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Posted: 5/17/2005 9:09:35 AM EDT
My wife is finally interested in getting a handgun, primarily for home defense when she is there alone. She has vitually no prior experience with owning or shooting, other than once when I got her to shoot my Beretta Cougar 9MM. Size and trigger pull are major considerations since she is 4'11" and weighs 93 pounds (the trigger pull on the Beretta is too heavy for her in DA mode). Any suggestions re. model, SA or revolver, etc?
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 9:50:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TXSunDvl:
My wife is finally interested in getting a handgun, primarily for home defense when she is there alone. She has vitually no prior experience with owning or shooting, other than once when I got her to shoot my Beretta Cougar 9MM. Size and trigger pull are major considerations since she is 4'11" and weighs 93 pounds (the trigger pull on the Beretta is too heavy for her in DA mode). Any suggestions re. model, SA or revolver, etc?



I know a lady of that size wo handles a full size 1911 .45 with ease. Take her down to the store and have her fondle the handguns. It's the best way to choose one. My wife (5'1" and 125#) can handle my Delta Elite with no problems but she prefers a Glock 17 (without the finger grooves) and the Kahr K9 pistols.

If you can arrange for your wife to shoot the models of guns she likes the feel of; that's even better.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 9:56:53 AM EDT
My wife like the S&W Model 60 3" .357 loaded with .38 Special +p but since S&W has starting installing those trigger locks in the frame if I were buying now I would be more interested in the Ruger Sp101 3".
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 10:10:51 AM EDT
how about a S&W snub .38 w/ concealed hammer?...trigger pull isn't too bad, small enough to fit her hands(assuming since she's 4'11") and small enough to keep in her purse if she wanted to take it with her to the store or the mall or whereever
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 11:36:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DesertRat66:

Take her down to the store and have her fondle the handguns. It's the best way to choose one. My wife (5'1" and 125#) can handle my Delta Elite with no problems but she prefers a Glock 17 (without the finger grooves) and the Kahr K9 pistols.

If you can arrange for your wife to shoot the models of guns she likes the feel of; that's even better.



I completely agree with this - this is what I recommend to all of the women who come to my clinics, and all of the men who have emailed me with just this same question. Give her the chance to handle the guns and "feel" which one she likes, then rent the two or three she liked best while holding them and let her decide which one feels best for her. If she chooses it, and she likes it she will be more comfortable with it. Also, spring for a pistol class for her. A lot of the women who come to my clinics have husbands who shoot, who have tried to get them out for years; almost all of them have said they feel more comfortable learning from someone else - its not that husbands are bad teachers, but that the desire to please adds another layer of stress and destraction to the process.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 11:51:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LdyGunner:

Originally Posted By DesertRat66:

Take her down to the store and have her fondle the handguns. It's the best way to choose one. My wife (5'1" and 125#) can handle my Delta Elite with no problems but she prefers a Glock 17 (without the finger grooves) and the Kahr K9 pistols.

If you can arrange for your wife to shoot the models of guns she likes the feel of; that's even better.



I completely agree with this - this is what I recommend to all of the women who come to my clinics, and all of the men who have emailed me with just this same question. Give her the chance to handle the guns and "feel" which one she likes, then rent the two or three she liked best while holding them and let her decide which one feels best for her. If she chooses it, and she likes it she will be more comfortable with it. Also, spring for a pistol class for her. A lot of the women who come to my clinics have husbands who shoot, who have tried to get them out for years; almost all of them have said they feel more comfortable learning from someone else - its not that husbands are bad teachers, but that the desire to please adds another layer of stress and destraction to the process.



I have to second(or would I be thirding, is that even a word?) that advice seeing that I was going to give basicly the same advice.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 12:22:33 PM EDT
SIG P239 in .40

Glocks...ick
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 1:03:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SigZiggy:
SIG P239 in .40

Glocks...ick



+1 to all of that. SigZiggy is wise.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 5:43:37 PM EDT
If I could, I'd take her to an course where they provide the guns, then she can try a whole bunch and you don't have to clean them. She'll have fun (i hope) and learn about shooting.

In Ohio try Canton-McKindley Rifle and Pistol Club, or I just shot at a IDPA club that has Thursday night member fun shooting. they do free training as well. Google "Greenport Tactical Association" and I'm sure you can find a map. I drove down with a budy and i wasn't paying any attention to were we going, too many late work nights.

I also heard about a course just for women on handguns, My girlfriend took it and had a ball. She want to shoot now.

E-mail BHPgirl@yahoo.com for more information.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 6:40:41 PM EDT
a while back I started a thread on different options and this is what I got:

Link

Patty
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 7:35:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GabbasaurusRex:

Originally Posted By SigZiggy:
SIG P239 in .40

Glocks...ick



+1 to all of that. SigZiggy is wise.



I second that motion.

Take her to the range and have her shoot different types. Maybe she'll find something that she's comfortable holding and shooting. Better than to buy one and have her not like it. (Not that you wouldn't keep it for yourself, of course, but still. )
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:50:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 3:48:46 AM EDT
Myself, I tend to think more about capacity , including ease of reloading, so wouldn't use a revolver for anything other than back-up or when an SA isn't feasible enough to wear.

The weapon will become second nature with enough training and practice. If it's being used before it's second nature, it could very easily just get taken away from you before it gets used. After she's trained a while, make sure she's really "ready" to pull that trigger if it comes down to that. Shooting paper is a lot different than shooting a person, even when it's in self defense.

Keep us posted on her progress!
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 5:16:56 AM EDT
A nice 38 is pretty dern easy to handle and load and with speed loaders re-load. Home defense - the best thing she can have is a shotgun. The ratchet of a shotgun can deter most crimes.

Patty
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 5:36:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SigZiggy:
SIG P239 in .40

Glocks...ick



Hey! You got a problem with back plastic? I like my Glock 23.



But alas, I am new and have not had the pleasure of trying a P239. Maybe if someday given the chance I will see the light. They sure are purty.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 6:39:26 AM EDT
I can't believe how expensive these things are! I've been toying with a new CCW. I'd like something way smaller than my 1911 but still in the .45 cal range. I just about hock up a kidney though when I see how much they are. I think I might just think of a handier way to conceal my 1911 and be done with it [I have a fanny pack and I hate it].

Patty
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 7:27:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TXSunDvl:
My wife is finally interested in getting a handgun, primarily for home defense when she is there alone. She has vitually no prior experience with owning or shooting, other than once when I got her to shoot my Beretta Cougar 9MM. Size and trigger pull are major considerations since she is 4'11" and weighs 93 pounds (the trigger pull on the Beretta is too heavy for her in DA mode). Any suggestions re. model, SA or revolver, etc?



Is your wife willing to invest a substantial amount of time at the range?

If so, a much wider range of options becomes available. If not, a revolver seems to be in order.

Is she is willing to put forth the effort, then a nice single action becomes an option. My wife (5'7" 125 lbs) shoots my Browning Hi Powers very well. She is not nearly as accurate with her S&W snubby (understandably). She used to have my Glock 17 jam on her (she was limp wristing, but I think we cured that -need to put time in at the range!). A larger, heavier handgun at hoime seems good - less perceived recoil and muzzle flip. It needs to be something she feels good about.

And as Patty mentioned, a shotgun would be a great option as well - probably a 20ga pump.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 8:47:55 AM EDT
I just bought a Taurus 24/7. I handled many, and really felt the 24/7 was best. The grip felt parfect, the weight was manageable. Perhaps she should check it out too. I went to 3 stores and handled many. It's hard to decide when there are so many options, but when i wasa holding that Taurus, I definitely felt more comfortable.
On to step two of finding a class to attend.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 9:38:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:38:40 PM EDT
Thanks to all for you comments/suggestions. Unfortunately, I don't know of any gun shops in Houston that have a selection of guns to shoot before buying. I do feel that it is important that she at least get the feel of the weapon first. I probably agree with those who suggested a revolver, as it is more fool-proof for someone who will not spend a lot of time practicing (hoping I'm wrong here and that she'll enjoy shooting).

A shotgun is a good idea for in the house, but she wants to be able to have a weapon accessible in the back yard.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:41:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/18/2005 12:51:14 PM EDT by criley]

Originally Posted By Miss_Magnum:

Originally Posted By criley:
Is your wife willing to invest a substantial amount of time at the range?

If so, a much wider range of options becomes available. If not, a revolver seems to be in order.



Which is exactly my point.... SA requires a lot more practice to become familiar with the bells and whistles. He's already indicated that shooting doesn't seem to be a hobby she's going to be picking up anytime soon.


And as Patty mentioned, a shotgun would be a great option as well - probably a 20ga pump.


Agreed.



He didn't say that. He said she hasn't been interested in the past, but that now she is interested in a handgun for self defense at home. He did say the double action trigger pull of a Cougar was too much for her. She will not enjoy the long, hard trigger pull of a double action revolver.

If her interest is sufficient to invest a certain amount of time, then she is not going to be limited to a revolver. She will need even MORE time to become proficient at hitting the target with a revolver than a Glock or Hi Power.

SA or Glock: less time to learn to hit what you are aiming at, more time to become a safe user

Revolver: more time to learn to hit a target, but less time to become a safe handler.

If she is willing to spend the time and money, a .22 conversion for a Glock or Hi Power, along with the 9mm or 40S&W pistol would be a great combo. Do a lot of practice with the .22, and some with the other. If manipulating the safety is a concern, go with a Glock.

You can also get one of those gun safes with fingertip pads ... can get in it in 2 secs or less. Gun is loaded and ready to go. Pull it out and use it. You can also put a light on the end of a Glock.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:32:11 PM EDT
You know when I was at the police acadamy it was the rovolvers that were top guns. They seemed much more proficient then the semi autos? Slow, heavy and cumbersome yes but I was top gun with my 357 S&W and I had several men trying to make sure they weren't beat by a woman.

Patty
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 2:48:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 4:42:37 PM EDT
Myself, I tend to shoot low...right about dead center groin area
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 9:03:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SigZiggy:
Myself, I tend to shoot low...right about dead center groin area



That should teach em!

Patty
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 7:26:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 10:07:52 AM EDT
Revolvers are very accurate. The issue is with the double action trigger pull. A person will generally shoot a SA pistol more accurately than a revolver in double action. It isn't the weapon's accuracy it is the fact that a lighter, shorter trigger is much easier to shoot.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 10:40:30 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 11:15:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Miss_Magnum:
My .41 magnum has the hammer filed off. It's called "lawyer proofing".....



Its never lawyer-proof...I'm sure a lawyer could still manage to shoot himself in the foot with it.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 12:09:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 12:13:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LdyGunner:
I completely agree with this - this is what I recommend to all of the women who come to my clinics, and all of the men who have emailed me with just this same question. Give her the chance to handle the guns and "feel" which one she likes, then rent the two or three she liked best while holding them and let her decide which one feels best for her. If she chooses it, and she likes it she will be more comfortable with it. Also, spring for a pistol class for her. A lot of the women who come to my clinics have husbands who shoot, who have tried to get them out for years; almost all of them have said they feel more comfortable learning from someone else - its not that husbands are bad teachers, but that the desire to please adds another layer of stress and destraction to the process.



Men forget the most basic of things when teaching their Sensitive Significant Other to shoot. Praise, Praise, Praise, and constructively criticize. You have to make learning to shoot a very positive experience for them. I have taught many girlfriends and my wife to shoot. While my wife doesn't like to shoot as much as I do she is very capable with a firearm.

One lady I taught to shoot even wound up beating me at a pistol match. I consider that a very proud moment for both of us.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 12:46:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Miss_Magnum:
Are you speaking from personal experience, Shaggy?




Well, as much as I've shot myself in the foot before, its never been with a gun.


I'm generally able to contain my stupidity when around firearms to just pulling dumbass moves like grabbing red hot barrels with bare hands...
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 5:41:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TXSunDvl:
Thanks to all for you comments/suggestions. Unfortunately, I don't know of any gun shops in Houston that have a selection of guns to shoot before buying. I do feel that it is important that she at least get the feel of the weapon first. I probably agree with those who suggested a revolver, as it is more fool-proof for someone who will not spend a lot of time practicing (hoping I'm wrong here and that she'll enjoy shooting).

A shotgun is a good idea for in the house, but she wants to be able to have a weapon accessible in the back yard.



If you and the wife aren't anti-gay, I'd suggest getting in touch w/the Houston area Pink Pistols, find out where they meet, and go to the next meeting. I know WE always (Columbus, Ohio Chapter) have a LARGE pool of firearms to choose from, and I'm sure they'd let her at LEAST try 1/2 dozen rounds each type... Contact the "leader" I know him as eyeb3x3.... I might have his real name here somewhere.... "warn" him that you are bringing a "newbie" who is looking to purchase something for self defense, and if he could bring what he has, and encourage other attendees to do the same... You'll come up w/a good "fit" I'd bet.

If you (or she) are anti-gay, don't you folks have some sort of "shooting clubs" `round those parts where a similar sort of occurance could happen?

Link Posted: 5/20/2005 9:40:28 PM EDT
I really have a hard time when I hear of an inexperienced person wanting to buy a firearm for “home defense”, “personal defense” or any other type of defense. Especially when followed with “I’m to little to shoot that.”
No one I know of would hand the keys to ANY vehicle over to a teenager and say “go to it. You don’t need to practice driving because this is a safer vehicle than that one. It practically drives itself.” So why is it ok to do it with a firearm?

Whatever she decides on, if she is unskilled and plans on protecting her life with it, she should take and class and learn how to use it in her sleep. It won’t, as in will not, matter (about trigger pull, safeties, 16 rounds of 9mm or 6 rounds of 00 buck) if she is shaking in her slippers, disoriented, only fired it “that one time” when you showed her how and the bad guy wrenches it from her hand.

Anyone that takes on the responsibility of owning a firearm (especially for protection) should be proficient with the handling and use of it, IMO. They should be able to buy the correct ammunition for it and know the difference in carry loads and target loads. Just like you teach a teen the correct fuel for a vehicle, it’s about being responsible and capable. If you have ten smoke detectors per room and none of them have batteries and no one has practiced a fire drill then you might as well just lay there, praying some hand will descend from heaven and save you.

It’s the same thing with a firearm in the night stand drawer. DA, SA, .38 S&W or .44 Mag, three safeties or zero, if she thinks she can pull it from a drawer and will suddenly become competent with it under stress then she may as well just arm herself with harsh language or a good security system and a Rottweiler. Again, this is my opinion. I have never looked at firearms as hobbies but as useful tools in a “God forbid” situation.
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 10:17:13 PM EDT
Word sister...you are speakin my language
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