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Posted: 1/21/2008 5:16:12 PM EST
Does anyone use one? Are there better options out there that wont stop writing in the cold?
cmmg
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 4:35:28 AM EST
[#1]
Yes, I just bought the $7.00 Fisher Space-Tec pen.  I bought this one just to try and will go with the Fisher Futura when I get a chance.  I like it.  It goes through the copies on my citation book ok, and writes on almost anything.  It also did not freeze on a car crash recently.

My vote is to get one, but I'm not sure how long the ink lasts.

Bucky145    
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 8:13:14 AM EST
[#2]
I've had a Futura  about 6 months now, great pen. It has always written even in the rain or cold. Refills run about $5 and seem to last about 6 weeks or so.
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 8:16:29 AM EST
[#3]
I'm not an LEO, but I carry a Fisher "Bullet" pen every day.  It's never let me down at at any temperature.  It's a great compact pen.

The most unusual think I've actually used mine for is to mark punctures on inner tubes while the tube is still wet from submerging it to find the hole.
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 11:54:37 AM EST
[#4]
The russians figured out what can write in space without the effect of gravity or the upside issue when a pen wont work............
<­BR>



.....a pencil






.....and saved millions not researching for the perfect pen.




Having said that, It is important to have a writing utensil that works in all condtions.
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 2:22:33 PM EST
[#5]

Quoted:
The russians figured out what can write in space without the effect of gravity or the upside issue when a pen wont work............
<­BR>



.....a pencil






.....and saved millions not researching for the perfect pen.




Having said that, It is important to have a writing utensil that works in all condtions.



I thought that was a urban legend that was discounted.  I could be wrong.  

Bucky145  
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 5:01:21 PM EST
[#6]

Quoted:

Quoted:
The russians figured out what can write in space without the effect of gravity or the upside issue when a pen wont work............
<­BR>



.....a pencil






.....and saved millions not researching for the perfect pen.




Having said that, It is important to have a writing utensil that works in all condtions.



I thought that was a urban legend that was discounted.  I could be wrong.  

Bucky145  


Who cares if its an urban legend, the logic is true.  We keep our rifle log books in pencil.  One time an attorney friend of mine was at the range and saw me writing in my book with a pencil and he asked me why would I keep such an important document in pencil when it was alterable (he knew the value of the log book).  I handed him my book and told him to turn to the January page and look where it said temperature.  When he saw that it was plainly written -22F he said "OH" and handed  it back to me.  Keep a pencil handy, especially for your wheel book.  Keep a warm pen or three near the heat vent in the car for cites.

My $.02 (see below)
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 5:16:07 PM EST
[#7]
I thought I was the only one that figured out putting the pen in the heat vent h.gif
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 5:58:51 PM EST
[#8]
One of the guys I worked with used to call me "space boy" since I always said that there would eventually be many economic and investment oppurtunities in commercial space ventures (private sector) and that it was coming soon.  At the time i had an idea that satelite radio would be big and followed a bunch of sorted companies stocks regarding private satelites being launched for this radio hubbub.  Later all of the original companies were bought out by Sirius and XM.  I did not have money to invest at the time

Anyway...he gave me a space pen for christmas that year and I used it at work all of the time.  Unfortunately, 9 months later some dickheads flew a plane into my office building.  I lost more than the pen.
Link Posted: 1/22/2008 6:10:09 PM EST
[#9]
They are very good pens.  I have used then for years.

"During the first NASA missions the astronauts used pencils. For Project Gemini, for example, NASA ordered mechanical pencils in 1965 from Tycam Engineering Manufacturing, Inc., in Houston. The fixed price contract purchased 34 units at a total cost of $4,382.50, or $128.89 per unit. That created something of a controversy at the time, as many people believed it was a frivolous expense. NASA backtracked immediately and equipped the astronauts with less costly items.

During this time period, Paul C. Fisher of the Fisher Pen Co. designed a ballpoint pen that would operate better in the unique environment of space. His new pen, with a pressurized ink cartridge, functioned in a weightless environment, underwater, in other liquids, and in temperature extremes ranging from -50 F to +400 F.

Fisher developed his space pen with no NASA funding. The company reportedly invested about $1 million of its own funds in the effort then patented its product and cornered the market as a result.

"Fisher offered the pens to NASA in 1965, but, because of the earlier controversy, the agency was hesitant in its approach. In 1967, after rigorous tests, NASA managers agreed to equip the Apollo astronauts with these pens. Media reports indicate that approximately 400 pens were purchased from Fisher at $6 per unit for Project Apollo.

The Soviet Union also purchased 100 of the Fisher pens, and 1,000 ink cartridges, in February 1969, for use on its Soyuz space flights. Previously, its cosmonauts had been using grease pencils to write in orbit.

Both American astronauts and Soviet/Russian cosmonauts have continued to use these pens.

Fisher continues to market his space pens as the writing instrument that went to the Moon and has spun off this effort into a separate corporation, the Fisher Space Pen Co."
Link Posted: 1/23/2008 3:09:07 PM EST
[#10]

Quoted:
They are very good pens.  I have used then for years.

"During the first NASA missions the astronauts used pencils. For Project Gemini, for example, NASA ordered mechanical pencils in 1965 from Tycam Engineering Manufacturing, Inc., in Houston. The fixed price contract purchased 34 units at a total cost of $4,382.50, or $128.89 per unit. That created something of a controversy at the time, as many people believed it was a frivolous expense. NASA backtracked immediately and equipped the astronauts with less costly items.

During this time period, Paul C. Fisher of the Fisher Pen Co. designed a ballpoint pen that would operate better in the unique environment of space. His new pen, with a pressurized ink cartridge, functioned in a weightless environment, underwater, in other liquids, and in temperature extremes ranging from -50 F to +400 F.

Fisher developed his space pen with no NASA funding. The company reportedly invested about $1 million of its own funds in the effort then patented its product and cornered the market as a result.

"Fisher offered the pens to NASA in 1965, but, because of the earlier controversy, the agency was hesitant in its approach. In 1967, after rigorous tests, NASA managers agreed to equip the Apollo astronauts with these pens. Media reports indicate that approximately 400 pens were purchased from Fisher at $6 per unit for Project Apollo.

The Soviet Union also purchased 100 of the Fisher pens, and 1,000 ink cartridges, in February 1969, for use on its Soyuz space flights. Previously, its cosmonauts had been using grease pencils to write in orbit.

Both American astronauts and Soviet/Russian cosmonauts have continued to use these pens.

Fisher continues to market his space pens as the writing instrument that went to the Moon and has spun off this effort into a separate corporation, the Fisher Space Pen Co."



thank you for correcting me.   <---Me
Link Posted: 1/23/2008 4:38:04 PM EST
[#11]

Quoted:
The russians figured out what can write in space without the effect of gravity or the upside issue when a pen wont work............



Of course others have already pointed out this common urban legend.

In addition, the use of pencils on board spacecraft is a horrible idea.  Broken fragments of lead (conductive graphite in clay) can end up in electrical components, jamming switches, or otherwise causing problems.


I made a carrier for my Fisher Bullet pen so that it fits neatly on my front pocket wallet.  I don't use it *often*, but it is always available when I need it.
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