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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/5/2010 5:59:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:00:16 PM EDT by snakeshooter1]
If I buy more memory, do the GB's add or is it seperate? If I have a 1 gig and buy a 2 gig does it add up to 3 or is it still just a 2 gig?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:01:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:03:22 PM EDT by wolfstar]
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:03:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
If I buy more memory, do the GB's add or is it seperate? If I have a 1 gig and buy a 2 gig does it add up to 3 or is it still just a 2 gig?


Depends, kinda.

Most desktops will have X number of memory slots. Anywhere from 0 through X of those slots might be filled. If some are empty, and you add more memory, you will increase the amount of memory you have.

If the slots are full, you will have to buy larger capacity memory chips to replace the smaller ones.

On every machine I've owned, adding memory was as simple as buying the correct chip and inserting it into the slot. It was that simple. The tricky part is knowing what kind of chip to buy.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:04:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:06:45 PM EDT by Bugalaman]
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.


memory doesn't need to be installed in pairs, but it can improve performance if you do it right

ETA: Crucial is a great place for those not too good with computers. They tell you exactly how much memory was installed at the factory, plus all of your upgrade options
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:05:51 PM EDT
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:07:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.
posting from the comp i built... it's not hard, but take the time to do it right.

Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:08:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.


if you can build an AR15, you can build a computer. The only tools you need are a couple of screwdrivers and some time. There are plenty of guides online to show you how to do it. I find it very easy
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:08:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bugalaman:
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.


if you can build an AR15, you can build a computer. The only tools you need are a couple of screwdrivers and some time. There are plenty of guides online to show you how to do it. I find it very easy


This.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:09:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:09:41 PM EDT by coolrock6644]
It's incredibly easy. Just follow one of the multitude of tutorials from a decent site.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:09:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.


I've built two machines. If you can follow directions and use Legos, you can build a computer.

Again, the hard part is knowing what components to snap together. I haven't built a machine in over five years - there are quite a few more options these days. I stopped building machines because, for my needs, it's cheaper to buy. Software is the killer.

If you're surfing the web, writing letters, and managing spreadsheets, you don't even need a new computer. My current PC is about three years old, works fine. A cheap $400 PC from Walmart or Best Buy will handle basic tasks just fine.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:12:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:14:38 PM EDT by Tekka]
It depends on the operating system and the motherboard. Older operating systems don't recognize ram above a certain point.

Using myself as an example. I'm using a Lenovo S10 netbook. It's running Windows XP and the motherboard has 512MBs of ram built into it and there is one memory slot with a 512MB SODIMM. So I've got a total of 1GB of ram. If I take out the 512MB SODIMM and replace it with say a 2GB SODIMM. The computer will only recognize a maximum of 2GB because of the operating system.

With all of that said, it's best to put as much RAM into your computer as it can handle.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:15:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:17:26 PM EDT by snakeshooter1]
mine is about 6 years old now and it doesn't seem to be very fast now. I have done system restore and only have a few things (like Avast anti-virus, malwarebytes, super antispyware, HP all in one printer) added that didn't come on it . I'm running windows XP on it. It's a 100dx from Gateway
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:16:20 PM EDT
Another thing to remember when adding memory, a lot of systems are 32 bit. 32 bit systems can only access 4 gigs of memory.

Ram is considered a low priority, so things such as your graphics card, will reserve memory in front of the ram. If you install 4 gigs, you may only be able to use 3.5 gigs or so, depending on exact computer specs.

This does not apply to 64 bit systems, which can handle just about unlimited amounts of ram (with today's technology)
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:16:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By strat81:
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.


I've built two machines. If you can follow directions and use Legos, you can build a computer.

Again, the hard part is knowing what components to snap together. I haven't built a machine in over five years - there are quite a few more options these days. I stopped building machines because, for my needs, it's cheaper to buy. Software is the killer.

If you're surfing the web, writing letters, and managing spreadsheets, you don't even need a new computer. My current PC is about three years old, works fine. A cheap $400 PC from Walmart or Best Buy will handle basic tasks just fine.

These days it's really not worth it to build a PC unless you want tons of insane power for gaming or folding goodness.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:17:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tekka:

Originally Posted By strat81:
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
thanks, how hard is it to build your own computer? I really just use mine to surf the web and do some MS Office stuff. I don't play games, although I do download some songs and stuff like that.


I've built two machines. If you can follow directions and use Legos, you can build a computer.

Again, the hard part is knowing what components to snap together. I haven't built a machine in over five years - there are quite a few more options these days. I stopped building machines because, for my needs, it's cheaper to buy. Software is the killer.

If you're surfing the web, writing letters, and managing spreadsheets, you don't even need a new computer. My current PC is about three years old, works fine. A cheap $400 PC from Walmart or Best Buy will handle basic tasks just fine.

These days it's really not worth it to build a PC unless you want tons of insane power for gaming or folding goodness.


I agree, build it or have it built if you are a gamer, if not just buy one, much cheaper.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:18:21 PM EDT
Gateway 100dx with windows xp on it.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:20:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.
It depends upon the manufacturer.
Rambus memory is designed to work in pairs.
Others can be done either way.

What you want to do is look at the Current memory modules in your PC. Write down the specifications.

Example: DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 512x64
Several months ago I replaced those with DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 1024x64

If there are open slots all you have to do is get as many more memory cards as you do open slots.
If all the slots have been taken you get to upgrade the memory like I did.
Be Sure the new memory speed is exactly as the older chips. If they aren't you'll never get all the memory you are paying for.
After the new memory has been added make sure the BIOS is updated as well. Many systems don't have software that can take full measure of any additional memory.



CompTIA A+ Certified.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:22:08 PM EDT
I was thinking build because I really don't need all that crap they put on a new one now. I have heard that all those extra's slow it down. Maybe I should delete all the crap on mine and add memory to it?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:23:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:28:49 PM EDT by snakeshooter1]
Originally Posted By GiggleSmith:
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.
It depends upon the manufacturer.
Rambus memory is designed to work in pairs.
Others can be done either way.

What you want to do is look at the Current memory modules in your PC. Write down the specifications.

Example: DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 512x64
Several months ago I replaced those with DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 1024x64

If there are open slots all you have to do is get as many more memory cards as you do open slots.
If all the slots have been taken you get to upgrade the memory like I did.
Be Sure the new memory speed is exactly as the older chips. If they aren't you'll never get all the memory you are paying for.
After the new memory has been added make sure the BIOS is updated as well. Many systems don't have software that can take full measure of any additional memory.



CompTIA A+ Certified.


which of the numbers do I need to match? how do you make sure the BIOS updated. What is the BIOS?


Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:25:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:25:49 PM EDT by kcolg30]
Go with 8gb's 2-2-2-2 or 4-4
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:30:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
Originally Posted By GiggleSmith:
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.
It depends upon the manufacturer.
Rambus memory is designed to work in pairs.
Others can be done either way.

What you want to do is look at the Current memory modules in your PC. Write down the specifications.

Example: DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 512x64
Several months ago I replaced those with DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 1024x64

If there are open slots all you have to do is get as many more memory cards as you do open slots.
If all the slots have been taken you get to upgrade the memory like I did.
Be Sure the new memory speed is exactly as the older chips. If they aren't you'll never get all the memory you are paying for.
After the new memory has been added make sure the BIOS is updated as well. Many systems don't have software that can take full measure of any additional memory.



CompTIA A+ Certified.
which of the numbers do I need to match?
All but the last set.
DDR3 defines it as the later sets of memory chips. Namely Double Data Read, level 3 1066 refresh speed and I'm not certain about the rest. The 512x64/1024x64 is total memory. These sets of numbers can be changed with little problems.

Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:31:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
mine is about 6 years old now and it doesn't seem to be very fast now. I have done system restore and only have a few things (like Avast anti-virus, malwarebytes, super antispyware) added that didn't come on it .
I'm willing to bet you have an ATX case. If so:

A motherboard, $90
A CPU, $80
and RAM, $44

Throw in a WD $100 hardrive, and you might be set. Browse some tech sites. Browse newegg, tigerdirect, etc...

I got sick of looking at $2,000-$3,000 computers, so I built one for half the price. I'll never need another case or power supply, so the next one I build can be even more powerful.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:36:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bugalaman:
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.


memory doesn't need to be installed in pairs, but it can improve performance if you do it right

ETA: Crucial is a great place for those not too good with computers. They tell you exactly how much memory was installed at the factory, plus all of your upgrade options



Thanks that helped alot and its only $46 to max the memory out in it.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:39:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
Originally Posted By GiggleSmith:
Originally Posted By wolfstar:
I've always been told to buy memory in exact pairs. So you should replace the 1 GB with 2 X 2GBs at least.
It depends upon the manufacturer.
Rambus memory is designed to work in pairs.
Others can be done either way.

What you want to do is look at the Current memory modules in your PC. Write down the specifications.

Example: DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 512x64
Several months ago I replaced those with DDR3-1066 PC3-8500 CL7 1024x64

If there are open slots all you have to do is get as many more memory cards as you do open slots.
If all the slots have been taken you get to upgrade the memory like I did.
Be Sure the new memory speed is exactly as the older chips. If they aren't you'll never get all the memory you are paying for.
After the new memory has been added make sure the BIOS is updated as well. Many systems don't have software that can take full measure of any additional memory.



CompTIA A+ Certified.


which of the numbers do I need to match? how do you make sure the BIOS updated. What is the BIOS?
System BIOS. System Basic Input Output Setup
Oh, boy. I'm starting to think I should charge for all this. It's easier to show than to talk about.

In a nutshell do a Safe Boot. Follow the instructions on the screen to flash (update) the BIOS. Follow the instructions Exactly.
But all things considered, you're better off going to a Computer Pro and let them do it. The BIOS is too easy to mess up.


Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:51:08 PM EDT
Thanks guys going with the one Crucial recommended to max it out

Module Size: 2GB kit (1GBx2)
Package: 240-pin DIMM
Feature: DDR2 PC2-5300

Will I still need to check the BIOS?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:54:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
Thanks guys going with the one Crucial recommended to max it out

Module Size: 2GB kit (1GBx2)
Package: 240-pin DIMM
Feature: DDR2 PC2-5300

Will I still need to check the BIOS?

Probably. Like another poster mentioned: some systems can't understand beyond 4GB.
MY system is maxed out at 8GB because all the slots are used up.


Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:08:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GiggleSmith:
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
Thanks guys going with the one Crucial recommended to max it out

Module Size: 2GB kit (1GBx2)
Package: 240-pin DIMM
Feature: DDR2 PC2-5300

Will I still need to check the BIOS?

Probably. Like another poster mentioned: some systems can't understand beyond 4GB.
MY system is maxed out at 8GB because all the slots are used up.







But it's only 2 GB
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:13:53 PM EDT
Just do what crucial says , most of the time your desktop manufacturer will put max out the slots with the lowest size ram (IE 2x512mb instead of 1x1gb due to cost), so you might want to open it up and check to see if there's 1 or 2 memory sticks in there.


Thankfully i've got triple channel ram , so i max out at 24gb :)
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