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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/26/2004 4:20:57 AM EST
So, I'm cleaning out my garage and decide to check on my .22 and pellet rifle I have stored in a doskocil ALLWEATHER double rifle case. You know, the one with the oring and the pressure valve? I open it up, and my '55 Reminton .22 (my first rifle, my DADS first rifle) has mildew and surface rust all over it. I'm PISSED.

AVOID doskocil cases.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:22:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/26/2004 4:23:53 AM EST by ARDOC]
If you trapped air and moisture in the case before you closed it maybe its your fault. Maybe we should just avoid BBs.

You left it in a garage with probable extreme weather changes. The seals dont last forever.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:27:02 AM EST
I had 6 big ass desicant packs inside the case. The case is sold as an extreame weather case.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:28:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/26/2004 4:28:41 AM EST by Kharn]
All cases will cause rust if you store firearms in them, the foam holds moisture in contact with the firearm so you'll get spotting whereever the foam touches the finish.

Even $200 Starlight cases will cause surface rust if you arent smart about it, foam cases are for travel not for storage.

Kharn
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:28:50 AM EST
So, you live in GA? Lots of humidity there & things seem to do better when it can breathe. I'd get a safe.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:35:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By Kharn:
foam cases are for travel not for storage.

Kharn



Well worth repeating again... even a closed cell foam case is for transport only. It's always a good idea to change out your foam in the Doskocil cases to a closed cell foam... I found 4'x8'x4" sheets of closed cell foam for $20 bux each at a local arts and crafts store...

Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:42:45 AM EST
I've had nothing but success with my case - maybe you just had some bum luck.

Link Posted: 9/26/2004 5:35:37 AM EST
If you look inside where the foam contacts the item, it always will leace some residue. Its attacts moisture as pointed out. The firearms should be taken out and put into a safe with something like a golden rod. Thats the safest way to go.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 6:56:33 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 9:41:39 AM EST
BB,


Now that I think the other guys have driven the point across that cases are for transport ONLY. I too have learned my lesson. The same thing happened to me. ... Sucks, I know.

GET A SAFE! Ever since, I have never had rust issues again. If you know a good gunsmith, I would bring him the rifle to clean it up. Rust is like a cancer and if not 100% removed it will come back.

Sorry to hear about it.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 11:09:40 AM EST
The foam can also sponge up any oil covering the firearm.

Many years ago, I had occasion to leave a number of rifles in somebody else’s unheated attic for 10 years(!!). I simply coated them heavily with oil and left them exposed.

When I finally retrieved them, none had any rust whatsoever.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 11:11:35 AM EST
The same feature that keeps moisture out, locks it in.
It doesn't matter if you had dessicant bags in there. They can only absorb so much.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 11:17:37 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 11:25:17 AM EST
If you really need to go all out with pressure valves ETC. Then get your self a "can" of compressed nitrogen. You can get them from places that sell Compressed gas for soda machines etc. then using a pressure tight case flood the case with nitrogen gas so no oxygen remains. thats how thet do it in museums for iron pieces. Water does'nt cause Rust, Oxygen does!! though water does contibute to mildew. it's an expensive and difficult process but it can be done. Next time you goto a museum with firearms look at the case it's in, you'll see a gas valve for pumping in the inert gas.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 8:32:12 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 8:36:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/26/2004 8:38:07 PM EST by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 8:41:20 PM EST
I have the cheap 2 rifle hard Doskocil case with no O-rings that I use for storage but I keep in in my bedroom closet. No rust or anything. Too much temp change and condensation forming in a garage. Maybe the foam was damp?
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 10:30:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
If you trapped air and moisture in the case before you closed it maybe its your fault. Maybe we should just avoid BBs.

You left it in a garage with probable extreme weather changes. The seals dont last forever.



I agree with ARDOC. I could understand BB being pissed if he lived in Nevada or Arizona. But GA? Cmon, GA has some of the highest humidity in the country. Perhaps a light coat of oil as a preservative internally and externally could have prevented the start of the corrosion.

Also, checking your stored guns every so often allows you to catch deterioration early on. Kinda like early detection for cancer.....
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 2:47:54 AM EST
I think we need to do a gun safe group buy.

Bob
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:50:24 AM EST
For long-term storage, I wrapped all of my guns in VCI paper and then stuffed them into Seal-A-Meal bags. Many of the bags pinholed from sharp corners on the guns, but I'm hopeful that very little moisture will get in through the pinholes anyway, and the VCI paper should prevent corrosion from occurring if any does.

These guys sold me a roll of VCI paper for about a tenth the cost of what I could find it for locally:
http://www.corrosionvci.com/cortec_vpci_vci_and_eco_catalogs.htm
IIRC, it came as a 1ft x 200yd roll with perforations every foot (to form 12x12 squares, or 12xwhatever sheets).

(At least, I think it was them. Looks like the right name.)
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:58:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
The foam can also sponge up any oil covering the firearm.

while oil can degrade most foam lining material, it also helps keep oil on the rifle. the foam gets 'conditioned' by constant exsposure to oil.

i keep a very exspensive match rifle in a foam case for months on end without any rust because i treat the foam with silicone spray oil and wipe the blued parts down with oil prior to putting the rifle away in the case.



+1
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:13:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 6:20:45 AM EST by BB]
Guys, this is the first I have ever heard of this. If I was "not in my right mind" then I know an awful lot of people that are equally not in their right minds. I would have thought that a case designed to be water/air tight would have protected these guns better than them not being in an airtight container; it just stands to reason. In the Navy we kept all stuff that we didn't want to corrode in such cases, and never had a problem, 6 months underway in ocean air. I've never really had this problem before; I have had hundreds of guns over the years but never had any of them rust, mainly because they have been in airconditioned spaces. These two were in the garage because I thought they would be ok in this case. Guess it just goes to show you are always learning.

Like I said, if this is SOP and common knowledge, nobody I know is aware of it. I will spread the word. Now, however, I guess I'm going to need a safe or at least to bring these in an airconditioned area.

I appreciate all the responses.

Thanks-
BB
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:44:14 AM EST
NP BB. There are a lot of good safe companies out there like Liberty (that's what I have), Fort Knox, Heritage, etc. Depending on the size you need you can find a really nice safe from a well known manufacturer between $1500.00-$2000.00 (even cheaper if you can find a used one from someone who needs a larger safe). If you live in a very humid area (and I think you do) I would suggest a "De-Humidifying" kit. Most manufacturers offer these kits for their products and from what I hear they work pretty good.

Good luck with your first safe purchase, Bro. Outside of your gun collection a safe is probably the most important purchase you can make for the guns and your family.



Link Posted: 9/27/2004 8:52:45 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 9:09:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 9:10:17 AM EST by Fred-in-PA]

Originally Posted By ishoot2live:
NP BB. There are a lot of good safe companies out there like Liberty (that's what I have), Fort Knox, Heritage, etc. Depending on the size you need you can find a really nice safe from a well known manufacturer between $1500.00-$2000.00 (even cheaper if you can find a used one from someone who needs a larger safe). If you live in a very humid area (and I think you do) I would suggest a "De-Humidifying" kit. Most manufacturers offer these kits for their products and from what I hear they work pretty good.

Good luck with your first safe purchase, Bro. Outside of your gun collection a safe is probably the most important purchase you can make for the guns and your family.







Yep,
Get a safe with a de-humidifier. No gun case (even with desicant packs) is designed for long term storage. Not to mention that the slings and stocks will import their mold and mildew from "outside" to "inside" the case. I make it a practice not to store nay firearm inside any gun case (other than when traveling to and from the range)
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 9:14:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Kharn:
All cases will cause rust if you store firearms in them, the foam holds moisture in contact with the firearm so you'll get spotting whereever the foam touches the finish.

Even $200 Starlight cases will cause surface rust if you arent smart about it, foam cases are for travel not for storage.

Kharn



+1.

Link Posted: 9/27/2004 9:45:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
The foam can also sponge up any oil covering the firearm.

while oil can degrade most foam lining material, it also helps keep oil on the rifle. the foam gets 'conditioned' by constant exsposure to oil.

i keep a very exspensive match rifle in a foam case for months on end without any rust because i treat the foam with silicone spray oil and wipe the blued parts down with oil prior to putting the rifle away in the case.



Yup! This is what you've got to do if you use foam cases.
Also, I hate to be a scold, but shame on you if you leave a firearm in any case indefinately. It's important to go over all firearms at least twice a year to reoil the bore, wipe down the surfaces with an oil rag and just generally check the thing out. I keep a Post-It Note with every firearm I own with the date of last maintanence printed on it.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 9:49:54 AM EST
I never leave guns in cases period and that is why any brand will do that if there is water present. Me and my friend went DUCK HUNTING one day down south it was a 2 hour drive back. I told him to take his 870 out of the bag when we left. When we got home NO SHIt the fucking thing was RED with rust all over it.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 10:54:40 AM EST

Originally Posted By Coolio:
Also, I hate to be a scold, but shame on you if you leave a firearm in any case indefinately. It's important to go over all firearms at least twice a year to reoil the bore, wipe down the surfaces with an oil rag and just generally check the thing out. I keep a Post-It Note with every firearm I own with the date of last maintanence printed on it.



Yeah, this happened over the course of about 8 months.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 11:44:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 2:55:18 PM EST by Ky_Bob]
I had my prized lever action in a starlight case for about 72 hours and got a few pin pricks of rust. The gun was pretty dry though and entirely my fault. So now I am going to pick it up after having it tefloned in flat black.

Bob
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 11:54:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 11:55:14 AM EST by fight4yourrights]

Originally Posted By DarkStar:


Well worth repeating again... even a closed cell foam case is for transport only.




Closed cell foam has open cells that can hold moisture the minute you cut it.


You can heat seal the surface, but you are still likely to have troubles.


Besides, I've never seen a Doskocil case with an AIR VALVE.

No air valve, NO hermetic seal. It's that simple. To fully seal a case, you must have a air valve to relieve that pressure. If not, you can't open the case when you have a vacuum inside.

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