almost wished I bought the kawai 250 dual sport instead of the kawi 300 I just bought few months ago but I wanted a dirt only bike. So I predict 1 yr until you get a crotch rocket where you go from shifting at 8000 rpm to 15000 rpm.

Check out thumpertalk.com
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 5:48:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/21/2009 5:49:05 AM EST by swingset]
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
Anyone know if 2007 Fox Racing F3 boots are decent? I can get them for around $170.


I had a set and found them very lacking, but YMMV.

I got a set of Forma Dominators off of atomic moto - a guy I know from ADVrider, they're awesome boots for not much more money. Equal in quality & construction to the SIDI Crossfires which retail for about $300 more than the Dominators. Plus, they have free shipping, which makes the deal even sweeter:

Click Here
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 5:16:20 PM EST
Best dual sport boot you can buy -
Sidi Discovery Rain.



Pull the toe tapps off and it's a great on/off road boot that you can also walk around with comfort.
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 9:24:41 PM EST
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 5:47:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


Not too sure about a DS, but it should be similar...
My R6 was FI, and the dealer told me it would pretty much take care of itself. They said something about disconnecting the battery for about an hour, and it would re-program if I were to drastically change riding style (like at the track, or a race, or a new exhaust system.)

Investing a few bucks in a shop manual, would really be worth it. It will show you how to do everything you could do to that bike, step by step. And FWIW, I find OEM manuals to be worth the extra money over those like Haynes, etc. YMMV
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 7:04:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By ArmyADub:
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


Not too sure about a DS, but it should be similar...
My R6 was FI, and the dealer told me it would pretty much take care of itself. They said something about disconnecting the battery for about an hour, and it would re-program if I were to drastically change riding style (like at the track, or a race, or a new exhaust system.)

Investing a few bucks in a shop manual, would really be worth it. It will show you how to do everything you could do to that bike, step by step. And FWIW, I find OEM manuals to be worth the extra money over those like Haynes, etc. YMMV

You should really buy a programmer to adjust the fuel mapping. The WR is set up to run lean and adding an aftermarket exhaust can make to fuel/air mix even more lean. FMF makes a good tuner that gets positive reviews.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 4:30:57 PM EST
DAng....wish i would have seen this thread sooner!

How dare you not buy a KLR 650!!!!!!!!!!!!

Great looking bike though.....when I was looking around I just wasn't comfortable with the aircooled engines. I do mostly street and was worried about engine heat while sitting at lights.

Anyway welcome to the club!!

Here is mine, 2009 KLR 650


Link Posted: 3/22/2009 5:05:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By brasilia:
Great looking bike though.....when I was looking around I just wasn't comfortable with the aircooled engines. I do mostly street and was worried about engine heat while sitting at lights.


The WR250r is liquid cooled. That is a nice looking bike you have!

Link Posted: 3/22/2009 5:29:30 PM EST
If I eventually get a exhaust system do I need a different air filter? I am just curious as I would prefer to not go to something like K&N since it lets more particles through.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 7:51:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/23/2009 10:35:02 AM EST by KA3B]
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


First thing you need to do is leave here because 99% of the advice that you're gonna get from here on out is going to be compete ass-fucked shit-stained non-sense.

Here's 200+ pages dedicated to the Yamaha on Adventure rider -
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=329337

Here's an entire forum dedicated to Yamaha Dual Sport bikes (including the WR25R) -
http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=384

If you don't recalibrate the injection on the WR250R you will not get the most out of the bike.
It can not compensate for the freer-flowing exhaust or an aftermarket air filter.

I like K&N's, but I will NEVER again run one on a dirt bike.
Twinair, Uni or even the stock airfilters work better.

Read those forums, join up and ask questions.

Edit to add - Swingset is a 1%'er.


Link Posted: 3/23/2009 3:13:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


First thing you need to do is leave here because 99% of the advice that you're gonna get from here on out is going to be compete ass-fucked shit-stained non-sense.



Dunno if I'd say 99% of the advice here is nonsense - any more than I'd say ADVrider is the ultimate source for it, cause I've read some god-awful stupid bullshit there passed off as someone's authority. I think you should take any internet advice for what you paid for it.

ADV a good site tho, but there's a large contingent of noob bashers, flaming libtards, and cliquish dicks that think they own the place so read a lot before you post. Check out the regional forums, you probably have some local riders or people close to you that will be a good resource - I'd also suggest Thumpertalk for single-cylinder bike advice. A lot more racing-geared individuals, but there's some great info there too especially on jetting & intake issues.

Link Posted: 3/23/2009 5:47:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


First thing you need to do is leave here because 99% of the advice that you're gonna get from here on out is going to be compete ass-fucked shit-stained non-sense.



that there is funny......I don' care what you ride!
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 2:43:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By swingset:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


First thing you need to do is leave here because 99% of the advice that you're gonna get from here on out is going to be compete ass-fucked shit-stained non-sense.



Dunno if I'd say 99% of the advice here is nonsense - any more than I'd say ADVrider is the ultimate source for it, cause I've read some god-awful stupid bullshit there passed off as someone's authority. I think you should take any internet advice for what you paid for it.

ADV a good site tho, but there's a large contingent of noob bashers, flaming libtards, and cliquish dicks that think they own the place so read a lot before you post. Check out the regional forums, you probably have some local riders or people close to you that will be a good resource - I'd also suggest Thumpertalk for single-cylinder bike advice. A lot more racing-geared individuals, but there's some great info there too especially on jetting & intake issues.



I resemble those remarks!


Just stay outta da basement, especially CS&M, it'll make yer tummy hurt
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 10:43:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/24/2009 11:00:02 AM EST by ds3_09]
I ordered a yamalink, skid plate, tail light kit and flashers, a helmet for street/commuting use, those Sidi Discovery Rain boots, a utility trailer, and a wheel chock.

I am holding off on any performance upgrades. My questions were simply for future reference. I am clean out of money anyways for now.

I picked up a ramp for my truck at Harbor freight but tit just wasn't going to work. I could easily load it with a friend but I am just to weak by myself. I tried idling it into the truck on the ramp but my arms were so stretched out at the top I could hardly manage it well I could see myself having a very bad day doing this enough times. I really don't want to ride it into the bed up the ramp. My driveways is gravel with a very low gradient so it doesn't make loading easier like a steep driveway would. I hated to drop the coin on a trailer but I think it is just the best way to go for me so I don't need a buddy to help.

Link Posted: 3/24/2009 10:48:55 AM EST
ADVRider is like Pirate 4x4 - if you're technically proficient, great place to hone ideas, But elements aint real friendly towards "new to the scene" guys. Thumpertalk seems to be somewhat better. Regardless lots of good info both places - just run it through your common sense screen

I have Sidi Discos - they are great boots - both of us chasing Dakar wore them, Comfortable on pegs, off, or walking, - and offer reasonable protection overall. Since they are waterproof, they dont breathe real well. I'd avoid cotton socks. They are compromise boots tho - they dont offer much ankle protection - but that's why they are comfortable. I wear other boots if I'm seriously exerting myself - but they arent nearly as livable off bike as the Discos. Sidis put up with a lot of abuse - you may be able to find some cheap if thats what you want. Gaerne is another top notch boot.

I havnt had the Formas on - seems to be a decent boot, but try some brands/models on local, all depends on what fits and your intentions. Look around the net, plenty of deals to be had once you've found something that works.

Swingset - hows the Ebay Forma guy handle returns?
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 12:08:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By Alacrity:

Swingset - hows the Ebay Forma guy handle returns?


He's great with CS, from what I've read. Luckily, mine fit perfectly and I didn't need to return them but I read some threads where people had issues with fit and he let them return & shipped new boots pronto.

Link Posted: 3/24/2009 12:27:25 PM EST
Ths Swinset Good to know - but DS scored the Sidi's. Think you'll be happy if they fit. Might be a bit narrow.

Let us know how you are enjoying the new ride. At this point, I wouldn't go all out on perf - you've got plenty of power. See if you need more

Link Posted: 3/29/2009 5:33:49 PM EST
Sounds like the OP is going to have a summer he is going to remember for a while. ..

There are few things more exciting than a new bike!
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 7:33:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By TruckinAR:
Originally Posted By swingset:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By ds3_09:
So if I got an exhaust kit or slip on what would need to be done for the fuel injection? I know when I added an exhaust to my Honda 400ex I had to rejet the carburetor. What the heck do you do to something with fuel injection?


First thing you need to do is leave here because 99% of the advice that you're gonna get from here on out is going to be compete ass-fucked shit-stained non-sense.



Dunno if I'd say 99% of the advice here is nonsense - any more than I'd say ADVrider is the ultimate source for it, cause I've read some god-awful stupid bullshit there passed off as someone's authority. I think you should take any internet advice for what you paid for it.

ADV a good site tho, but there's a large contingent of noob bashers, flaming libtards, and cliquish dicks that think they own the place so read a lot before you post. Check out the regional forums, you probably have some local riders or people close to you that will be a good resource - I'd also suggest Thumpertalk for single-cylinder bike advice. A lot more racing-geared individuals, but there's some great info there too especially on jetting & intake issues.



I resemble those remarks!


Just stay outta da basement, especially CS&M, it'll make yer tummy hurt
What makes my tummy hurt is that really nice setup for your bike behind the cab of the big truck! How does it work?

Top Top