Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 8/8/2002 11:42:01 AM EST
Here's a question for all you electricians out there. Can I connect two strings of GFCI outlets in parallel and juice them from the same breaker, as in the following wiring diagram? [img]www.dimensional.com/~mwluse/gfci.jpg[/img] Thanks!
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 12:38:21 PM EST
I am no electrician, but I have a question, wouldn't you have to have 2 gfci breakers in the circuit then? The plug that has the breaker I mean, not the main circuit breaker at the panel.
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 12:38:23 PM EST
Marvl, If you want each gfci to work independently then you wire each of them on the "line" side only, no "load" connections. You can also just use 2 gfci's. Make the first plug a gfci, come off of the "load" side of the gfci to wire up the other regular plugs. The first gfci will protect the plugs. Understand? What are you using these for?
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 12:41:41 PM EST
Marvl, If you want each gfci to work independently then you wire each of them on the "line" side only, no "load" connections. You can also just use 2 gfci's. Make the first plug a gfci, come off of the "load" side of the gfci to wire up the other regular plugs. The first gfci will protect the plugs. Understand? What are you using these for? You could also use 1 gfci breaker for all of the plugs too.
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 12:43:41 PM EST
You aren't putting two wires under the screws of the breaker are you? You can't do that. You can only run one wire under each of the screws. With that done lets go on. Its legal to protect multiple outlets downstream, as long as you follow all of the requirements for wire gauge, connections, boxes, etc. One way you could accomplish the two sets of parallel outlets it to put a J-box away from the breaker and branch the circuit. One warning though. Although there is nothing in the NEC about running two parallel sets of outlets, it does make it harder for the inspector to check. No matter what the NEC says, some inspectors want it done their way. If possible run a single string to apease them.
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 12:43:51 PM EST
You should compare the cost of those 6 GFCI receptacles to one GFCI circuit breaker to protect the whole circuit.
Link Posted: 8/8/2002 1:20:24 PM EST
Okay, thanks for the info. This is for wiring outlets in the basement, where GFCIs are required (specifically a workshop I am finishing off). I have one unused 20-amp circuit coming in. I want to split into 2 parallel feeds (inside a box, not at the breaker). I'll make the first outlet on each branch a 20-amp line, 20-amp passthrough GFCI, then all down-stream outlets normal 20-amp outlets. I already have the GFCI outlets, so no need to buy a GFCI breaker. Thanks for the info.
Top Top