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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/14/2004 11:16:58 AM EST
I know from reading posts here over time that there are a fair amount of people who grew up in foreign lands.

For those who now take up residence here in the states...

1. What country were you originally from and how long did you live there?

2. What were your reasons for leaving?

3. Has living in the U.S. been what you expected? Anything exceed your expectations? Anything not meet your expectations? Any serious disapointments about our society?

4. What do you miss most about the country you left? Any aspects about that culture and people in general that you find superior to that in the U.S.?

Thank you for your time.



Link Posted: 10/14/2004 11:32:40 AM EST
HAHAHHA! Do you really think with the attitude most people have on this web site that anyone is going to admit hes a foreigner??? No freakin way! ps- all foreigners, ROUS!!
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 11:46:53 AM EST
It is my understanding that EdSr. is Cuban...afterall...and yes...several have "admitted" already.


Originally Posted By t-stox:
HAHAHHA! Do you really think with the attitude most people have on this web site that anyone is going to admit hes a foreigner??? No freakin way! ps- all foreigners, ROUS!!

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 11:48:14 AM EST
Dk-Prof admits to being Dutch, and he moved here. Maybe he will tell us why.

It was probably because of all the racket those wooden shoes make.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 11:49:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By t-stox:
HAHAHHA! Do you really think with the attitude most people have on this web site that anyone is going to admit hes a foreigner??? No freakin way! ps- all foreigners, ROUS!!




You ain't that bright are you?


Sgatr15
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 11:50:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 11:51:09 AM EST by eodtech2000]

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
Dk-Prof admits to being Dutch, and he moved here. Maybe he will tell us why.

It was probably because of all the racket those wooden shoes make.



You sure, I thought he was Swedish.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:24:10 PM EST
1. Hong Kong, My grandpa that was a mechanic in WWII was our sponser. My grandfather finally reunited with his wife after a 46 year separation. How awkward is that?
Family came in 1965 so I was 1 when we emigrated to NYC. The family would have come sooner but there was a ban on specifically Chinese immigration for a long time till LBJ repealed the immigration laws.

2. Public education in Hong Kong was pretty bad and my folks couldn't afford private schools. Jobs opportunitys weren't that great and private homes are insanely expensive.

3. Been what I expected and exceeded it. It took a while for my folks to get their own home, 6 years of scrimping and saving but they got it. Paid $12,000 in 71 and just got offered $280,000 recently.
Too many people expect it to be easy. I have lots of respect for hard working immigrants but none for the slackers who where born here.

4. I have no clue, I was a baby and went back once. My folks miss the part of not being the foreigner everywhere they go outside of NYC.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:28:56 PM EST
Yes, DK-Prof is most definitely 100% Dutch. He readily admits it. He even posted a picture of his Dutch military uniform. He's quite proud of being Dutch, you know...

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:41:59 PM EST
You definately have the coolest avatar on this board.


Originally Posted By twonami:
1. Hong Kong, My grandpa that was a mechanic in WWII was our sponser. My grandfather finally reunited with his wife after a 46 year separation. How awkward is that?
Family came in 1965 so I was 1 when we emigrated to NYC. The family would have come sooner but there was a ban on specifically Chinese immigration for a long time till LBJ repealed the immigration laws.

2. Public education in Hong Kong was pretty bad and my folks couldn't afford private schools. Jobs opportunitys weren't that great and private homes are insanely expensive.

3. Been what I expected and exceeded it. It took a while for my folks to get their own home, 6 years of scrimping and saving but they got it. Paid $12,000 in 71 and just got offered $280,000 recently.
Too many people expect it to be easy. I have lots of respect for hard working immigrants but none for the slackers who where born here.

4. I have no clue, I was a baby and went back once. My folks miss the part of not being the foreigner everywhere they go outside of NYC.

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:51:34 PM EST
I'm originally from the Philippines. I left to get a better education and a good job in the United States. Living in the U.S. has been more than what I expected. I definitely feel like it's my duty to give back to this country considering what it has given to me and what it enables people to make of themselves. The only thing that I'm not happy about in the U.S. is the fact that it is not as conservative as I would like it to be, and it's getting worse in that aspect. I'm a pretty traditional guy. My wild side only comes out in private.

What I miss most about my country?....................everything, especially the food.

"Any aspects about that culture and people in general that you find superior to that in the U.S.?"

NO culture is more superior than another. To say so would qualify one as being ignorant. Every culture is different and has different standards. Sorry, I didn't mean to sound like a damn liberal.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:59:44 PM EST
I can only guess that my neighbor form Khazakistan came here to torment me with his typical dirt head life style: Build an ugly house, don't plant a lawn for two years, build a 15 foot brick retaining wall in front, park a refridgerator in the front yard, buy two dogs that bark constantly, come out only at night, build a fence on your (his) side of the property line and then ask me to split the cost. Our diversity is our strength
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:09:52 PM EST
I'am originally from Cuba.... Nuff said
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:32:30 PM EST

1. What country were you originally from and how long did you live there?

Canada/Left when I was 18.

2. What were your reasons for leaving?

Better opportunities for everything in the U.S.

3. Has living in the U.S. been what you expected?

Yes.

Anything exceed your expectations?

The relative availability of firearms.

Anything not meet your expectations? Any serious disapointments about our society?

I thought McCarthy had killed all the Communists.

4. What do you miss most about the country you left?

All nude stripbars.

Any aspects about that culture and people in general that you find superior to that in the U.S.?

Not one thing.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:50:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
Dk-Prof admits to being Dutch, and he moved here. Maybe he will tell us why.

It was probably because of all the racket those wooden shoes make.



You sure, I thought he was Swedish.




Bastards, all of you!!

1. I'm originally from DENMARK (not HOLLAND !!!) - but as a kid I lived all over northern Europe - Germany, Denmark and Holland.

2. I decided to go to university in the U.S. instead of Denmark, partly because I thought it would be fun (universities in Denmark are very boring), and partly because I had an American girlfriend who was moving back to the U.S. After finishing my undergrad, I decided to stay for a graduate degree, which eventually turned into a doctorate, and then I ended up staying because most of the good jobs in my field (at good universities) are in the U.S. So I never really PLANNED to live in the U.S. permanently, but circumstances just made it a good choice.

3. I can take or leave the U.S. - it has some absolutely AWESOME aspects to it as a country, but also has some disappointing and depressing aspects to it. Overall, it's different from Denmark, but not better. In some ways, of course, it's far better (which are many of the reasons I am still here), but in other ways it is far worse. (Keep in mind, this is just my personal OPINION - based on my preferences, and also based on having lived lots of different places in the world).

4. It's hard to quantify exactly what it is about the Danish society and culture that I miss. It's sort of the overall "flavour" (or gestalt, if you will) of the place - the attitude of the Danish citizenry that permeates the society we've built. It's a very nice place, and living there is a very different experience than the U.S. It's almost one of those "you'd have to be there" kind of things. I coudl probably explain it in a half-hour conversation, but it's harder to summarize and write in a concise way.

Specifically, I miss the pasties and the candy . No offense, but while there are tons and tons of things that I can list about the U.S. that are awesome, your candy kind of sucks
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:53:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 1:54:24 PM EST by yobo]
1. What country were you originally from and how long did you live there?

R.O.K. Came here with my family when I was 8

2. What were your reasons for leaving?

My grandfather wanted his children to spread out all over the world just in case another war started... wanted the family line to continue. I have families in Australia, England, Germany, Canada, Argentina and USA.

3. Has living in the U.S. been what you expected?

Yes, and more.

Anything exceed your expectations?

Freedom to have black rifles

Anything not meet your expectations?

Yes, American food sucks (except McD)

Still Any serious disapointments about our society?

This country is still too segmented... Chinese-American, German-American, Cuban-American, etc. It should be American-Chinese, American-German, Amercian-Cuban, etc.... American first!
Conform to America or get your ass out!

4. What do you miss most about the country you left?

Having large family gatherings. We had a family reunion couple years age in R.O.K. and had over 2,000 family members attend.

Any aspects about that culture and people in general that you find superior to that in the U.S.?

Not superior/better, just different.

Let me just add that my wife is a Nica.

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:12:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
I know from reading posts here over time that there are a fair amount of people who grew up in foreign lands.

For those who now take up residence here in the states...

1. What country were you originally from and how long did you live there?

I am from New Zealand, I left in 1982 when I was 22.

2. What were your reasons for leaving?

My wife and I left to travel the world, there were many things i wanted to experience. In those days it was expected that every young New Zealander do their "O.E." (Overseas Experience).

3. Has living in the U.S. been what you expected? Anything exceed your expectations? Anything not meet your expectations? Any serious disappointments about our society?

I lived in several other countries before coming to the U.S., I have been here for nearly ten years. I knew a lot about the U.S. before I settled here, I had been here on many occasions for work and vacation over the years so I knew much of what to expect in general.

I have many experiences with which to compare life in the U.S. and it is difficult to know which ones define my attitude toward this country more but your question seems to ask me to compare it to my homeland. The people are not too dissimilar in most ways, N.Z.ers are a little more carefree and have a much greater likelihood of stretching their limits but Americans seem to have a better grasp of the longer term life plans. The thing that disappoints me most is that as a people we allow others to control too much of our lives.


4. What do you miss most about the country you left? Any aspects about that culture and people in general that you find superior to that in the U.S.?

I miss my family, I went back to visit over Christmas, my first time there since 1991 and the first Christmas with my folks since 1981. I miss the availability of the things I like to do - water ski in the morning and snow ski in the afternoon - on the same day...Being a small country most things are close, there is an abundance of things to do and not a lot of effort to get anywhere, no matter where you are you are never more than 80 miles from the sea. I don't think any culture is superior in any way. The way of life anywhere is dictated by your environment and its affect on how you go about your daily business, adapting to your surroundings produces the collective mindset and life goes on. As long as the status quo remains then people will continue to grow.

Thank you for your time.

You're welcome


Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:25:23 PM EST
1) I was from Hong Kong, a British Colony when I left (1981), well, it will have been 23 years ago.

2) Communist China is going to take over Hong Kong, and since my father have served with the Royal Air Force, we do not plan to live in a land that are ruled over by communist. On the other hand, my parients do not like the weather in England either.

3) It have been more that I have expected, I basically grew up in US, and I owe quite a bit to this country. That is the reason why, if it is possible, try to volunteer if possible ( I am a volunteer LEO), my way of saying thanks.

4) I find nothing, and don't miss much...well maybe some culture food, that I cannot have. But you know what, someone once told me, memories are always perfect, and nobody can compete with memories.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:27:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By leungken:

someone once told me, memories are always perfect, and nobody can compete with memories.




Amen!
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