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Posted: 12/21/2003 1:37:31 PM EDT
Curious if anyone here owns a Vizsla. Pretty much everything I've found about them paints them as extremely loving, intelligent and active. I've also read that they although they are intelligent, they can be a little stubborn. Does anyone have any experience with them? I have a Golden right now that I love to death. Would I be fooling myself to expect the same level of intelligence from the Vizsla? Any downsides to the breed?
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 3:54:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2003 3:58:58 AM EDT by sloth]
My wife and I's first child is a vizsla.  Rusty is now 3 1/2 years old.  He still acts like a puppy.  Everything that you've mentioned about hungarian pointer is pretty much right on.  

They are known as the velcro dogs.  He will follow you where ever you go.  Sit by the shower, follow you into the bathroom when you go or hop up onto the couch when you watch TV.  Its actually tough to get away from him.  He sleeps on our bed with us (we screwed up by letting him do it when he was small).  He can be stuborn at times, but not as much so as other pointers (weimers and short hairs).  I think the fact that they are intelligent means that you have to really stay on top of them.  I wouldn't chacterize Rusty as a stuborn dog though.

The only downside is that they are almost too dependent.  If they do not get enough exercise they can and will get somewhat distructive.  They are pointers and as such ment to have enough energy to hunt all day long.  They are much more easy going when they can go out and run for a little bit.

Not a good dog if you don't have a way to either exercise them daily or a really big yard to let them run themselves tierd.  Also, due to their clingy nature, they would do better in a home where someone is home a good portion of the day.  Although my wife and I both worked for the first few years of Rusty's life...you could tell he'd get really down and depressed when we'd put him away during the day.  

All in all, I'd highly recommend one.  They have a lot of affection and are IMHO the most attractive dog there is.  He has tons of love and will never leave your side.  Good luck.  If you get one, PLEASE post pics.  Vizsla puppies are absolutely adorable.  

Jim
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 5:05:55 AM EDT
[url]http://clubs.akc.org/vizsla/rescue.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:24:02 AM EDT
Superb hunting dogs.  Pheasant, quail, dove, squirrel (would tree them and circle so I could get a shot), etc...

One of the best teams we had was our vizsla and a brittany.  Ours hunted close and my grandpa's brittany would do the long range work.  There have been vizslas somewhere in our family for nearly the past 30 yrs.  Ours was pretty independant and would roam our 20 acres and would always come when called.  She was an outdoor dog (but stayed in our heated shop).

Very smart dog and extremely loyal and loving.  You can't go wrong with this breed, but males are typically more high strung than the females IMHO.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:30:04 AM EDT
... Dang, I hadn't heard of them. I'm somewhat considering a puppy.

... Nice looking doggie

[img]http://www.puppydogweb.com/caninebreeds/dogimages/vizsla_pdw.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 7:21:57 AM EDT
Man...that looks just like Rusty.  I want to leave work and go home to see him.  I'm a big sucker when he's involved.  As for hunting, he has great instincts despite the fact I've never taught him anything.  The only think he has trouble with is holding after a bird flushes (he still thinks he can catch it if he runs fast enough).  Our doesn't range very far.  When I take him out he'll go as far as 40-50 yards away and then sort of work around.

I really don't think you can go wrong with this breed (as long as you don't mind the exercise they will need and you have room for them to run).  I second the female thing.  Rusty is not fixed and he has far too much energy.  I wouldn't say he's high strung, but he does have a lot of energy.  
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 7:28:40 AM EDT
My fathe rin law just got one. He is retired and an avid bird hunter.
This man takes his hunting seriously and did ALOT of research before choosing a Vizla as his hunting companion.
He drove and flew to a few different breeders before finally deciding on a litter he found way out in the boonies in Canada.
I thought he was crazy at first, before I realized what this puppy is capable of. They need alot of love and attention and my father in law provides this dog with an excess of everything.
The dog is a natural pointer and retreiver. He follows my father in law everywhere and points out every critter my father in-law has "sensed" him to.
The animal is extremely intelligent, and looks like he will be a great hunting companion when he is old enough.
If you are looking for a great bird dog the Vizla should be on your list as one of the top contenders.
Good luck.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 7:44:48 AM EDT
As with all breeds that will be asked to actually DO something rather than simply LOOK good, a Vizsla for hunting use should come from a working dog breeder...like wisper300's father-in-law obviously chose. Stay away from the AKC show dog breeders unless you just want a pet. Oh, yeah, they will tell you thet their dogs will hunt, blah, blah, blah...probably not, but most certainly not nearly as well as one bred for performance for 20-50 generations!
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 3:23:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ikor:
As with all breeds that will be asked to actually DO something rather than simply LOOK good, a Vizsla for hunting use should come from a working dog breeder...like wisper300's father-in-law obviously chose. Stay away from the AKC show dog breeders unless you just want a pet. Oh, yeah, they will tell you thet their dogs will hunt, blah, blah, blah...probably not, but most certainly not nearly as well as one bred for performance for 20-50 generations!
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I agree with IKOR.  I work with a fella that hunts wih a couple vizslas (far more intense with it than I).  He's told me the same thing.  The best dogs aren't AKC show queens or even field trial champions.  You want a dog that comes from serious hunting lines.  Dogs that go out a work day in and day out.  Its the same with livestock...the big dollar cattle that win shows aren't always the best stock for feedlot productivity.  You'll also save a lot of money avoiding dogs with all the ribbons and awards.  

One thing you need to look for is bloodlines that have an OFA number.  Basically this is an hip x-ray that is scored.  It will show if the parents are predisposed to hip dysplasia (a terrible condition in a dog that runs as much as a retriever).

Link Posted: 12/22/2003 3:33:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:17:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2003 4:26:54 PM EDT by jake1978]
Thanks for the replies fellas. He wouldn't be a hunting dog or a show dog or anything...just a regular dog that plays during the day and sleeps inside at night. I have an average sized back yard and another dog for him to run around with, and we get out to the dogpark once a week or so and to the lake when the weather permits. I keep hearing that they will become destructive if not exercised enough. I'm not concerned with a chewed up shoe or two as a pup, but can I expect problems if he's just allowed to be a regular dog and I can't take him for a run every day?
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:46:32 PM EDT
I'm not a hunter but I have owned a V.

They are very high strung and do not like to be left alone.  Mine would range out about 40-50 yds when we walked offleash, go out ahead and circle back.  Even when my other dog ran out of sight, the V wouldn't let me out of his sight.  He also pointed naturally and he didn't care for the water.  They have a very thin coat so I don't know that you would want to hunt with them in the dead of winter.  Mine would play around in the snow then start to shiver when he slowed down to catch his breath.  He was a beautiful and smart dog but a real handful at times.

Be forewarned, male Vs will test your dominance and they can be aggressive.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:50:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:55:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
Originally Posted By jake1978:
but can I expect problems if he's just allowed to be a regular dog and I can't take him for a run every day?
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Perhaps.  It would be best if you leave the hunting breeds to hunters, lest you end up dumping him at the pound because he is "too high strung."  Get a nice Shitzoo or Pomeranian or other fluffy little turd machine that is worthless for anything except being a "pet."  Due to their small size, they eat less too.    
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I would agree with this.  Don't get one if you expect him to be a 'regular dog'  I was already used to having to run my other dog for an hour or two everyday and I was not prepared for the energy of the V.

Link Posted: 12/22/2003 5:27:36 PM EDT
It would be best if you leave the hunting breeds to hunter lest you end up dumping him at the pound because he is "too high strung."
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Pass on the little turd machines. And as far as dumping a dog at the pound, that'll never happen, but I am, however, aware of the many other options, such as rescue groups and whatnot.

Get a nice Shitzoo or Pomeranian or other fluffy little turd machine that is worthless for anything except being a "pet."  Due to their small size, they eat less too.    
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If I'm reading you correctly, should I only be allowed to have certain types of dogs as "pets"? The only thing my retriever ever retrieves is his Kong, and though I can't speak dog, I'm quite sure he is content with his life as a "pet". In fact, I would be surprised if you could name a handful of dogs, other than the little floofy ones that you spoke of that were originally bred to be "pets", yet they have all found their way into backyards across the world as nothing more than "pets" and regular dogs. Not having enough time to exercise him is one issue, but telling me I shouldn't get a hunting dog because I don't hunt is ridiculous. Sorry to gripe, but your post kinda rubbed me as a little pretentious.

Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:00:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:13:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2003 6:16:45 PM EDT by motopix]
Jake, BK was a little abrasive in his response but being a non-hunter and a former V owner as I've already said, he is right on.

From my understanding, the energy and dominance issues that make a great hunting dog make it NOT a good housepet for the non-hunter.

Do not get a V. You and it will not be happy.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 6:44:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
Pardon, I would not deign (though you DID ask) to tell you what to get....
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Not to mince words, but I didn't ask what to get, but rather about information for a specific breed. But never-the-less...apology accepted, and I appreciate your input.

Moto-
The places I've read besides here indicate that they are, in fact, excellent house dogs, if you have the energy to keep up with them and the understanding that they will be in your face most of the time. Again, though, I definitely appreciate your advice. Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 7:14:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2003 7:22:19 PM EDT by Corey]
Be prepared for a high strung and high needs dog.  The Vizsla I know is a wonderful dog and I'd take her in in a heartbeat.

But they are a world apart from a Golden.  In my experience Goldens and labs tend to pass puppyhood quicky and settle down into relatively calm dogs.  (I know generalizations are not always accurate.)

Trust me when I say that I know what a high energy, highly intelligent, high activity dog is all about.  We have two Airedales.  We love them both and they're excellent family dogs if (and that's a big IF) you have the commitment to meeting their needs and dealing with a high energy dog.

It's no coincidence that you see Airedale, Vizsla, Greyhound, Dalmation etc. rescues.  Our breeder weeds out inappropriate owners.  I wish more breeders would follow that lead....

EDITED to add that you also asked about intelligence.  Well, sometimes a dog can think that he or she is smarter than you are.  Which means a stubborn dog.  Not all high energy dogs are intelligent.  I know Airedales are and believe that Vizslas are as well.  High energy + smart can = a handful.  (Though I think Vizslas strong hunt breeding may instill in them a fair natural tendancy to please their owners.)  I'm not saying "be warned," but be ready.  Because a dog like this will mean a lifestyle adjustment over the dog that sleeps all day.
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