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Posted: 1/28/2014 6:11:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 6:12:20 AM EDT by VBC]
For somebody who is mainly going to point and click without going much into the user adjustments, would I be best served by an entry level DSLR (like a Nikon D3100 on clearance price) or get one of the compact point and click type cameras for equivalent price?

I want good pictures from a camera I wouldn't mind carrying around in a backpack or stowed away for occasional pictures when I'm out hunting and fishing and the like.



Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:12:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 6:12:53 AM EDT by Choking_Hazard]
If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:15:00 AM EDT
I started taking pictures with a Canon Rebel XT

More of a camera that I needed but learned a lot on the way



Im nowhere close to a good picture taker.

If youre half way serious about shooting pictures, get a "decent" camera.



Have fun with it
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:15:27 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.
View Quote



Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:15:35 AM EDT
what are you photographing? If its fast moving, or the light is iffy, or its far away I'd suggest the SLR. If its just portrait, panoramic stuff in reasonable light P&S (or just use your camera phone).
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:17:08 AM EDT
I've found that many of the higher end point and shoot (normally the ones with the better optical zoom features) cameras allow you to manually fiddle with the settings to some extent (ISO, F-values, etc.) so you can shoot how you like, depending on your mood.  If you get one of those and you find out you really want to get into DSLR, then you can make the jump up and still have a very decent point and shoot for when it's more convenient.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:17:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 6:19:21 AM EDT by Choking_Hazard]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By VBC:
Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?
View Quote


Honest answer... depends.  A DSLR will give you access to a larger range of lenses, but a point and shoot will have some "auto modes" that make certain common types of photos easier to take.  The DSLR will ONLY have an auto mode, whereas a point and shoot will have underwater, night, "sports", etc.

ETA

I have a Canon T1i DSLR and a Canon PowerShot SD780 point and shoot btw.  I love my DSLR but I carry my PowerShot daily.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:19:40 AM EDT
Look at how long it takes between pictures. One of the things that annoyed me about point and shoots was the 4 seconds you had to wait until you could take another shot.  DSLR, not the case.   Current models may be better though.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:20:44 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By VBC:



Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?
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Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.



Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


No, provided you know how to use the DSLR to it's full potential.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:30:21 AM EDT
I have a D3100.  It's a great beginning camera.
I've had it now for three years.  I take it everywhere I go.

D3100's are still in the pipeline if you decide to get one.  
There are some smoking deals on refurbished D3100's at places like Adorama.

From my wallpaper collection


Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:36:16 AM EDT
Buying an entry-level DSLR (Canon Rebel XS) was the best thing I've done photography-wise. It's so far superior to any of the point-n-click cameras I had before it's not even funny.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:37:24 AM EDT
The camera you use is the camera you carry. DSLRs have amazing features, and you can do a lot with them, but they are bulky and sometimes hard to carry around all the time. Plus you have to buy expensive lenses because the ones that come with the camera body are usually crap. If you want to take advantage of their features, there is no substitute, however, if you just want the DSLR as a "nicer point and shoot", you will probably end up leaving it at home more often than not. There are some really good point and shoot options out there (check out sites like dpreview.com), and having a small quality camera in your pocket more than makes up for the high end thing that sits on the shelf. There are also some really good point and shoot photographers out there (check out photo.net and look at some of Phillip Greenspun's photos and comments about point and shoot cameras).

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:40:12 AM EDT
Take a look at a Panasonic LX7

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:41:30 AM EDT
Ive got a D40 and it has been kick ass. For what we do with it, it is a whole lot of Camera.

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:43:11 AM EDT
Look at the "Bridge" cameras like the Nikon CoolPix P510.  Great cameras that offer more than a point and shoot but are still simpler than a DSLR.



Took this pic with mine:




Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:48:29 AM EDT
A DSLR is a lot of fun. But it gets to be a decent load to carry around, if you have an extra lens or two, some battery packs, etc.

A quality P&S will take pretty good pictures these days. And you still get a lot of the options you get on a DSLR, just not as easy to access. Other than changing lenses, of course.

A mirrorless combines the best of both worlds, but costs. I'm flipping a coin between a decent mirrorless or another DSLR for the next camera.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:49:00 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.
View Quote

Yep, and especially with a DSLR don't neglect the used market. Buy a couple generations back and you can get great equipment very cheap. I got my Canon 40D(used to be a $1000 camera) with well under 10,000 photos taken on it for under $250 shipped. People want the latest hot thing, almost worse than guns, and dump last year's gear for next year's. People like me who want a good camera on a budget but don't need built in Wi-Fi like the Canon 70D has get some great deals on barely used stuff.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:49:20 AM EDT
I vote full size camera.   I love the flexibility the full size cameras offer with the different lens available.  

I had a Pentax K100D and upgraded to the K-30.    The Pentax stuff doesn't offer as much for lens choice as the Nikon or the Canon brands, but enough for the amatuer photographer.

Plus, the Pentax cameras have the shake reduction built into the body, which I really like.

Have fun with it whatever you choose.......photography is a great hobby.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:51:22 AM EDT
A DSLR will out perform a point and shoot, even in auto mode.  Go for a DSLR, or a micro 4/3.  
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:51:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 6:52:52 AM EDT by shack357]
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Originally Posted By ZekeMenuar:
I have a D3100.  It's a great beginning camera.
I've had it now for three years.  I take it everywhere I go.

D3100's are still in the pipeline if you decide to get one.  
There are some smoking deals on refurbished D3100's at places like Adorama.

From my wallpaper collection
http://i42.tinypic.com/2rdkxt1.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/vghs8l.jpg
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Nice shot, very similar to the heron I got last spring. Canon 40D and Sigma 50-500MM.
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Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:53:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 6:53:52 AM EDT by tcrpe]
"Good photos" are more about the lighting and composition than the camera.  Get the compact, and leave the instruction manual on the toilet tank.  And read it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:54:54 AM EDT


Assuming you can't get both, it sounds like you'd be better off with a high-quality P&S.



Lugging a DSLR around in a backpack or when hunting will get old really fast.



And being as you want to take it hunting and fishing, look into one of the waterproof/shockproof cameras.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:55:46 AM EDT
i took this with a canon t3i which can be had for super cheap.

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:56:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VBC:
For somebody who is mainly going to point and click without going much into the user adjustments, would I be best served by an entry level DSLR (like a Nikon D3100 on clearance price) or get one of the compact point and click type cameras for equivalent price?

I want good pictures from a camera I wouldn't mind carrying around in a backpack or stowed away for occasional pictures when I'm out hunting and fishing and the like.



View Quote

Get it.  Especially if it has the upgraded lens that comes with it from.  I ordered it from Amazon for my wife for Christmas on a recommendation from a friend who does a lot of photography.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:57:03 AM EDT
Spend 8 hours learning the functions on the DSLR, and shoot in manual mode. Your end product will be much better.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:03:14 AM EDT
A couple of P&S options to check out:

Traditional P&S:
Sony CyberShot 100-DSC-RX100

Mirror less cameras ($700-1000) range:

Mid range mirrorless camera roundup

Entry level mirrorless ($250-600) range:

Entry level mirrorless roundup





Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:04:23 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By VBC:





Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?
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Originally Posted By VBC:



Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:

If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.


Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


If you spend the money for a DSLR and shoot in auto, you've wasted said money.



 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:04:28 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By JAMES77257:
Spend 8 hours learning the functions on the DSLR, and shoot in manual mode. Your end product will be much better.
View Quote


I shoot 99.9% of the time in Av what I care about most is controlling the depth of field.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:05:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By devilskwerl:

Assuming you can't get both, it sounds like you'd be better off with a high-quality P&S.

Lugging a DSLR around in a backpack or when hunting will get old really fast.

And being as you want to take it hunting and fishing, look into one of the waterproof/shockproof cameras.



View Quote


Get both.  [mindblown.gif]  That's something I hadn't even considered yet.  

Thanks for the suggestions / comments and great example pics everyone.  I think I have a better idea how I want to proceed now.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:06:00 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By RTUtah:





If you spend the money for a DSLR and shoot in auto, you've wasted said money.

 
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Originally Posted By RTUtah:



Originally Posted By VBC:


Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:

If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.


Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


If you spend the money for a DSLR and shoot in auto, you've wasted said money.

 




 
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:07:28 AM EDT
I highly doubt you'll want to lug around hunting/fishing gear on top of camera lens and gear for general use. You can take good photos and bad ones with both.

I'm going with a 3rd option; Camera phone. Point, click, upload to facebook/text/arfcom/etc.





Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:07:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:08:35 AM EDT by Choking_Hazard]
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Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.
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I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:08:30 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By JAMES77257:
Spend 8 hours learning the functions on the DSLR, and shoot in manual mode. Your end product will be much better.
View Quote


Manual mode is all I ever use now.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:09:27 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By MVolkJ:


Manual mode is all I ever use now.
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Originally Posted By MVolkJ:
Originally Posted By JAMES77257:
Spend 8 hours learning the functions on the DSLR, and shoot in manual mode. Your end product will be much better.


Manual mode is all I ever use now.


I like Av or Tv unless I'm shooting something specific like a long exposure.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:10:50 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


Honest answer... depends.  A DSLR will give you access to a larger range of lenses, but a point and shoot will have some "auto modes" that make certain common types of photos easier to take.  The DSLR will ONLY have an auto mode, whereas a point and shoot will have underwater, night, "sports", etc.

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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By VBC:
Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


Honest answer... depends.  A DSLR will give you access to a larger range of lenses, but a point and shoot will have some "auto modes" that make certain common types of photos easier to take.  The DSLR will ONLY have an auto mode, whereas a point and shoot will have underwater, night, "sports", etc.



I have a Nikon DSLR with Several auto modes; Night, sports, portrait, close up, ect.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:11:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:12:46 AM EDT by fla556guy]
Point and shoot?  Use your phone.

Like photography for the great pix you take, not just to remember?  DSLR.....I have 50d (or d50, ibforget).
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:12:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:14:07 AM EDT by Choking_Hazard]
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Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
I have a Nikon DSLR with Several auto modes; Night, sports, portrait, close up, ect.
View Quote


Actually you're right.  I just checked my camera and I stand corrected.  I've just never used them and forgot they're there

ETA

I suppose the only considerations now are weight, bulk, and a slightly more complicated camera.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:14:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.


I think pretty much all entry DSLRs have "sports" settings too. That's not really learning your camera or taking full advantage either. Setting the camera to a little running man or a candle when it's dark is not the same as understanding what settings are being changed and why IMO.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:14:49 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By nashgill:





 
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.
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Originally Posted By nashgill:



Originally Posted By RTUtah:


Originally Posted By VBC:


Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:

If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.


Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


If you spend the money for a DSLR and shoot in auto, you've wasted said money.

 


 
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


Sure the photo quality is better than a P&S but you purchase a DSLR for the manual adjustments.  Point being if you're not willing to learn how to maximize a DSLR's advantages, you're better off buying a high-pixel'd P&S.



 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:15:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:17:13 AM EDT by MVolkJ]
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


Actually you're right.  I just checked my camera and I stand corrected.  I've just never used them and forgot they're there

ETA

I suppose the only considerations now are weight, bulk, and a slightly more complicated camera.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
I have a Nikon DSLR with Several auto modes; Night, sports, portrait, close up, ect.


Actually you're right.  I just checked my camera and I stand corrected.  I've just never used them and forgot they're there

ETA

I suppose the only considerations now are weight, bulk, and a slightly more complicated camera.


Yep. My Canon has them too, but I never use them.

The weight/size is the big issue, honestly. DSLRs aren't hard to figure out, but they are bulky and a hassle to carry around with you as compared to a little pocket camera (or a phone with a camera, for that matter).
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:16:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:21:25 AM EDT by CRSSBNS]
I recently picked up a Canon EOS 60D w/18-135mm lens kit, upgraded from the inexpensive Sony & Nikon point and shoot type cameras - HUGE difference IMO. I agree with those saying that it takes time to get the hang of DSLR type cameras, but its totally worth it. Plus, once you pick a certain type of camera/sensor size, the lenses are generally interchangeable between models, so you can start with an entry level DSLR, and upgrade the body later while still being albe to use your lens collection. One thing to be aware of - Nikon D3xxx & D5xxx series DSLRs have a different auto focusing motor setup than the D7xxx series of cameras (they require the AF motor to be built into the lens, as opposed to the camera body). In my honest opinion, I think its smarter to spring for the higher end camera from the beginning, and have a more adaptable unit that has a significantly longer practical lifespan. Some of the older high-mid level cameras like the D7000 & 60D are on sale right now - I tried to find a D7000, but they were sold out so I got the Canon equivalent - EOS 60D. Ended up working out better for me anyways, because the Canon has an articulating LCD screen that makes it easier to shoot photos and videos from odd/awkward angles - which is a big benefit for me. I knew that I would be getting into photography as a serious hobby, so I figured it was worth it to start off with a higher end unit, than to buy an entry level unit that I'll end up upgrading in a few years anyways and probably spend more money over the long run doing so. Plus, the D7000 & 60D are more weather resistant that most models underneath them - most people I know who are into photography consider these two models to be entry-level cameras for professional work.

Just my 2 cents.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:16:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:17:20 AM EDT by AZ_Sky]
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.


Not sure I'm following you.
My Nikon DSLR (I have a D80 and a D90) both have the six standard scene auto presets as well as the D3100.
That said, I usually shoot my DSLR's in either aperture or shutter priority.
Other than being bulkier to carry around, I far and away prefer my DSLR's over my point and shoot cameras.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:16:27 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.


Many DSLR's have "sports" mode with faster shutter speeds.  I took this on Sports with a Nikon D50 and an 18-135 Nikon lens

Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:17:39 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


Honest answer... depends.  A DSLR will give you access to a larger range of lenses, but a point and shoot will have some "auto modes" that make certain common types of photos easier to take.  The DSLR will ONLY have an auto mode, whereas a point and shoot will have underwater, night, "sports", etc.

ETA

I have a Canon T1i DSLR and a Canon PowerShot SD780 point and shoot btw.  I love my DSLR but I carry my PowerShot daily.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By VBC:
Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


Honest answer... depends.  A DSLR will give you access to a larger range of lenses, but a point and shoot will have some "auto modes" that make certain common types of photos easier to take.  The DSLR will ONLY have an auto mode, whereas a point and shoot will have underwater, night, "sports", etc.

ETA

I have a Canon T1i DSLR and a Canon PowerShot SD780 point and shoot btw.  I love my DSLR but I carry my PowerShot daily.


Not entirely true.  I have a Nikon D5100 and it has the usual A/S/M/P modes, plus presets for sports/low light/portrait/outdoors/etc.  It even has built in filters and lighting presets.  Then again, that was a $900 setup.  I'm so happy I got it at $450
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:18:10 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Not sure I'm following you.
My Nikon DSLR (I have a D80 and a D90) both have the six standard scene auto presets as well as the D3100.
Other than being bulkier to carry around, I far and away prefer my DSLR's over my point and shoot cameras.
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I corrected myself.  Look a few posts up.  I gave up the presets when I moved from a P&S to a DSLR and that's been so many years ago I forgot they were there.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:19:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 7:19:52 AM EDT by iroc409]
I took a lot of nice pictures with my D40, but my D80 is a far better camera (for many reasons).

Check out the Canon G1X/G15.  They are supposed to be one of the best point-and-shoot cameras, and a lot of professionals use them for an "all-purpose" when they don't want to carry a DSLR.  I would really like to get one to keep in the bag for trips and stuff, because sometimes it's nice having a smaller camera to drag around on foot.

http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/cameras/powershot-g-s-series-digital-cameras
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:19:39 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By txinvestigator:


Many DSLR's have "sports" mode with faster shutter speeds.  I took this on Sports with a Nikon D50 and an 18-135 Nikon lens

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/txinvestigator/Air%20Show%202010/DSC_0337.jpg
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Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.


Many DSLR's have "sports" mode with faster shutter speeds.  I took this on Sports with a Nikon D50 and an 18-135 Nikon lens

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/txinvestigator/Air%20Show%202010/DSC_0337.jpg


I would say your shutter speed was too fast. Look at the propellers. It looks like that thing should fall right out of the sky.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:23:34 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By c7aea15:


I would say your shutter speed was too fast. Look at the propellers. It looks like that thing should fall right out of the sky.
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Originally Posted By c7aea15:
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By nashgill:
I disagree.  You still have a much larger sensor with much more light.  Pics in auto mode are still better than a P&S.  Money certainly isn't wasted.  You may not be getting all that a DSLR can do, but it's still more than a P&S.


I disagree.  If he doesn't want to learn the ins and outs of a DSLR then the various auto modes offered with a P&S would give him a better picture than the "green box" auto on a DSLR.  Take sports for example.  Setting the P&S to "sports" is going to give him the fast shutter speed he needs, while the standard auto on a DSLR would not.


Many DSLR's have "sports" mode with faster shutter speeds.  I took this on Sports with a Nikon D50 and an 18-135 Nikon lens

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v484/txinvestigator/Air%20Show%202010/DSC_0337.jpg


I would say your shutter speed was too fast. Look at the propellers. It looks like that thing should fall right out of the sky.


I know.  It was set to "Sports" in auto mode.  That was my first venture out with the camera so I set it.    Today I would manually control the shutter speed, but it's kinda cool though, right?



Another thing I prefer is the immediate shutter release with a DSLR as opposed to the P&S cameras.  That used to frustrate the crap out of me, that delay of the shutter.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:25:50 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
I know.  It was set to "Sports" in auto mode.  That was my first venture out with the camera so I set it.    Today I would manually control the shutter speed, but it's kinda cool though, right?



Another thing I prefer is the immediate shutter release with a DSLR as opposed to the P&S cameras.  That used to frustrate the crap out of me, that delay of the shutter.
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That might vary between P&S models.  I know my P&S has the same button setup as my DSLR.  Half press auto focuses and then pressing it the rest of the way snaps the shot.  You only get the delay if you press the button all the way down from the start.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:27:34 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By VBC:



Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?
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Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
If you want to spend the time to learn how to use it a DSLR is a great camera.  If you only want to put in a battery and take a few snapshots then get the point and shoot.



Would you say the point and shoots produce the same picture quality as a DSLR in auto-mode?


maybe.

if you just use the kit lens, then probably.

if you use good glass, then not even close.

the DSLR's also tend to have better image sensors than point and shoot.
don't let the megapixel count confuse you too much. the smaller the sensor, like on the point and shoots, the more likeliness of noise in the pictures.

but if you just want to take pictures, and aren't going to spend the time to learn to use the camera, then the point and shoot is the better option.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 7:31:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:


That might vary between P&S models.  I know my P&S has the same button setup as my DSLR.  Half press auto focuses and then pressing it the rest of the way snaps the shot.  You only get the delay if you press the button all the way down from the start.
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Originally Posted By Choking_Hazard:
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
I know.  It was set to "Sports" in auto mode.  That was my first venture out with the camera so I set it.    Today I would manually control the shutter speed, but it's kinda cool though, right?



Another thing I prefer is the immediate shutter release with a DSLR as opposed to the P&S cameras.  That used to frustrate the crap out of me, that delay of the shutter.


That might vary between P&S models.  I know my P&S has the same button setup as my DSLR.  Half press auto focuses and then pressing it the rest of the way snaps the shot.  You only get the delay if you press the button all the way down from the start.



Yeah, but take the airshow for example, lots of movement towards and away from the camera.  I put the camera on manual focus and and then the shutter tripped when I pressed the release with the camera having to try to keep up.  



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