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Posted: 4/12/2008 4:33:02 AM EST
Got this email from the Cubmaster:


M--- - as I told you i am NOT NOT NOT a camper...I was hoping maybe the boys could do most of the cooking this year for dinner. I have no ideas about this however. Do you have any suggestions about things they could do, maybe over the fire, that would be safe?


Need some thoughts from all of you old scouts and parents of scouts... Also some ideas for activities for this year. It's just the overnight family campout, so nothing too elaborate. The ladies who organized that last ones we attended have moved on with their sons to Boy Scouts...

Thanks for any ideas.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:36:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/12/2008 4:36:44 AM EST by ktrout01]
Let the kids have fun with some beans in a dutch oven and weenies on sticks. Hand the cubmaster an MRE and call it good. Breakfast can be scrambled eggs and toast. A bushel of fresh fruit and you're done. It's all about the boys. Make it fun for them.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:40:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/12/2008 4:41:30 AM EST by PBIR]
My favorite in scouts was always hobo meals. Aluminum foil filled with ground beef, thin-sliced or small diced potatoes, peppers. Toss the packets onto coals and cover. Let em bake, then salt and pepper - delicious! The cool thing about this is the scouts can assemble (for the most part) these themselves.

Hot dogs, beef stew, smores...eggs & bacon for breakfast plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:41:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/12/2008 4:59:04 AM EST by ADaughen]
Dutch oven pizza was my favorite and if you have the coals hot enough you can do a dutch oven (apple, peach, cherry) cobbler afterwards.
Pizza:
www.scoutorama.com/recipe/rec_display.cfm?rec_id=15
Cobbler:
www.scoutorama.com/recipe/rec_display.cfm?rec_id=39
(at leadership camp I put ours on the main fire and it was cooked in <15 minutes)

For our family campouts we usually had the adults make a big roast pig (Philipino scout master ) and each of the squads would do a side dish... Corn pudding, baked beans, etc.


+1 on the hobo meals. Those were pretty good. You could do a polish sausage rather than beef, to mix it up.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:42:34 AM EST
Aluminum foil and a dutch oven.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:44:07 AM EST
Haha, some awsome ideas. We are taking notes! Keep em coming!
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:44:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By PBIR:
My favorite in scouts was always hobo meals. Aluminum foil filled with ground beef, thin-sliced or small diced potatoes, peppers. Toss the packets onto coals and cover. Let em bake, then salt and pepper - delicious! The cool thing about this is the scouts can assemble (for the most part) these themselves.

Hot dogs, beef stew, smores...eggs & bacon for breakfast plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.


Yup, hobo meals ftw! Some hot dogs to supplement them always go good, and don't forget the s'mores.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:45:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/12/2008 4:59:20 AM EST by ADaughen]

Originally Posted By PBIR:

plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.



Doug boys?

take 2" broom handle.
wrap crecent roll around handle making a pocket.
cook until golden brown and slightly crispy.
fill with pie filling.
eat.


ETA:

Google PWNS!
www.scoutorama.com/recipe/


For a night snack we used to do a "walking taco" or pizza bread. Walking taco is the personal sized bag of doritios, toss some ground beef with taco seasoning in on top, cheese and whatever else the scout wanted (salsa, onions, tomatos, lettuce).

Pizza bread, well, it is just a loaf of bread + can of pizza sauce + a few bags of cheese and pepperoni. I don't remember how they were cooked, though.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:47:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By PBIR:
My favorite in scouts was always hobo meals. Aluminum foil filled with ground beef, thin-sliced or small diced potatoes, peppers. Toss the packets onto coals and cover. Let em bake, then salt and pepper - delicious! The cool thing about this is the scouts can assemble (for the most part) these themselves.

Hot dogs, beef stew, smores...eggs & bacon for breakfast plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.


I forgot all about hobo dinners !!! I used to LOVE those !
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:49:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By ADaughen:


Doug boys?

take 2" broom handle.
wrap crecent roll around handle making a pocket.
cook until golden brown and slightly crispy.
fill with pie filling.
eat.


Man that sounds good. I'm going to try that with the son next camping trip.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:52:56 AM EST
We always got cheap steaks and put them on a stick and cooked them over an open fire. A grate is helpfull for this stuff though. A pineapple upside down cake in a dutch oven is always good.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:56:53 AM EST
Dutch oven or hobo meals.

Breakfast: fruit, oatmeal, and bisquick on a stick with jam/jelly

We also made a reflector oven with aluminum foil and had hot glazed donuts during th night campfire
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:56:54 AM EST
Foil packs are good - just look out for burned hands. Another meal idea is a big pot of stew or chili - let them all take a turn peeling a potato, cuttting up some meat, seasoning it and stirring it and then dip it out into their mess kits like an old trail cook.

Maybe do a little "survival" training where they can play with a short compas course - something real easy and put them in teams, if you have enough boys.
Dessert waits at the end of their little orientation trail, in boxes marked for each team.
Either use something simple like cookies or give them s'more makings so they can celebrate their successful compass course.
Its gotta be real simple but a good way to introduce them into orienteering with a real treat at the end.

Then of course, its on to the campfire (C-A-M-P-F-I-R-E......SONG!) where you start to tell scary stories, scare the crap out of them, and they all wind up in your tent or yoyu have to take half of them home.

Ya gotta love it.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 4:57:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By PBIR:

Originally Posted By ADaughen:


Doug boys?

take 2" broom handle.
wrap crecent roll around handle making a pocket.
cook until golden brown and slightly crispy.
fill with pie filling.
eat.


Man that sounds good. I'm going to try that with the son next camping trip.



My Grandma and Grandpa from PA got my siblings and I hooked on those. They make them almost every time they have a fire.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:01:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By PBIR:
My favorite in scouts was always hobo meals. Aluminum foil filled with ground beef, thin-sliced or small diced potatoes, peppers. Toss the packets onto coals and cover. Let em bake, then salt and pepper - delicious! The cool thing about this is the scouts can assemble (for the most part) these themselves.

Hot dogs, beef stew, smores...eggs & bacon for breakfast plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.


This guy read my mind.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:06:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By ktrout01:

Originally Posted By PBIR:
My favorite in scouts was always hobo meals. Aluminum foil filled with ground beef, thin-sliced or small diced potatoes, peppers. Toss the packets onto coals and cover. Let em bake, then salt and pepper - delicious! The cool thing about this is the scouts can assemble (for the most part) these themselves.

Hot dogs, beef stew, smores...eggs & bacon for breakfast plus some crescent rolls cooked by twisting the dough around a clean stick leaned over the fire. There are a ton of options really.


I forgot all about hobo dinners !!! I used to LOVE those !


Was king when I was a kid.

We did two ways all helped prepare and then each made own. Or you had to bring one already made. I think the first was better. Kids learned to peel potatoes etc.

They brought a 50-pound bag potatoes, 20-pound meat, 20-pound bag onions, etc. We set up in teams and peeled and cut. then each had to fill and cook own.
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:21:13 AM EST
Hobo dinners work great but you need to remember to get pre-cooked meat to go in them , Cub Scouts don't cook much and one of them will have some un-cooked meat in a hobo dinner if you leave it up to them to do the cooking !

I was a Cub Master for years and now a Scout Master !

You can get pre-cooked chicken and beef patties at any store , slice up some carrots , potatoes , onion's and a can of mushroom soup with some mixed spices , throw a little of each in some foil and then in the coals for about 20 mins and eat !

We do this almost every BS campout we go to for the first nights meal !
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:28:22 AM EST
Here is a thread I did on Dutch Oven Cooking , the Scouts like doing this !

Dutch Oven Cooking
Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:36:28 AM EST
Have you ever had a U.S. Flag Retirement Ceremony? Ask around if anyone has a U.S. Flag that can no longer be flown (torn, dirty). Since you already have the campfire going, have the ceremony after the meal. Here's a website to look at or you can do a google search for "US Flag Retirement Ceremony"

http://post369.columbus.oh.us/scouting.d/flag.retire.html

There isn't just one ceremony that has to be followed. As long as respect is payed to the flag you can make up your own ceremony.

Link Posted: 4/12/2008 5:48:14 AM EST
hobo meals for dinner, lets the boys do something (have some back-ups for that 10% that have disasters)

Dutch oven deserts for all. I used to round up abunch of DO's and make a variation on the "dump" cake/cobbler. Canned fruit or pie filling on the bottom of the DO and cake mix mixed per directions on top. Takes about a box and a half or so depends on amount of fruit and and how much the cake fluffs up. With pie fillings you need to use almost all the liquid called for in the box directions, with canned fruit, you can measure the liquid from the can and add water up to box directions. (A few of the adults can be doing this while dinner is cleaned up and the campfire is going on. Then desert is ready after campfire.) I did up to 6 dutch ovens worth a few times for cub family camps. By making 2 stakcks of 3 ovens and changing order while adding coals you even out cooking times.

white or yellow cake with peaches, cherries, spice cake with apples and the moms will kidnap you and throw their husbands away if you make one with dark chocolate cake with cherry pie filling.

For breakfast a modern version of the hobo dinner.

Use heavy duty zip-loc bags, break two eggs in the bag, have an "omelette bar" and let the diners add their choice of grated cheese, crumbled bacon, crumbled sausage, chopped green onions, salsa, etc. Seal the bags, squeeze the bags, to break and mix the eggs and ingredients. Adult assistance required her - Make sure the bags is well sealed and put in big pot of boiling water after about a minute, take the bag out and squeeze it a few times to get the uncooked egg in the middle out to the outside, return to boiling water until cooked through. Retrieve, and eat as is, add ketchup or put in warmed tortillas forbreakfast burritos. Take care in handling in boiling water otherwise you end up cooking in egg flower soup. YOU NEED HEAVY DUTY BAGS REGULAR BAGS FALL APART.

If families do their own breakfasts, You can expect a mutiny if you fix extra large popping fresh cinnamon rolls in your DO and wander through the camp and check on the troops as any good leader would do to make sure everything is going well. Camp breakfasts for those who haven't camped much can be challenging without a full home kitchen for some.

(After the DO deserts and cinnamon rolls you can expect to give a few simple DO lessons sessions for Dads who have never used them before)

A DO breakfast that is popular "scrapple" (although only roughly similar to real scrapple)

Marie Callendars cornbread mix (only need to add water), sliced little smokies (they are pre-cooked, you can fry bacon or real sausage on site and crumbel) and sliced apples. Bake until cornbread is done.

I usually add tinfoil liners for my DOs when I cook for a large group like a family camp. Otherwise the clean-up is a little lengthy, and if you are the Cubmaster you have other things to be doing.
Link Posted: 4/13/2008 5:38:20 AM EST
Link Posted: 4/13/2008 5:41:56 AM EST
snipe hunt
Link Posted: 4/13/2008 6:01:38 AM EST
Redneck crab boil:
large pot and propane burner, add water,salt,old bay,onion and celery. Bring to boil for 30min, add chicken legs and thighs,Cajun style smoked sausage, a bag of new red potatoes and frozen corn on the cob. Bring to a low boil for @30-45 minutes, eat.
Link Posted: 4/13/2008 6:09:27 AM EST
We used to do the Hobo meals, but the MRE's were the bomb diggity. We loved those things more than anything.

We had a coleman stove they would often use for breakfast.
Link Posted: 4/13/2008 6:18:00 AM EST
Let the kids try their hands at their OWN cooking.

Remember this: No matter what, a kid that age will eat ANYTHING he cooks himself.

Meat too raw? Kid'll wolf it down and clamor for more meat to cook.

Potato burned to a crisp? No problem, the kid'll eat a charcoal briquette and love it if he did it himself.

I swear, you could hand a kid a road killed racoon and if you help him guy it and let him cook it, he'll eat it and brag for weeks about eating the damned thing.

It's all about the kids doing things.
Link Posted: 4/18/2008 6:24:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Let the kids try their hands at their OWN cooking.

Remember this: No matter what, a kid that age will eat ANYTHING he cooks himself.

Meat too raw? Kid'll wolf it down and clamor for more meat to cook.

Potato burned to a crisp? No problem, the kid'll eat a charcoal briquette and love it if he did it himself.

I swear, you could hand a kid a road killed racoon and if you help him guy it and let him cook it, he'll eat it and brag for weeks about eating the damned thing.

It's all about the kids doing things.


I agree!
Link Posted: 4/18/2008 6:27:53 PM EST
Fucking HOBO PIES MAN!!!!!! Cant go wrong with then.
Link Posted: 4/18/2008 6:34:50 PM EST
More Scout cooking Link
Link Posted: 4/18/2008 7:15:28 PM EST
The greatest meal I have ever eaten in my life was fried chicken and apple cobbler cooked in a dutch oven after 15 miles on the Appalachian Trail. Cooked by myself in a fire I lit myself when I was 13. Campout fried chicken is super easy, toss the chicken in a flour/corn meal mix with some seasoning. Put in the oven with a few tablespoons of your fat of choice. Done and delicious. Also, a handful of boys can do it assembly line style.

I remember a mystery casserole the scoutmaster made one time. Pretty much all the old unlabeled cans of food in the storage shed. I saw a can of (possible) clam chowder go in right after a can of peaches. No food for me that night.

I had made a special pan with legs so you could put one layer (main course) in the bottom of the dutch oven, and then have the pan w/ standoffs (for sides/desert) in there at the same time. I thought I was a genius but it was hard to get the timing right and half the time one or the other had to go back in the fire for a bit anyway. If you only have one dutch over it might be helpful though.
Link Posted: 4/18/2008 7:33:30 PM EST
First, it's sad that all too often, Cub Scout camp outs are organized and run by the women. It's at this period in the boys' lives that the men should be stepping up. Your Cubmaster is weak. I've been in Scouting all my life. I've seen this far too often. The more trained leaders that are available, the lighter the work load and the better quality program you will have. Scouting is not difficult. Do a little training, follow two-deep leadership, watch out for the boys and do all you can, expect other parents to be involved. Scouting is not a drive-by activity. Leave that to Campfire.

Second, your best bet is, as a father, to get the quick start training and go through University of Scouting (I believe that is what it is called now). You and each of the dads in the active Den or Pack should be trained. Your wives probably did it, now it's your turn. The bonus here is that it is a good building block for Webelos and Boy Scouts. Training doesn't end there, as you move along with your boy(s), do annual training, Boy Scout-specific training. Aim for Wood Badge. You'll earn friends for life, you'll build a quality program for your son(s) and the others. More important, you'll build a lifetime of memories for yourself and the boys, and a legacy for yourself.

Your itinerary should be simple:

- Meet at the pack meeting place. Pack check. Check trip permit. Drive to campout area.

- Arrive at campout area and assemble. Go over itinerary, get the tents set up by Den. Announce basic rules and guidelines and time to assemble for dinner and the campfire program.

- Dinner: A campfire with weenies and buns is perfect. The kids will torch half of them, but it's worth them having fun. Beans in the dutch oven are great. Smores for dessert are perfect. They will remember this for the majority of their adult life. Keep it safe, keep it fun.

- Campfire program: plan for each den to peform one skit. Follow the Scouting guidelines for appropriate material. Scoutmaster, or you, should lead a few simple scouting or camp songs. Perhaps one or two to start before the skits. Once the skits are done, do a few more sing-a-longs and wind down with a couple of slower songs. At this point, the scouts should be ready for a good night's rest.

- Have in your back pocket a number of activities that you can do at a moment's notice should the pace of activity drop or if the boys get bored. The last thing you need is an opportunity for mischief. Idle boys are like a flare in a dynamite warehouse.

Finally: remember that Scouting is a game with a purpose. Do it for the boys. Moments like these will make it all worthwhile:


Link Posted: 4/18/2008 7:36:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/19/2008 1:14:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/19/2008 1:16:58 AM EST by topknot]

Originally Posted By joe-bananas:
First, it's sad that all too often, Cub Scout camp outs are organized and run by the women. It's at this period in the boys' lives that the men should be stepping up. Your Cubmaster is weak. I've been in Scouting all my life. I've seen this far too often. The more trained leaders that are available, the lighter the work load and the better quality program you will have. Scouting is not difficult. Do a little training, follow two-deep leadership, watch out for the boys and do all you can, expect other parents to be involved. Scouting is not a drive-by activity. Leave that to Campfire.

Second, your best bet is, as a father, to get the quick start training and go through University of Scouting (I believe that is what it is called now). You and each of the dads in the active Den or Pack should be trained. Your wives probably did it, now it's your turn. The bonus here is that it is a good building block for Webelos and Boy Scouts. Training doesn't end there, as you move along with your boy(s), do annual training, Boy Scout-specific training. Aim for Wood Badge. You'll earn friends for life, you'll build a quality program for your son(s) and the others. More important, you'll build a lifetime of memories for yourself and the boys, and a legacy for yourself.

Your itinerary should be simple:

- Meet at the pack meeting place. Pack check. Check trip permit. Drive to campout area.

- Arrive at campout area and assemble. Go over itinerary, get the tents set up by Den. Announce basic rules and guidelines and time to assemble for dinner and the campfire program.

- Dinner: A campfire with weenies and buns is perfect. The kids will torch half of them, but it's worth them having fun. Beans in the dutch oven are great. Smores for dessert are perfect. They will remember this for the majority of their adult life. Keep it safe, keep it fun.

- Campfire program: plan for each den to peform one skit. Follow the Scouting guidelines for appropriate material. Scoutmaster, or you, should lead a few simple scouting or camp songs. Perhaps one or two to start before the skits. Once the skits are done, do a few more sing-a-longs and wind down with a couple of slower songs. At this point, the scouts should be ready for a good night's rest.

- Have in your back pocket a number of activities that you can do at a moment's notice should the pace of activity drop or if the boys get bored. The last thing you need is an opportunity for mischief. Idle boys are like a flare in a dynamite warehouse.

Finally: remember that Scouting is a game with a purpose. Do it for the boys. Moments like these will make it all worthwhile:

i167.photobucket.com/albums/u127/akguynumber12/Misc/TheScoutmaster.jpg


Excellent post Joe, in reference to the campout activities.

In general I agree that the leadership should be men, but in a small town, from time to time, it just doesn't work out that way. Annie stepped up because no one else could or would and is doing a fine job. She defers and delegates where she doesn't have a clue. She is a strong leader and personality in the community, and her husband is a den leader but much more laid back. I'm glad she's doing it.

Also, consider this. While these boys may not have the best program going in the country, they are learning and having fun and we leaders are doing our level best to see they do. All in all, it is worlds ahead of no program at all...

Thanks for your suggestions.

ETA: As to the training, thanks for the heads up, I'll look into the Wood Badge. I've done the quickstart training, but will go online and complete everything I can.
Link Posted: 4/19/2008 2:30:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 4/19/2008 2:47:22 AM EST
We always did the foil packs with burger, onions, carrots, and potatoes and they were awesome!
Link Posted: 4/19/2008 3:15:42 AM EST
Flour tortillas with a layer of cinnamon-sugar on them are great for dessert. Slice apples and you've got an "apple pie". No cleanup and the cinnamon-sugar can be made up beforehand and carried in a ziplock bag that lays flat after use or could even be used to carry out trash if the area you are camping in is low impact.
Don't forget the "gorp" (raisins, granola, M&M's, peanuts, etc.) for on the go energy.

Link Posted: 4/19/2008 4:16:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/19/2008 4:19:58 AM EST by AJE]
Some of the best burgers I've ever had...

Nobody had a grate to cook on so we raked some hot coals out on the ground right next to the fire, then took aluminum foil and wrapped a frozen beef pattie in with onions, mushrooms, seasoning, etc then cooked them right on the coals.

It was well passed my scout camping years, but damn good nonetheless.


Originally Posted By buckmaw:
www.frightcatalog.com/i/360x360/1213025.jpgwww.lakewoodconferences.com/direct/dbimage/50253656/Chainsaw.jpg


Cub Scout Hayride... Halloween time.... night time... bunch of scared Cub Scouts... dozens of scared kids... Best idea ever.

*I say this as one of the scared-shitless cub scouts
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