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1/16/2020 9:48:49 PM
Posted: 1/17/2015 5:35:12 PM EST
Are the super fancy furnace air filters that cost 4x more than the regular type worthwhile?

The "600" filters are $8 each.

The "1200" filters are $20 each.

The "2200" filters are $30 each.

And than there's other filters that use a different measurement called "MERV". MERV 8 and MERV 12.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:37:12 PM EST
yes. 1500 microns are worth the money.
Especially with pets in the house.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:39:14 PM EST
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:41:33 PM EST
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Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
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My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:43:43 PM EST
16X25X5 MERV 10 or 12 FTMFW.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:44:07 PM EST
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:

My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.

My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.

This. The purpose of the filter is to protect your equipment. Unless you have another problem to solve, buy the ~$6 filter from Amazon.
I usually replace mine every 6-8 weeks.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:45:42 PM EST
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Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
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I'll 3rd this. My buddy is an hvac guy. Tells me to stick with the spun glass ones
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:47:41 PM EST
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Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
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true story
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:48:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/17/2015 5:49:11 PM EST by TheKill]
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.


The only thing that has to work a little harder is your blower motor due to the resistance of drawing air through a filter with slightly more resistance. It's there but not a huge deal. You could probably measure it by measuring your current draw at the motor in amps with a normal filter and then with one of the good ones if you are concerned about it.

Heating grid/gas supply/ignitor/thermostat? No effect at all.

A/C compressor, refrigerant, cooling coils, condenser? No effect at all.

FWIW, they will also tell you it's bad to run it without a filter at all......

Indoor air quality is pretty important, especially since you are more apt to spend time indoors when the weather is bad, that's when your HVAC runs the most. I run the 1200s due to two dogs and a cat, as well as living in a dusty desert, and I noticed an immediate improvement in air quality as well as better sleeping and less sinus trouble.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:51:43 PM EST
Did you know that ordinary house dust is composed primarily of human skin?
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:52:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TheKill:


The only thing that has to work a little harder is your blower motor due to the resistance of drawing air through a filter with slightly more resistance. It's there but not a huge deal. You could probably measure it by measuring your current draw at the motor in amps with a normal filter and then with one of the good ones if you are concerned about it.

Heating grid/gas supply/ignitor/thermostat? No effect at all.

A/C compressor, refrigerant, cooling coils, condenser? No effect at all.

FWIW, they will also tell you it's bad to run it without a filter at all......

Indoor air quality is pretty important, especially since you are more apt to spend time indoors when the weather is bad, that's when your HVAC runs the most. I run the 1200s due to two dogs and a cat, as well as living in a dusty desert, and I noticed an immediate improvement in air quality as well as better sleeping and less sinus trouble.
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Originally Posted By TheKill:
Originally Posted By oogabooga289:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.


The only thing that has to work a little harder is your blower motor due to the resistance of drawing air through a filter with slightly more resistance. It's there but not a huge deal. You could probably measure it by measuring your current draw at the motor in amps with a normal filter and then with one of the good ones if you are concerned about it.

Heating grid/gas supply/ignitor/thermostat? No effect at all.

A/C compressor, refrigerant, cooling coils, condenser? No effect at all.

FWIW, they will also tell you it's bad to run it without a filter at all......

Indoor air quality is pretty important, especially since you are more apt to spend time indoors when the weather is bad, that's when your HVAC runs the most. I run the 1200s due to two dogs and a cat, as well as living in a dusty desert, and I noticed an immediate improvement in air quality as well as better sleeping and less sinus trouble.

I have trouble breathing occasionally , so I'm wondering if I should upgrade. I'm just running the cheap non-glass type right now (600 filtration, or there about).
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:54:32 PM EST
Unless you have a bad dust and pollen allergy, the lower and mid grades do ok. That's what I use. I'm not sure if the that upper grade filter will filter down far enough to get the pollen. I do know they can be very expensive to use.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:56:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/17/2015 5:58:53 PM EST by oogabooga289]
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Originally Posted By TheKill:


The only thing that has to work a little harder is your blower motor due to the resistance of drawing air through a filter with slightly more resistance. It's there but not a huge deal. You could probably measure it by measuring your current draw at the motor in amps with a normal filter and then with one of the good ones if you are concerned about it.

Heating grid/gas supply/ignitor/thermostat? No effect at all.

A/C compressor, refrigerant, cooling coils, condenser? No effect at all.

FWIW, they will also tell you it's bad to run it without a filter at all......

Indoor air quality is pretty important, especially since you are more apt to spend time indoors when the weather is bad, that's when your HVAC runs the most. I run the 1200s due to two dogs and a cat, as well as living in a dusty desert, and I noticed an immediate improvement in air quality as well as better sleeping and less sinus trouble.
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Originally Posted By TheKill:
Originally Posted By oogabooga289:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.


The only thing that has to work a little harder is your blower motor due to the resistance of drawing air through a filter with slightly more resistance. It's there but not a huge deal. You could probably measure it by measuring your current draw at the motor in amps with a normal filter and then with one of the good ones if you are concerned about it.

Heating grid/gas supply/ignitor/thermostat? No effect at all.

A/C compressor, refrigerant, cooling coils, condenser? No effect at all.

FWIW, they will also tell you it's bad to run it without a filter at all......

Indoor air quality is pretty important, especially since you are more apt to spend time indoors when the weather is bad, that's when your HVAC runs the most. I run the 1200s due to two dogs and a cat, as well as living in a dusty desert, and I noticed an immediate improvement in air quality as well as better sleeping and less sinus trouble.


How would you know the peak continuous current of the motor? Even there was one published by the furnace manufacturer, things like airflow over and ambient temp affect this rating as well.

ETA: not saying that air quality is not important. Just wondering how you the information would help determining if it's bad for the motor or not.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 6:26:41 PM EST

I had my HVAC system replaced last year. I have a Gas Pack.

The techs told me that they call those cheap spun filters "rock catchers" because that's all they really will catch.

I use a filter now with a Merv of 4. That seems to be a good balance between filtration and air flow.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 6:31:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.
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Originally Posted By oogabooga289:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


My coworker who just had his furnace replaced had the HVAC guy say this to him, too.

Gotta change them.

And you will need to account for the increased pressure drop across the filter media. This is usually remedied with a larger size filter rack.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 6:44:59 PM EST
Remember the filter

Excellent service, excellent selection, best prices I could find on 20x25x2
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 6:53:40 PM EST
that they are overpriced shit
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:00:57 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
Did you know that ordinary house dust is composed primarily of human skin?
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How much is aerosolized poo from unclosed toilet flushes?
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:25:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Rebel442:


I'll 3rd this. My buddy is an hvac guy. Tells me to stick with the spun glass ones
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Originally Posted By Rebel442:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


I'll 3rd this. My buddy is an hvac guy. Tells me to stick with the spun glass ones


I've had 2 different HVAC guys tell me the same thing...MERV 7 is good enough. I change them every 4-6 months, because that's how long it takes them to get dirty.
Besides, a dirty filter cleans better than a new one.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:30:03 PM EST
They can screw up your A/C and furnace by not letting enough air flow! Buy and use at your on risk!
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:36:18 PM EST
No.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:41:28 PM EST
Do you have allergies or other breathing problems? That'll tell you which filter to buy.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 7:44:46 PM EST
Get both?
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:15:28 PM EST
I just bought a bunch of the high end (MERV 14, and some MERV 10) filters....

I guess we'll see how they work out.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:15:48 PM EST
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Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
View Quote


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:22:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.

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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.



Are these any good?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0073HA12A
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:23:18 PM EST
Your not going to get a good answer. The cheaper filters are less of a strain on your system but don't filter as much dust. The expensive filters do filter out much more but put more strain on your system unless you change them often. The expensive filters get more expensive when you realize how quickly they get dirty. Filters are cheaper than a new hvac system.

What causes more harm, harder working system or dirty system? I don't know the answer but I generally use a mid range 800ish micron filter and change them at least once a month. Longer in the winter because I rarely run my system. I think it is a good trade off but i also don't have allergies.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:27:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Undefined:


Are these any good?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0073HA12A
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Originally Posted By Undefined:
Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.



Are these any good?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0073HA12A


Very good in a residential application & not too expensive either.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:29:00 PM EST
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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:


Very good in a residential application & not too expensive either.
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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:
Originally Posted By Undefined:
Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.



Are these any good?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0073HA12A


Very good in a residential application & not too expensive either.


Good to hear.

I paid $35.52 per 12 pack.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 8:40:03 PM EST
I've been a HVAC service tech since '94. It's all about air flow. Your system is designed to deliver its performance at a specific static pressure. Surface are is key. I recommend a four inch pleated filter, such as a space guard. The blue spun filters will only stop shit that won't pass thru the coil. Pleated filters are best. You can stack pleated and carbon filters if the static pressure can be maintained.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 10:30:49 PM EST
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Originally Posted By cpl0313:
I've been a HVAC service tech since '94. It's all about air flow. Your system is designed to deliver its performance at a specific static pressure. Surface are is key. I recommend a four inch pleated filter, such as a space guard. The blue spun filters will only stop shit that won't pass thru the coil. Pleated filters are best. You can stack pleated and carbon filters if the static pressure can be maintained.
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I don't have much choice in the size of filter I can run, as it's a welded part directly on the furnace. The filter size is 16x25x1/
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 10:36:48 PM EST
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Originally Posted By targettarget:

I don't have much choice in the size of filter I can run, as it's a welded part directly on the furnace. The filter size is 16x25x1/
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Originally Posted By targettarget:
Originally Posted By cpl0313:
I've been a HVAC service tech since '94. It's all about air flow. Your system is designed to deliver its performance at a specific static pressure. Surface are is key. I recommend a four inch pleated filter, such as a space guard. The blue spun filters will only stop shit that won't pass thru the coil. Pleated filters are best. You can stack pleated and carbon filters if the static pressure can be maintained.

I don't have much choice in the size of filter I can run, as it's a welded part directly on the furnace. The filter size is 16x25x1/
The filter box is a add on, remove current filter, add space guard or equivalent and rock on.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 12:04:02 AM EST
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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.

View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By UnclePaulie:
Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.


Not just wrong but totally wrong. All residential HVAC units have a "forward curve" type indoor fan, meaning the power consumption actually goes down as the air-flow resistance increases.
If your HVAC guy was union trained, he would know that
Any MERV filter is good, cheapo filters are not. The best filters are 100% carbon, not just carbon infused..but are very expensive, I've installed these is bars & nightclubs to remove smoke / odor.


Restricting airflow is what I would call putting a strain on the system. Sure, a psc motor will draw less current, but airflow will decrease which can cause a gas furnace to over heat putting strain on things like the heat exchanger. Why do you think heat exchangers crack? In the case of ac, reducing airflow can cause the coil to freeze, which will result in liquid flooding back to the compressor, yep more strain. Furthermore, most of the systems I install these days have whats called an ecm motor, or variable speed motor which will speed up to accommodate higher static pressures in the system. This is great up to a point, but the motor use exponentially more power as resistance increases. The correct answer to op's question is: it depends. Most systems I see are not able to accommodate these "super allergen" type 1 inch filters. If indoor air quality is a concern, have a decent media air cleaner installed or if you like maintenance, an electronic air cleaner is okay.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 12:23:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 12:27:05 AM EST by gtfoxy]
I use minimum 1200.

My HVAC guy told me the same thing with regards to the free flowing filters.... Knowing how people like to have reasons for things...

UDC code requires flow balancing by the HVAC company & verification by the inspector. So after setting the balanced flow, I asked my inspector to do a little experiment for me. He was happy to help test my hypothesis. I ran two different filters in my furnace, one was the basic & one uberfilter. The difference in airflow according to his little flow-a-mc jobber showed next to no change in flow at the register. Turns out the greater system ducting poses more restriction than the filter type used. At least that was his explanation of the test data.

Link Posted: 1/18/2015 12:27:36 AM EST
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Originally Posted By lostnswv:
According to my HVAC guy, the fancy airfilter do one thing really well, put a strain on your system.
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Because it was designed with a filter too small for the CFM of the system from day 1.
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