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Posted: 12/30/2015 8:54:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 9:04:43 PM EDT by Veracity]
Guys,

Too much to type, but I believe there's evidence that they did reach the summit in June 1924.

**One eye witness account from base camp,ma guy named Odell, has the climbers moving at a brisk pace at roughly noon time on the "Second Step". If accurate, this account would put them at a good pace to summit by roughly 5:30pm. Some have disputed the accuracy of this account.

**Notes recovered off of Mallory's body indicate that they had three O2 bottles each when they set out that morning.

**Mallory's goggles were found stowed inside his jacket....indicating that they died after the sun set...most likely on their way back down.

**The picture of Mallory's wife (which he carried solely for the purpose of placing it at the summit) was not in his pockets.

During a Chinese expedition in 1975, a climber reported seeing a body that, due to the description of the clothing, is widely believed to be Mallory's climbing partner, Sandy Irvine. Irvine was carrying a Kodak camera. Kodak engineers say that the film may still be good.

If his body is ever recovered and that film is successfully developed, we may finally know.

Thoughts?

Link Posted: 12/30/2015 8:57:07 PM EDT
Thoughts?

Too deep for GD.


And I say that as one who marvels at Everest.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 8:58:54 PM EDT
It's very possible that he did make it, however surviving it was a bigger challenge than just summiting, so sir Edmund still gets the credit for the complete job
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:00:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 11:41:46 PM EDT by MonkeyGrip]
No.  Would not have made the "third step"  "Second Step"

In 1960, a Chinese expedition made the first verified climb of the Second Step, a 30-meter wall requiring real technical climbing skills, and four of the five who tried failed to climb it. They succeeded only by the climbing technique called courte-échelle, where men literally climb on top of each other like a circus act. Mallory was a very good climber, but Irvine was not. It's possible they could have done the same thing; but with only two of them, getting back down would have been a lot trickier.

View Quote





Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:01:02 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Surfdiver:
It's very possible that he did make it, however surviving it was a bigger challenge than just summiting, so sir Edmund still gets the credit for the complete job
View Quote


This. I do think they made it, just not the back down part.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:03:30 PM EDT
I think they made it.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:05:08 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Surfdiver:
It's very possible that he did make it, however surviving it was a bigger challenge than just summiting, so sir Edmund still gets the credit for the complete job
View Quote


Yes.

My thoughts too
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:06:42 PM EDT
Summit?  Yes.

"Make it"?  Uh, not quite.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:07:00 PM EDT
I think it's entirely possible they summited.

Who knows? That missing camera might turn up any day, with the photographic proof.

Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:13:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 9:14:53 PM EDT by Veracity]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
No.  Would not have made the "third step"


http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


https://skeptoid.com/images/everest.jpg
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Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
No.  Would not have made the "third step"

In 1960, a Chinese expedition made the first verified climb of the Second Step, a 30-meter wall requiring real technical climbing skills, and four of the five who tried failed to climb it. They succeeded only by the climbing technique called courte-échelle, where men literally climb on top of each other like a circus act. Mallory was a very good climber, but Irvine was not. It's possible they could have done the same thing; but with only two of them, getting back down would have been a lot trickier.



http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


https://skeptoid.com/images/everest.jpg

Nice pics
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:19:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Veracity:
Guys,

Too much to type, but I believe there's evidence that they did reach the summit in June 1924.

**One eye witness account from base camp,ma guy named Odell, has the climbers moving at a brisk pace at roughly noon time on the "Second Step". If accurate, this account would put them at a good pace to summit by roughly 5:30pm. Some have disputed the accuracy of this account.

**Notes recovered off of Mallory's body indicate that they had three O2 bottles each when they set out that morning.

**Mallory's goggles were found stowed inside his jacket....indicating that they died after the sun set...most likely on their way back down.

**The picture of Mallory's wife (which he carried solely for the purpose of placing it at the summit) was not in his pockets.

During a Chinese expedition in 1975, a climber reported seeing a body that, due to the description of the clothing, is widely believed to be Mallory's climbing partner, Sandy Irvine. Irvine was carrying a Kodak camera. Kodak engineers say that the film may still be good.

If his body is ever recovered and that film is successfully developed, we may finally know.

Thoughts?

View Quote



Irrelevant if you don't make it back down.

I do not think they made it to top either.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:25:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LE6920:



Irrelevant if you don't make it back down.

I do not think they made it to top either.
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Originally Posted By LE6920:
Originally Posted By Veracity:
Guys,

Too much to type, but I believe there's evidence that they did reach the summit in June 1924.

**One eye witness account from base camp,ma guy named Odell, has the climbers moving at a brisk pace at roughly noon time on the "Second Step". If accurate, this account would put them at a good pace to summit by roughly 5:30pm. Some have disputed the accuracy of this account.

**Notes recovered off of Mallory's body indicate that they had three O2 bottles each when they set out that morning.

**Mallory's goggles were found stowed inside his jacket....indicating that they died after the sun set...most likely on their way back down.

**The picture of Mallory's wife (which he carried solely for the purpose of placing it at the summit) was not in his pockets.

During a Chinese expedition in 1975, a climber reported seeing a body that, due to the description of the clothing, is widely believed to be Mallory's climbing partner, Sandy Irvine. Irvine was carrying a Kodak camera. Kodak engineers say that the film may still be good.

If his body is ever recovered and that film is successfully developed, we may finally know.

Thoughts?




Irrelevant if you don't make it back down.

I do not think they made it to top either.



Irrelevant?

That seems a bit harsh.

Living to tell the tale is the most important thing.....however, I still want those guys to get the recognition if proof should ever emerge someday.

It would just mean adding an asterisk to the record book. First summit vs first summit and lived to have a beer at base camp.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:31:11 PM EDT
No participation ribbons in mountain climbing.  
You either make it to the top and back down, or you failed.  
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:34:13 PM EDT
Even if they did, it doesn't count if you don't make it back down.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:43:19 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DanishM1Garand:


Even if they did, it doesn't count if you don't make it back down.
View Quote
Pretty much.  



Just because someone falls from 120,000 feet with a parachute and dies on impact doesnt mean it was a successful jump and that person will not receive credit for anything,
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 9:52:58 PM EDT
Everest threads are always interesting...
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:00:03 PM EDT
I want to believe they made it.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:24:35 PM EDT
Doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things.

A lot of people could have gone up if they didn't care about coming back down.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:31:02 PM EDT
I do know that Aleister Crowley did not summit K2, despite being on the mountain a long long time
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:43:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
No.  Would not have made the "third step"


http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


https://skeptoid.com/images/everest.jpg
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Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
No.  Would not have made the "third step"

In 1960, a Chinese expedition made the first verified climb of the Second Step, a 30-meter wall requiring real technical climbing skills, and four of the five who tried failed to climb it. They succeeded only by the climbing technique called courte-échelle, where men literally climb on top of each other like a circus act. Mallory was a very good climber, but Irvine was not. It's possible they could have done the same thing; but with only two of them, getting back down would have been a lot trickier.



http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


https://skeptoid.com/images/everest.jpg


Noel Odell saw them on top of the second step.  The third step is easier than the second.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:46:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brown424:
No participation ribbons in mountain climbing.  
You either make it to the top and back down, or you failed.  
View Quote



This.

Unless you build a house and live up there, climbing a mountain involves both up, and down.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:50:33 PM EDT
I doubt they made it. In any case the summit is only half-way.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:52:21 PM EDT
They never made it to the top.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:55:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Veracity:
Guys,

Too much to type, but I believe there's evidence that they did reach the summit in June 1924.

**One eye witness account from base camp,ma guy named Odell, has the climbers moving at a brisk pace at roughly noon time on the "Second Step". If accurate, this account would put them at a good pace to summit by roughly 5:30pm. Some have disputed the accuracy of this account.

**Notes recovered off of Mallory's body indicate that they had three O2 bottles each when they set out that morning.

**Mallory's goggles were found stowed inside his jacket....indicating that they died after the sun set...most likely on their way back down.

**The picture of Mallory's wife (which he carried solely for the purpose of placing it at the summit) was not in his pockets.

During a Chinese expedition in 1975, a climber reported seeing a body that, due to the description of the clothing, is widely believed to be Mallory's climbing partner, Sandy Irvine. Irvine was carrying a Kodak camera. Kodak engineers say that the film may still be good.

If his body is ever recovered and that film is successfully developed, we may finally know.

Thoughts?

View Quote

I would like to think they did make it.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:56:44 PM EDT
A lengthy but interesting article on the subject.

http://www.outsideonline.com/1909046/ghosts-everest
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 10:57:08 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Whamo:
I want to believe they made it.
View Quote


Yup.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:01:57 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Whamo:


I want to believe they made it.

View Quote
Same.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:13:23 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:


Noel Odell saw them on top of the second step.  The third step is easier than the second.
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Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
No.  Would not have made the "third step"

In 1960, a Chinese expedition made the first verified climb of the Second Step, a 30-meter wall requiring real technical climbing skills, and four of the five who tried failed to climb it. They succeeded only by the climbing technique called courte-échelle, where men literally climb on top of each other like a circus act. Mallory was a very good climber, but Irvine was not. It's possible they could have done the same thing; but with only two of them, getting back down would have been a lot trickier.



http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


https://skeptoid.com/images/everest.jpg


Noel Odell saw them on top of the second step.  The third step is easier than the second.


His claim to seeing a dot get over the second step, in 5 minutes no less, is very much disputed, even by himself.

It would be nice if they made it, but I don't think they did.  Didn't photos pre-climb show him with 2 pairs of goggles?
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:20:49 PM EDT
You have to wonder. Do they just leave all the old ropes and ladders all over the mountain or does someone go up and clean them off every now and then?  You know pollution and litter and junk






Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:27:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 11:28:44 PM EDT by Kharn]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -Apocalypto-:
You have to wonder. Do they just leave all the old ropes and ladders all over the mountain or does someone go up and clean them off every now and then?  You know pollution and litter and junk

http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg

View Quote

The mountain destroys the equipment regularly,  the sherpas go up early to fix the equipment before their clients set out, but there isn't enough oxygen in the tanks to do litter clean up.

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:30:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Veracity:



Irrelevant?

That seems a bit harsh.

Living to tell the tale is the most important thing.....however, I still want those guys to get the recognition if proof should ever emerge someday.

It would just mean adding an asterisk to the record book. First summit vs first summit and lived to have a beer at base camp.
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Originally Posted By Veracity:
Originally Posted By LE6920:
Originally Posted By Veracity:
Guys,

Too much to type, but I believe there's evidence that they did reach the summit in June 1924.

**One eye witness account from base camp,ma guy named Odell, has the climbers moving at a brisk pace at roughly noon time on the "Second Step". If accurate, this account would put them at a good pace to summit by roughly 5:30pm. Some have disputed the accuracy of this account.

**Notes recovered off of Mallory's body indicate that they had three O2 bottles each when they set out that morning.

**Mallory's goggles were found stowed inside his jacket....indicating that they died after the sun set...most likely on their way back down.

**The picture of Mallory's wife (which he carried solely for the purpose of placing it at the summit) was not in his pockets.

During a Chinese expedition in 1975, a climber reported seeing a body that, due to the description of the clothing, is widely believed to be Mallory's climbing partner, Sandy Irvine. Irvine was carrying a Kodak camera. Kodak engineers say that the film may still be good.

If his body is ever recovered and that film is successfully developed, we may finally know.

Thoughts?




Irrelevant if you don't make it back down.

I do not think they made it to top either.



Irrelevant?

That seems a bit harsh.

Living to tell the tale is the most important thing.....however, I still want those guys to get the recognition if proof should ever emerge someday.

It would just mean adding an asterisk to the record book. First summit vs first summit and lived to have a beer at base camp.


Nope. Just my opinion but a one way mission doesn't count. What's the point if you don't make it back down?
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:31:36 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kharn:

The mountain destroys the equipment regularly,  the sherpas go up early to fix the equipment before their clients set out, but there isn't enough oxygen in the tanks to do litter clean up.

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By Kharn:
Originally Posted By -Apocalypto-:
You have to wonder. Do they just leave all the old ropes and ladders all over the mountain or does someone go up and clean them off every now and then?  You know pollution and litter and junk

http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg


The mountain destroys the equipment regularly,  the sherpas go up early to fix the equipment before their clients set out, but there isn't enough oxygen in the tanks to do litter clean up.

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile



I would think the ladders survive a while. Ropes, not so much.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:39:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ACDer:
A lengthy but interesting article on the subject.

http://www.outsideonline.com/1909046/ghosts-everest
View Quote


That was a good read. Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:48:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 11:50:22 PM EDT by MonkeyGrip]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -Apocalypto-:
You have to wonder. Do they just leave all the old ropes and ladders all over the mountain or does someone go up and clean them off every now and then?  You know pollution and litter and junk

http://www.everestpeaceproject.com/upload_images/gallery/photo/large/466.jpg

View Quote


Those ladders are how one gets up that "Second Step" since the Chinese team put the first made it up and put the first ladders there in 1960.  Few, if any have made it up that without the ladders.    

Mallory would not have made it with what he had, as much as I'd like that to be the case.  

Where there's little air, it's all you can do to lift yourself in a most basic way.  It's all about O2, and the lack thereof.  


Link Posted: 12/30/2015 11:56:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2015 12:02:05 AM EDT by MonkeyGrip]
One simply has no strength at those altitudes, even with O2 bottles.  

That's why no one can get all those dead bodies off of Everest:

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20151008-the-tragic-story-of-mt-everests-most-famous-dead-body


http://imgur.com/gallery/4UJj0

So making up the 2nd Step without those ladders is impossible for most.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:05:53 AM EDT
I do. Conrad Anker free climbed the second step, after taking down the ladder. Then objectively rated the second step, which fell at the top Mallorys ability. Mallory had climbed the same rating, just way lower altitude. Anker also climb some routes with the period clothing, noting it was lighter and warmer than he expected. He also pointed out the hobnail boots would be beneficial in the yellowband, where modern crampons are dicey. However they had a lot less grip in the ice than crampons. Initially Anker said no way Mallory made it. A few years later, after free climbing the 2nd step, and wearing the period clothing. He said his opinion had changed, he believes its more likely he made it, and fell on the way back down.
Also Mallorys camera was missing. If they locate Sandy, and he has it. Its a pretty good sign that he handed it to him to take a summit pic of Mallory.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:18:33 AM EDT
Ok.....

Let me turn the tables a bit on you "doesn't count" guys.

I completely understand your point about a successful climb. Completely.

If the Apollo 11 astronauts had died on the return trip, would that negate everything they did before they died? Would they not be the first men to walk on the moon because they didn't come home alive?

Also, just prior to Lindbergh completing his successful trans Atlantic flight, two Frenchmen attempted the same thing in the opposite direction. In rural Maine, many "ear witnesses" reported hearing an airplane above the overcast on the day of their scheduled arrival. (Airplanes were like Bigfoot sightings back then) It is widely believed that they crashed in the woods in Maine. Over the years, accounts of aircraft wreckage have surfaced....an aluminum engine block in the middle of nowhere, etc.

Some have said that if that engine block can ever be found, it would change history. If those historians believe that, then why can't we give credit to other ill fated missions?

Just a thought.

Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:21:27 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By ACDer:
A lengthy but interesting article on the subject.

http://www.outsideonline.com/1909046/ghosts-everest
View Quote



Yes.

Coincidentally, this is the article that I reread today......and it sparked this thread.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:25:18 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Veracity:
Ok.....

Let me turn the tables a bit on you "doesn't count" guys.

I completely understand your point about a successful climb. Completely.

If the Apollo 11 astronauts had died on the return trip, would that negate everything they did before they died? Would they not be the first men to walk on the moon because they didn't come home alive?

Also, just prior to Lindbergh completing his successful trans Atlantic flight, two Frenchmen attempted the same thing in the opposite direction. In rural Maine, many "ear witnesses" reported hearing an airplane above the overcast on the day of their scheduled arrival. (Airplanes were like Bigfoot sightings back then) It is widely believed that they crashed in the woods in Maine. Over the years, accounts of aircraft wreckage have surfaced....an aluminum engine block in the middle of nowhere, etc.

Some have said that if that engine block can ever be found, it would change history. If those historians believe that, then why can't we give credit to other ill fated missions?

Just a thought.

View Quote


Kennedy said the goal was to send a man to the Moon and return him safely to the Earth before the decade was out.

Apollo 12 flew in December 1969, if Apollo 11 had failed there was still one more chance.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:28:23 AM EDT
I just don't think they made it.  Irvine was just not in the same class as Mallory as a climber.  Failed to summit, descent in darkness, Irvine takes a spill and they are gone. . .
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:29:43 AM EDT
Do I care? No, not a bit.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:30:57 AM EDT
They never made it.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:34:01 AM EDT
How hard can it be to locate Sandy?
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:43:10 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By stevem1a:


Kennedy said the goal was to send a man to the Moon and return him safely to the Earth before the decade was out.

Apollo 12 flew in December 1969, if Apollo 11 had failed there was still one more chance.
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Originally Posted By stevem1a:
Originally Posted By Veracity:
Ok.....

Let me turn the tables a bit on you "doesn't count" guys.

I completely understand your point about a successful climb. Completely.

If the Apollo 11 astronauts had died on the return trip, would that negate everything they did before they died? Would they not be the first men to walk on the moon because they didn't come home alive?

Also, just prior to Lindbergh completing his successful trans Atlantic flight, two Frenchmen attempted the same thing in the opposite direction. In rural Maine, many "ear witnesses" reported hearing an airplane above the overcast on the day of their scheduled arrival. (Airplanes were like Bigfoot sightings back then) It is widely believed that they crashed in the woods in Maine. Over the years, accounts of aircraft wreckage have surfaced....an aluminum engine block in the middle of nowhere, etc.

Some have said that if that engine block can ever be found, it would change history. If those historians believe that, then why can't we give credit to other ill fated missions?

Just a thought.



Kennedy said the goal was to send a man to the Moon and return him safely to the Earth before the decade was out.

Apollo 12 flew in December 1969, if Apollo 11 had failed there was still one more chance.



Thank you for your reply, but don't duck the question!

(You know it would still count)

Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:46:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2015 12:49:51 AM EDT by Veracity]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SuperSixOne:
How hard can it be to locate Sandy?
View Quote





There's a guy who claims he sees a shape on satellite images of Everest that he believes is Irvine. Can't raise the cash for a fly over for better pics...or the big cash for a salvage mission.

Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:46:23 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
I think they made it.
View Quote



I always have as well.
But like making for the poles, it only counts if you get back.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:49:59 AM EDT
I say no. I think I remember reading that Mallory was spotted well beneath the summit, for a brief moment, with not enough time to get there.
 I am by no means any kind of authority, but I believe I read it in either Krakauers book , Brashears book , or Weathers book.

These threads are always fun for me, as a guy with zero interest in climbing, but I read the books in one sitting. For some reason, I can't put the book down till it's done.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:50:43 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Ohio:



I always have as well.
But like making for the poles, it only counts if you get back.
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Originally Posted By Ohio:
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
I think they made it.



I always have as well.
But like making for the poles, it only counts if you get back.


Scott got a participation trophy.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:52:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2015 12:52:59 AM EDT by Veracity]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SurfAnimal:
I say no. I think I remember reading that Mallory was spotted well beneath the summit, for a brief moment, with not enough time to get there.
 I am by no means any kind of authority, but I believe I read it in either Krakauers book , Brashears book , or Weathers book.

These threads are always fun for me, as a guy with zero interest in climbing, but I read the books in one sitting. For some reason, I can't put the book down till it's done.
View Quote



Yes.

The link above somewhere in this thread has the exact eye witness testimony you're referring to.

However, it's more promising than you think........if it's to be believed.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:54:49 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SurfAnimal:
I say no. I think I remember reading that Mallory was spotted well beneath the summit, for a brief moment, with not enough time to get there.
 I am by no means any kind of authority, but I believe I read it in either Krakauers book , Brashears book , or Weathers book.

These threads are always fun for me, as a guy with zero interest in climbing, but I read the books in one sitting. For some reason, I can't put the book down till it's done.
View Quote


That was Odell.  The quibble is whether he spotted them at the top of the first or second step.  If the first, the question of the second remains open.  

If he saw them on the top of the second step, and he seemed to feel like they were (depending on when he was asked), they almost certainly made the summit.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 12:55:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Veracity:



Yes.

The link above somewhere in this thread has the exact eye witness testimony you're referring to.

However, it's more promising than you think........if it's to be believed.
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Originally Posted By Veracity:
Originally Posted By SurfAnimal:
I say no. I think I remember reading that Mallory was spotted well beneath the summit, for a brief moment, with not enough time to get there.
 I am by no means any kind of authority, but I believe I read it in either Krakauers book , Brashears book , or Weathers book.

These threads are always fun for me, as a guy with zero interest in climbing, but I read the books in one sitting. For some reason, I can't put the book down till it's done.



Yes.

The link above somewhere in this thread has the exact eye witness testimony you're referring to.

However, it's more promising than you think........if it's to be believed.


Cool, I didn't click the link.
(But I will tomorrow) !  
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