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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/24/2005 4:36:17 AM EDT
I have seen these handheld computers to diagnose problems with later model cars. Who makes the best one for the money?

Also, does anyone make an interface and software so you can just use your laptop for this purpose?

I need this for 4 vehicles ....
'94 Jeep Cherokee, '98 Jeep Cherokee, '95 Ford F150, '95 Honda Accord
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:14:09 AM EDT
I believe there are some car<->computer cables being made, and software to go with them.


Google search for OBDII cable should find 'em for ya.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:22:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 5:31:16 AM EDT by skid2964]
Thanks, I didnt even know what the technolgy was called.

So far, I found this software: "AutoTap" comes with cables, software, etc ... only $179

Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:35:56 AM EDT
FWIW, I think the OBDII standard was implemented in 97 or 98. You'll probably end up needing something else for the older vehicles.

And, of course, the reason for the OBDII standard was that GM, Ford, Honda, Toyota, etc were all using different and propriatary standards. So you may be looking at buying an OBDII cable for your '98, and then separate cables for the older jeep, ford, and honda. I don't know what their respective standards were called though.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:41:42 AM EDT
According to the information I found. The standard was set in 1996 and some 1995 cars have it. The Honda Accord shows up on the list and some Ford vehicles (for 1995), but my truck was not specifically listed. So I may be able to use this only on my '95 Honda and possibly the truck. But, the reason i started thinking about this in the first place was beacuase my daughters Honda was showing a red light on the engine status. it did say "V6" for the Honda, hers is a 4, i may be out of luck on it also.

Reference: www.obdii.com/connector.html


Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
FWIW, I think the OBDII standard was implemented in 97 or 98. You'll probably end up needing something else for the older vehicles.

And, of course, the reason for the OBDII standard was that GM, Ford, Honda, Toyota, etc were all using different and propriatary standards. So you may be looking at buying an OBDII cable for your '98, and then separate cables for the older jeep, ford, and honda. I don't know what their respective standards were called though.

Link Posted: 8/24/2005 7:37:02 AM EDT
Ah, ok...I was just off by a couple years.


Then again the newest car I've owned is a 93, I just know about the OBDII stuff from dealing with friend's new cars, and the oldest they've had is a '98.

On the other hand, there's a big following for home-built (ie, cheaper) cables and free software for older GMs, there might be a similar following and effort behind jeeps and fords and hondas.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 9:47:51 AM EDT
Indeed OBDII showed it's face in '94, was fairly common in '95 and was in full force in 1996. I use Snap-On's MT2500 Scanner.

damian@adcofirearms.com
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 12:24:27 PM EDT
Look on EBay too, I found several when I was looking into them a little while ago. I believe there are also different style of plug on some vehicles. Like 2 or 3 different types if I remember right. They usually differ by brand, not model. The one's I found on ebay usually listed the vehicles they worked with. There were a number of different kinds of software as well, everything from just reading and clearing codes, to full monitoring and data logging of everything from all the senors in the engine, to calculating 0-60, 1/4 mile, 1/8 mile, horsepower, torque. Basically, as far as software, you get what you pay for.

Oh, I hope your laptop has a serial port on it too.
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